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Here is my story.

My main reason for purchasing this car was it 55MPG highway rating and 54 MPG city rating. I paid $32,500 as I go the premium addition. I never expected to get 55/54 but be in at least 5% of the recommended mileage. My last 3 cars have all been Toyota Prius.

I have been averaging per tank 42 to 43 mpg. My issue is the Highway driving. Here is when I average the worst performance. The city driving is better for MPG and on short drives, keeping it under 45mph and staying off the break (Power Hybrid driving) You can achieve 50 to 55 mpg. But doing (Power Hybrid driving) for a full tank of gas under these conditions as much as possible I was only able to get 46mpg.

I went through the first tank on the day I purchased it. I stopped by my dealer within the next 2 or 3 days after purchasing the 2020 Hyundai Ioniq. I did not have a service visit I just wanted to make sure I was looking at the readings correctly on the vehicle. This is when they told me I would have to put 5000 miles on the car for it
to learn my driving habits and the MPG would improve. (I would have returned the vehicle that day if I were not told this as it has never improved.)

I have had several visits to my dealer to address this issue. After the second visit to my dealer they told me that there was nothing they could do and I would have to file a complaint with Hyundai Corporate. My dealer were doing the short in city drive and got 50mpg and 51 mpg on their test. my dealer refused taking my vehicle on a test on the highway.

After my first two visits and my documentation below, my case manager Pauline recommended a buy back. However, Hyundai Corporate did not approve as my vehicle had not been tested by someone from Corporate. This took five months to setup due to Hyundai COVID-19 policies. Hyundai has taken the vehicle on 4 test drives. Three test drives were done by Hyundai Central Florida. All three test drives were in the city and around 26 miles. They averaged 50 to 55 mpg. My dealer would not take the vehicle out for testing on the highway. The test drive by Corporate representative went out on the highway for 60+ miles. His report on that trip was 41.9mpg. I was able to speak to him after his test drive. He filled the tank before his test drive and filled it again when he was done. He was also the corporate representative that was required by Hyundai Corporate.

This information is also documented in the paperwork at my dealer, but they would not provide me a copy. Hyundai Corporate and my case manager Pauline both recommended a buy back. Hyundai Corporate did not approve the buyback. They only provided me with a log information that was done in city on a 27.2 mile drive. They ignored
the issue with Highway driving and still will not address the issue. This is why I have opened a case with the Better Business Bureau for 3rd party representation.

Has anyone else had these issues? My last Prius I would drive it as a normal car and still get 48 something a gallon. And If I hyper drove the car I could get 55. Hyper driving my Ioniq on long distances I have only been able to achieve 46.
 

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UK spec 2020 1st Edition in Polar White
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In order that we can talk about the effectively, can you provide some context to your Highway Driving please?

This is an HEV?
What is the topography in your area?
What are the % readings on your Eco/Normal/Aggressive gauge?
What temperature do you set the A/C too and typical ambient temperature during the tests?
Describe your typical commute including typical speeds and different road types?
What tyre pressures you’re running?
What does hypermiling mean to you? Long distances at what speed to only get 46mpg?
 

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Red 2019 Ioniq 38 Premium EV
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As a general rule, Phevs running long trips on petrol get worse mpgs than the equivalent petrol-only ICE version, simply because they're carrying around a heavy battery as well. They only make sense if you're able to plug them in before the trips, when their 35 mile EV range (or whatever it is) corresponds to something like having a virtually-free gallon of petrol before you start out. And then on really high mileage trips, you'd work out better with a diesel anyway. So they are a solution for a particular niche, one that fits my needs very well.

Over 5 years I've managed 94 mpg in my Chevvy Volt Mk1 (sold as Ampera in UK); all my local trips are 100% electric, and these are 45 miles or less, that being my EV-only range. (US readings that would be 85 mpg) .I do regular trips of 160 miles non-stop, sometimes hypermiling if not in a hurry, and on those I get UK 65 mpg approx, as the "free" eletric-gallon counts towards that mpg figure. Annually I do 6k miles on electricity, 6k on petrol as near as I can estimate.

Keep tyres at max pressure; be super gentle on throttle; slipstream lorries when safe & suitable to do so; avoid heating cabin by using heated seats & steering wheel/gloves; Heat the cabin when running on petrol, but turn fan & heaters off the moment the car switches over to electric mode; coast down hills, maybe add a bit of speed as approaching bottom of dips so you can glide up the far side on slight throttle, slowing a bit as you do to crest next hill at a slower-than-cruising speed, all the things you can do on standard petrol cars.

