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Which car would you choose?

  • Hyundai Ioniq 28 kWh - Top spec - 75 euro/month

    Votes: 13 36.1%
  • Hyundai Ioniq 38 kWh - Top spec - 130 euro/month

    Votes: 11 30.6%
  • Tesla Model 3 - Standard Range Plus - 290 euro/month

    Votes: 8 22.2%
  • Get a petrol or hybrid car between 250/300 euro/month

    Votes: 4 11.1%

  • Total voters
    36
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a use case where I need:

1. Enough trunkspace for 2 strollers, diaper bags etc.

2. At least 100 miles of winter range, preferably 120, given any condition (120-200km)

3. Occasional trips upwards of 120 miles (200 km)

4. A 700 mile (1100 km) trip once a year.

(1) and (2) are the most important. (3) is done in one if the most charger dense countries in Europe (4) could be split up in 2 days of travel.

Given the above, what would you choose, given the cost.
Note. Top spec, is exactly that. Everything Hyundai offers, including seat ventilation, sunroof, mica metallic (and anything else that might not be available in your own country).
Candidates for hybrids are Kia ceed Sportswagon and Toyota Corolla Touring sports atm. Considering Ioniq HEV but would prefer more space if not electric)
 

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If 95% of your needs are covered by 1, 2 and 3 can you then not hire a petrol car for no4 when you need it.

Boot space is essentially the same between the ioniq and the m3.

Given winter range needs I would say the 38 if it provides enough boot space.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
@yticolev and @SleeperPService: Thank you for replying!

@SleeperPService: Yes, that could work. (4) is by far the least important, as it's infrequent. Basically 1100 km one way trip to the inlaws on holiday..I'd be a bonus if we can do it in the same car though, as I'll be able to recoup around 40% of highway tariffs and fuel cost as 'travel expense'. It's actually one of the reasons that the M3 is on the list, as France (where we'll be headed) has notorious bad coverage of chargers and Tesla's own network of superchargers neatly circumvents that... But yes, if all is said and done, that's definitely the "nice to have" on the list.

Basically I travel for work, to customers throughout the Netherlands. I usually only have 1 customer, with projects taking around 3-24 months to complete. In the last 5 years, it has boiled down to one way trips of 25 - 50 miles (40 - 80km), usually with destination charging available on site or otherwise CCS charging on the highway. In theory it could be as much as 1,5 hours one way travel time, which boils down to around 100 miles (150 kms), but that hasn't happened so far...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
@Ayesha pass: Thanks for replying. I follow what you are saying and it does make sense when actually buying. This is however for a business lease, which in the Netherlands is heavily based on a given tax percentage (8% tax on purchase price a year for EV, 22% tax on purchase price per year for everything else). For instance, the top spec Ioniq Plug-In would cost me 310 euros a month and would have the least trunk space.
 

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@Ingmar:
for nr 4 you do not want the 38kWh model (slow fastcharging)
the 28kWh: wrt range in the winter: 150-160 km is tight, but with a five minute stop at a 175kW charger you add 30-35 km range. at a 50kW charger you need ~7 minutes.
Think about the amount of hours you need to work to compensate the difference in monthly cost :) and then you know how much time you can spent at the fastcharger
I have a 28kWh, sinds a bit under 3 yrs / 100k km driven. Twice ski holiday in Austria (~1100 km one way in ~16 hours).
 

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The price alone of the two Hyundai options seems to blow everything else out of the water. If you can accept the slight inconvenience of the slow "fastcharging" 38 kWh model at your annual 700 mile trip, its improved range will give you a comfortable margin for all other driving during the rest of the year.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
@XxHaimBondxX Yes. It's not ownership nor private lease, but basically it's part of my salary. The 290 euro a month is both tax and an additional payment on my side, both because the lease price exceeds the budget my employer grants me (which is not the case with the others) and because the price includes all costs including charge..
 

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Not sure about your financial situation, but heck yeah I'd get the Model 3. Definitely worth extra $150 or so for 10x the fun, especially if you drive a lot. Test drive them all, then make a decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
@haffi Thanks for replying. Technically I won't be the owner (my employer is), so referal codes won't work. I agree the M3 trunk is bigger, it is however very hard to reach with our stroller as the opening is very shallow (we already did a testdrive for the M3 quite a while ago). Would you say paying the 160 - 215 euro/month extra is worth the better car specs (AC Charging, DC Charging, Supercharger network)?
 

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I loved the M3 when I test drove it, most amazing car I've had a chance to drive. But the ioniq 38 was my choice, come winter and losing 1/3 or whatever it'll be for range, I still have more than enough to get to and from work and daycare and still have plenty to cruise around on. 28 would have gotten close during winter but I don't think I would have been in any worry really. Still would stick to 38 if I had a redo especially at those prices personally.

The charging speed doesn't bother me at all. Any long trips will be done with our diesel but week to week I'm charging at home anyways.
 

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I use my 38 for work and that includs some days driving 800km. On those trips I turn the charging times into rests, meal stops and paperwork stops. In Australia however the charge stations for non Tesla's are very far apart and very often not working which means that I have to add in extra stops just in case the next charge station isn't operational which is a real pain. Tesla however has so many destination chargers everywhere that this would eliminate this problem and anxiety. I wish all the competitors to Tesla would get together and start installing public chargers, only when they start doing this will they catch up in sales.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
@sarahbower1. Thanks for replying. It's one of the main reasons the Tesla is on the shortlist (besides fast AC and DC charging). I'm still reluctant to choose it though, as I find the price restrictive (I currently pay around 130 euros a month for my current car) and the aftermarket service centers in the Netherlands are kind of swamped due to overwhelming success of sales.
It's one of the selling points of Hyundai; regular dealer network, 'normal' aftersales (at least here in the Netherlands) and relatively high build quality of the products.
 
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