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Cyber Grey AWD SEL
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Sorry to see your brand new car damaged.

I just got my I5 back from Gerber collision after five weeks in repair. They did a good job and I am happy with their work.
I assume your car can be driven. Getting the parts is the critical path. Lead time was about 8 weeks for parts. Make sure your shop has received all parts before beginning the repair. My five week repair process was due to the discovery of hidden damage after the start of the repair process that required additional parts. Total time from accident to completion of repair was 17 weeks. 4 weeks to find the right shop, 8 weeks for initial parts delivery, and 5 weeks in the shop.

Just my experience. Good luck.
 

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Cyber Grey AWD SEL
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Thanks for sharing your experience. This is very helpful..

I am exactly following your process, finding a right place, and I am still struggling what is the right logistics:

1. My vehicle seems drivable, but it also needs check-up to make sure all the critical parts (motor, battery, HV-related things..) are okay. Should I start body job or major EV checkup in dealer’s service center?

A. The I5 has a very robust set of sensors and systems status warnings which should give you an idea whether or not to take it to the dealer. I would take it to a safe area to operate the vehicle and run through all of the systems checking for warnings. If you don't get a warning that the car should not be driven, then it's likely driveable. I say this because I saw one poster here who had taken his vehicle into Hyundai for a heater issue. Dealer found the unit defective, back ordered a new heater unit and refused to return the car to the owner. I say this only if you need your car, if its your only vehicle.

2. The other concern is how to proceed body job without affecting the warranty.

A. On the Hyundai website there is a list of Hyundai certified collision repair centers. Using one of those repair centers should preserve your Hyundai warranty. If work is done at a non-certified shop there is the potential that Hyundai may deny warranty coverage if the body repair is deemed to have caused damage to the vehicle's other systems.

Also, insurance companies generally have certified repair shops. The insurer will generally guarantee a satisfactory result if you use one of their shops. Hopefully one or more shops are on both Hyundai and insurer lists. There were two for me. Gerber and Caliber.

3. Once I am at the point in sending vehicle to body shop, how might be signs or indications they can do right jobs on Ioniq5?

A. You select the shop where both Hyundai and insurer certify and warrant satisfactory work and hope for the best. My Ionic 5 was the first I5 the shop techs had ever seen. It turned out ok. I asked if there was any problems because of this. Told me the body of the car goes together and comes apart just like any other Hyundai and there were no problems other than parts delay.

(4. one more question - Gerber collision is in bay area, CA? I couldn’t find one. Could you share the place you sent your I5?)

A. Gerber is a national chain with no less than 16 locations in Southern California, but, alas, none in the Bay Area. Sorry, but check out Hyundai website and ask Dealer who they send their body repair work to.
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I do hope you find several shops that will help you. Your damage is greater than mine. I owned my car for only 7 days before I was rear ended on 1/6. Got it back yesterday. Best of luck!

Many thanks,
 
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