I wish you well in your claim, but don't hold out a lot of hope as there's a lot of ways to get better mpgs out of Phevs on highways.

And if you wanr a better car, consider the Chevvy Volt Mk2; it's what a Phev should be, and it's the only one done correctly. Because it's a range-extended EV, not a petrol car tarted up with rather feeble electrics. In my book, any Phev is fundamentally a design error. Because it's possible to do the design correctly, as GM did with that great car.
 

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As a general rule, Phevs running long trips on petrol get worse mpgs than the equivalent petrol-only ICE version, simply because they're carrying around a heavy battery as well. They only make sense if you're able to plug them in before the trips, when their 35 mile EV range (or whatever it is) corresponds to something like having a virtually-free gallon of petrol before you start out.
Andy, I'm not sure I that I agree with your statement. I don't own a PHEV (I have a HEV) so perhaps I am mistaken. But my understanding of the PHEV is that when the traction battery is low, the vehicle essentially becomes an HEV, i.e. the ICE recharges the battery as the vehicle is being driven and when the the battery level is sufficient the vehicle will switch to EV mode until the battery becomes low again, etc. So if we accept that a PHEV with a low charge in the traction battery is essentially an HEV, then it should still get better mpg that most if not all equivalent petrol only ICE vehicles.

Again, I don't own a PHEV so I apologize in advance if I'm I'm expressing my ignorance.
 

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But my understanding of the PHEV is that when the traction battery is low, the vehicle essentially becomes an HEV, i.e. the ICE recharges the battery as the vehicle is being driven and when the the battery level is sufficient the vehicle will switch to EV mode until the battery becomes low again, etc.
Remember that Andy is comparing apples to apples. From his own statement, he's suggesting a PHEV running in pure hybrid mode on long trips vs a hybrid running on long trips. You're changing the parameters by adding the EV only range. You are correct that utilizing the EV battery before it changes to hybrid mode should return a better MPG rating, but that's not what Andy was comparing to. And Andy is right: a pure hybrid on long trips should return a better MPG than a PHEV in hybrid mode purely because there's a weight differential of ~300lbs.
 

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Red 2019 Ioniq 38 Premium EV
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Yup, a HEV is a different beast because the HV battery in there is deliberately small. It's taken for granted that trips in these will be 100% petrol (or diesel), so the aim is to maximise the eficiency of burning that fuel. So to do better then plain 'ole ancient ICE tech, you do things like running the ICE on an Atkinson cycle, run it at constant, steady maximum efficiency speed etc. A heavy battery is a drawback, so you want a small one, and it then become uneconomic & pointless to provide a plugin mains charger, as who's going to bother plugging in for just 4 miles extra range? Nissan e-Note is an excellent example of how this should be done, as it uses electric motors to drive the wheels, decoupling the ICE crankshaft entirely from anything to do with the wheels. So you can then junk the 6-speed DSG stuff, the clutches, the diff as well if you use 2 smaller motors @ 1/wheel. Hyundai HEVs & other similar ones simply haven't bitten the bullet of disconnecting crankshaft from the wheels, so pay the penalty of all the ICE + gearbox complications, plus complexity of added electrickery. Drive these through a town/city and you will burn fossil fuel, and emit the resulting pollutants where people are living nearby.

Plug-in hybrids come in 2 fundamental flavours, Rex range-extenders being the less well-known (but better) type.

REX such as i3 is rather like the Nissan e-Note if you like, except here the HV battery is really large, so then it's worth adding the mains & Rapid chargers, and then you only need the petrol ICE as emergency-get-you-out-of-trouble, really. You can run these on jus petrol, but it's not nice, as the ICE is 37 hp only, so struggles to accelerate hard on motorways. So the transition from e-Note to full EV is obvious. Simplify, throw out the old ICE stuff, and accept there are now different limitations in place, and learn to live with them & get the infrastructure needed, improved. I don't know why the e-Note hasn't been announced in UK, tbh.

REX such as Ampera is on paper virtually identical to Ioniq Phev. Same size, weight, v similar leccy range. But Ioniq Phev has all the 6-speed/whatever gearbox complications, + electrickery, so there's no simplification been done. When the ICE is powering the car, that has to be a variable-speed crankshaft job, as the gearbox limits the choice of ratios, so you cannot always guarantee the ICE will be running at that nice steady, constant, max-efficiency speed. The ICE is the most powerful motor, so when you do want 100% power for that overtake/traffic-merge, you have no option but to start the ICE up. And thrash it for a few moments. Even if it's stone cold. This is really not good for the engine, or your mpgs.

Volt/Ampera is like the e-Note, but on steroids! Nice large battery like Ioniq Phev (a lot larger, actually, but we only access 10.4 kWh), but the wheels are driven by a 150 hp electric motor, so 100% power acceleration is always done electrically, and you never get the ICE fired up just to meet this need. Ever. Then there's an extra 75 hp electric motor acting as flywheel for the ICE, starter motor, and a generator once the ICE is running. Oh, and it also feeds into the super-clever epicyclic gearbox that adds the 150 hp motor as one input, to the 75 hp/ICE crankshaft as the other input, and the combined speeds of these 2 inputs drive the wheels. Oh, and the 75 hp motor can be disconnected from the crankshaft by a simple dog-clutch - these have no parts that wear out, they're either 100% engaged, or 100% free. Trouble-free items. So this car, when on a long trip needing petrol, can run the ICE at a constant, max-efficiency speed, some of the crankshaft power going straight through the gearbox to wheels = the most efficient way to use petrol, the remaining crankshaft power is siphoned off by the up-to-75 hp generator & stored in HV battery, while the 150 HP motor is cruising at 1/2 it's max possible speed, and is doing the variable-speed adjustments as you vary the throttle. And after about 2-3 miles when around 0.4 kWh energy has been siphoned off into the battery, the ICE disengages he dog-clutch & shuts down, while the 75 hp generator takes over & becomes a motor, and you do a couple of miles in silence with no ICE, as the 2 motors use up the 0.4 kWh buffer. Then when that's run out, the ICE is started up (something clever's been done, maybe another dog-clutch in there somewhere, as the 75 hp motor is needed to start it), and once the iCE is started & up-to-speed matching the gearbox input shaft speed, the dog-clutch engages he ICE into the gearbox, and then the process restarts.

It all sounds complex, and yes it is, but it works beautifully, and amazingly reliably because the 6-speed g'box & clutches have been junked, replaced by gears that never need clutching or disengaging/engaging, and the ICE engine now only needs to be 75 hp (or less would do) so is a highly de-tuned reliable old iron-block 1.4L engine that runs at a max 4500 rpm, and never, ever, gets thrashed. Least of all from cold! Ballpark mpgs are around 45 mpg UK at motorway cruising speeds 60-70, 40 if you push it hard, but hypermile it/drive gently at holiday speeds not exceeding 60 mph and it will do 50 mpg. Not bad for a nearly 2-ton petrol car, not he greatest, but add-in that "free" gallon ( have solar panels) and the righ pattern of usage, and you can get amazing mpgs! As you can with Ioniq PHEV, of course. Just not so pleasantly!

So Ampera gets all the benefits of an EV when there's electricity in the battery, and only suffers ICE noise/vibe on the longer trips. And of course it uses the ICE heat to warm the cabin, unlike i3 REX which missed a trick here (but is simpler for it, of course). And the great benefits of PHEVs/Rexes over HEVs & MHEVs are of course no range anxiety, and ability to avoid burning fossil fuel in built-up areas.

Back to Ioniq HEV .vs. Ioniq Phev on super-long trips (let's say 300 miles+?) I'm thinking trips where the initlial large boost of electricity in the Phev isn't significant. Which should be more efficient? Hard to say as I don't know the HEV model at all. Assuming it's exactly like the Phev, but smaller battery & no plugin = a cheaper car, it should on paper be lighter, and that should make it more efficient. But if you have say 30 extra electric miles to begin wih in the Phev, your Hev has to be about 10% more efficient to do better on trips of 300 miles. That's a bit efficiency improvement to ask for, and probably impossible. 5% maybe? Then 600 mile trips are the crossover point. Hevs are better than pure ICE, sure, but Phevs take some beating! Until pure BEVs have the range (and price) you want.
 

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I don't know about my 2020 since I haven't done true highway mileage yet but in my 2019 PHEV I routinely got over 50mpg on the highway doing between 70 and 80mph on the highway......no PHEV battery in play there at all just solely running in HEV mode with no battery left.
 

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You do know that winter has a big effect on fuel mileage and a bigger % effect on Hybrid vehicles. This is primarily because cold weather forces the engine to run some times just to keep the coolant temp hot, because cabin comfort is prioritized over everything else by the powertrain controller. The engine run more of the time if you demand more heat for the cabin. In my Hybrid, I get 44-48mpg in winter and 54-56 in summer. I can get nearly 60 mpg at 70 MPH on a long trip.
 

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I do not track my mpg carefully but in general I average around 49MPG with mixed city/highway based on the mileage computer. I live in Albuquerque, 5,000 foot elevation with a few hundred feet elevation changes on my daily drives. I seem to get about the same summer or winter, although I do remote start my vehicle quite a bit in the summer. Average drive is 50 miles or so with about half at 75MPH and half about 35-40MPH. I generally try to keep it in the green eco range but do go to 4-5 bars when accelerating. I did a road trip to Atlanta and I think I averaged about the same MPG. best Ive seen is maybe 56 and worse about 45. I have a limited / ultimate HEV.

It seems like better mileage requires 3 bars acceleration max and speeds under 60MPH which is too slow for me.
 

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Here is my story.

My main reason for purchasing this car was it 55MPG highway rating and 54 MPG city rating. I paid $32,500 as I go the premium addition. I never expected to get 55/54 but be in at least 5% of the recommended mileage. My last 3 cars have all been Toyota Prius.

I have been averaging per tank 42 to 43 mpg. My issue is the Highway driving. Here is when I average the worst performance. The city driving is better for MPG and on short drives, keeping it under 45mph and staying off the break (Power Hybrid driving) You can achieve 50 to 55 mpg. But doing (Power Hybrid driving) for a full tank of gas under these conditions as much as possible I was only able to get 46mpg.

I went through the first tank on the day I purchased it. I stopped by my dealer within the next 2 or 3 days after purchasing the 2020 Hyundai Ioniq. I did not have a service visit I just wanted to make sure I was looking at the readings correctly on the vehicle. This is when they told me I would have to put 5000 miles on the car for it
to learn my driving habits and the MPG would improve. (I would have returned the vehicle that day if I were not told this as it has never improved.)

I have had several visits to my dealer to address this issue. After the second visit to my dealer they told me that there was nothing they could do and I would have to file a complaint with Hyundai Corporate. My dealer were doing the short in city drive and got 50mpg and 51 mpg on their test. my dealer refused taking my vehicle on a test on the highway.

After my first two visits and my documentation below, my case manager Pauline recommended a buy back. However, Hyundai Corporate did not approve as my vehicle had not been tested by someone from Corporate. This took five months to setup due to Hyundai COVID-19 policies. Hyundai has taken the vehicle on 4 test drives. Three test drives were done by Hyundai Central Florida. All three test drives were in the city and around 26 miles. They averaged 50 to 55 mpg. My dealer would not take the vehicle out for testing on the highway. The test drive by Corporate representative went out on the highway for 60+ miles. His report on that trip was 41.9mpg. I was able to speak to him after his test drive. He filled the tank before his test drive and filled it again when he was done. He was also the corporate representative that was required by Hyundai Corporate.

This information is also documented in the paperwork at my dealer, but they would not provide me a copy. Hyundai Corporate and my case manager Pauline both recommended a buy back. Hyundai Corporate did not approve the buyback. They only provided me with a log information that was done in city on a 27.2 mile drive. They ignored
the issue with Highway driving and still will not address the issue. This is why I have opened a case with the Better Business Bureau for 3rd party representation.

Has anyone else had these issues? My last Prius I would drive it as a normal car and still get 48 something a gallon. And If I hyper drove the car I could get 55. Hyper driving my Ioniq on long distances I have only been able to achieve 46.
I purchased my 2020 HEV in Sept of 2019. I've yet to get over 50 mpg. I have 2200 miles on it so far and I drive it very carefully as they say drive it like you are stepping on an egg. I don't know why my gas mileage is so low either. I still own my 2010 Prius and get about the same MPG with it as well, but that is expected. My dear friend owns a 2016 Prius that I drove this past Oct on a 4-hour trip that was 1/2 highway 1/2 off-highway miles and she got 60 mpg in her car. I know Hyundai is much lower in price than the Toyota which was the biggest reason I purchase it, plus the 3 years maintenance warranty as well. My Prius has over 170,000 miles on it and it is in great shape. I am regretting my purchase now since I thought I would get at least 51-52 MPG especially when they advertise 58. I live in the country and drive mostly highway miles when I do drive. I don't understand it.
 

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I don't think there's ever been an explicit or implicit warranty that your mileage will match the EPA estimate for any vehicle. It sounds like you think the car is defective, which it well could be. But unless there's objective evidence that the engine or batteries are not working correctly, there's probably nothing the dealer can do to "fix" the problem.

Did you do any research into real-world mpg reports before purchase? If you look at Fuelly: Hyundai Ioniq MPG - Actual MPG from 519 Hyundai Ioniq owners the average is 51 but it looks like 15% or so get 46 or less. A Motor Trend test drive yielded 38-41: https://www.motortrend.com/cars/hyundai/ioniq/2020/hyundai-ioniq-range-test/ This test drive got 46 in the city: 2020 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid Review & Test Drive : Automotive Addicts

Do you have a friend or family member who'd be willing to trade cars with you for a week or two? If other people get higher mpg than you, then it must be a driving style effect. But if everyone gets the same as you, then it's a car effect. And if you're really unhappy with it, can't you just sell it or trade it in on something different? I know you'd likely lose money because of depreciation but if you're angry at the car and the Hyundai company every time you drive it then it may be better in the long run to get another car.
 

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Here is my story.

My main reason for purchasing this car was it 55MPG highway rating and 54 MPG city rating. I paid $32,500 as I go the premium addition. I never expected to get 55/54 but be in at least 5% of the recommended mileage. My last 3 cars have all been Toyota Prius.

I have been averaging per tank 42 to 43 mpg. My issue is the Highway driving. Here is when I average the worst performance. The city driving is better for MPG and on short drives, keeping it under 45mph and staying off the break (Power Hybrid driving) You can achieve 50 to 55 mpg. But doing (Power Hybrid driving) for a full tank of gas under these conditions as much as possible I was only able to get 46mpg.

I went through the first tank on the day I purchased it. I stopped by my dealer within the next 2 or 3 days after purchasing the 2020 Hyundai Ioniq. I did not have a service visit I just wanted to make sure I was looking at the readings correctly on the vehicle. This is when they told me I would have to put 5000 miles on the car for it
to learn my driving habits and the MPG would improve. (I would have returned the vehicle that day if I were not told this as it has never improved.)

I have had several visits to my dealer to address this issue. After the second visit to my dealer they told me that there was nothing they could do and I would have to file a complaint with Hyundai Corporate. My dealer were doing the short in city drive and got 50mpg and 51 mpg on their test. my dealer refused taking my vehicle on a test on the highway.

After my first two visits and my documentation below, my case manager Pauline recommended a buy back. However, Hyundai Corporate did not approve as my vehicle had not been tested by someone from Corporate. This took five months to setup due to Hyundai COVID-19 policies. Hyundai has taken the vehicle on 4 test drives. Three test drives were done by Hyundai Central Florida. All three test drives were in the city and around 26 miles. They averaged 50 to 55 mpg. My dealer would not take the vehicle out for testing on the highway. The test drive by Corporate representative went out on the highway for 60+ miles. His report on that trip was 41.9mpg. I was able to speak to him after his test drive. He filled the tank before his test drive and filled it again when he was done. He was also the corporate representative that was required by Hyundai Corporate.

This information is also documented in the paperwork at my dealer, but they would not provide me a copy. Hyundai Corporate and my case manager Pauline both recommended a buy back. Hyundai Corporate did not approve the buyback. They only provided me with a log information that was done in city on a 27.2 mile drive. They ignored
the issue with Highway driving and still will not address the issue. This is why I have opened a case with the Better Business Bureau for 3rd party representation.

Has anyone else had these issues? My last Prius I would drive it as a normal car and still get 48 something a gallon. And If I hyper drove the car I could get 55. Hyper driving my Ioniq on long distances I have only been able to achieve 46.
I purchased my 2020 HEV in Sept of 2019. I've yet to get over 50 mpg. I have 2200 miles on it so far and I drive it very carefully as they say drive it like you are stepping on an egg. I don't know why my gas mileage is so low either. I still own my 2010 Prius and get about the same MPG with it as well, but that is expected. My dear friend owns a 2016 Prius that I drove this past Oct on a 4-hour trip that was 1/2 highway 1/2 off-highway miles and she got 60 mpg in her car. I know Hyundai is much lower in price than the Toyota which was the biggest reason I purchase it, plus the 3 years maintenance warranty as well. My Prius has over 170,000 miles on it and it is in great shape. I am regretting my purchase now since I thought I would get at least 51-52 MPG especially when they advertise 58. I live in the country and drive mostly highway miles when I do drive. I don't understand it.
I have a 2018 Standard hybrid. I have owned it now for 3 years, with 42K miles, mostly freeway. I live in San Diego, California, and still love it. I have noticed some degradation in mileage, but not as much as you have stated. The first couple years have started at 55-57mpg on a tank of 87. I've switched to 89. The latest number, this past weekend, was 53.5mpg. There was a stoppage of production in 2018, due to a shortage of batteries. I still haven't found out if mine was before, during or after the stoppage.
 

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there are so many variables that affects the mileage . outside temp, terrain , city or hyway. if you are driving on a freeway that is flat as a board then the mileage will be higher. up and down hills a lot will be less.

live in the seatlle area and i have seen 60 mpg in the summer and 45 in the winter with our 2019 SEL.
 
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