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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Ioniq 5 has features that Teslas don't at the moment and here you can find a full list of them.


Electrical Architecture
The compact EV will boast an 800-volt electrical architecture, the same as a Porsche Taycan, and double that of Tesla’s 400-volt system. This means charging will be fast. The company claims it only takes 18 minutes to charge 80 percent of the battery. The charging port can open with a button, the key fob, or with a smartphone app.

Vehicle-to-Load
Vehicle-to-load (V2L) is a first! Owners can use the battery pack to power many things. For example, you can power devices or appliances inside or out of the Ioniq 5 by plugging in a unique outlet connector to the charging port or from the three-prong outlet in the back seat. What’s even cooler is being able to charge other EVs. You read that correctly, the Ioniq 5 can charge other EVs in the case of an emergency (or to show off).

Long Wheelbase
The wheelbase is long, about 118 inches. That's longer than any Hyundai model including the large Palisade SUV. This means more interior room. The floor is also completely flat. That’s the beauty of a dedicated EV platform. The Ioniq 5 rides on the company’s new E-GMP platform. Just look at those short overhangs. In case you're curious, the wheelbase of a Tesla Model S is 116.5 inches.

Relaxion
Relaxion is what the automaker calls the front seats that recline almost all the way. The Ford F-150 isn’t the only one now. Hyudai says drivers can use this feature while charging or for resting. Both the instrument cluster and center touchscreen are 12.3 inches and the Ioniq 5 sports a column shifter. The drive mode selector is on the steering wheel, like a Porsche.

Trailer Mode and AR Mode
Who would have thought an EV would have a Tailer Mode, but the Ioniq 5 does. When the mode is selected, the driving range automatically adjusts to the weight of the trailer in tow. Like many EVs, the Ioniq 5 has one-pedal driving, but unlike many, it can stop on a downhill slope. AR (augmented reality) mode is basically a huge head-up display (HUD) that helps you drive.

Remote Self-Parking
The Ioniq 5 will be loaded to the gills with driver-assist features including changing lanes on its own. However, what’s interesting is the self-parking system. You can decide to stay in the car while it parks itself or stand outside and remotely use the key fob to complete the parking job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
This video makes some comparisons to the Tesla Model Y.


"First of all, the Ioniq 5 is a "ground-up" electric vehicle. Not like beef or cracked pepper, but rather, it's not just another gas car converted to an EV, such as the Hyundai Kona EV or Kia Niro Electric. The Ioniq 5 offers loads of passenger and cargo space, plenty of range, a unique and attractive exterior, and a modern, tech-filled cabin.

The Tesla fan we're talking about here in Cleanerwatt. He has an EV-related YouTube channel that he mostly uses to run well-researched car comparisons. Even though he is clearly a Tesla promoter, he does a good job remaining fair and impartial, though he usually chooses the Tesla as the winner in the end. It's important to note that he doesn't choose the winner simply based on his opinion, but based on its specs and pricing compared to the available specs of the competing EV.

In this case, Cleanerwatt says he is a "BIG FAN!" of the Ioniq 5. There's little not to like about it. But, does he choose it as the overall winner? Check out the video to find out."

 

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But is Hyundai's name actually worth something? New to the brand and feel like it's below VW which is below Audi...
IMO VW isn't a good company. They are mediocre at best and Audi is the same just more expensive with nicer interiors.
Now, is Hyundai better?? I think with all their recalls and stuff so far, it'd be ignorant to say they are better than either of those brands. The difference to me, is that one of them is hungry, and one of them is fat and already had half their meal.

So when VW fights me on every little issue, Hyundai might be more willing to just fix the car and not play games. This is also very dealer dependent, which the manufacturer (at least in the USA) has no control over.

This is ALL assumption, I've never owned a Hyundai. My cousin had one 6 years ago and she liked it well enough as a starter car and it had good value for what she paid.

AND, to top it all off, Hyundai is trying to spin off Ioniq as an entirely new brand, like genesis. So will that new piece of the puzzle change how your car gets treated at your Hyundai dealer?


So, to sum up all my rambling: No one knows and it's all a crap shoot, we are going to be "early adopters" of this ioniq brand, and assume all the risks that come with that. I'm anticipating like every new car, there will be some issues they didn't find in their shake downs. How they respond to these issues will make or break their company IMO.

All these discussions have me seriously considering a lease on this car, until the second gen or fixes come after the first 2-3 years. Then buy gen 2 if they've fulfilled my expectations.
 

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IMO VW isn't a good company. They are mediocre at best and Audi is the same just more expensive with nicer interiors.
Now, is Hyundai better?? I think with all their recalls and stuff so far, it'd be ignorant to say they are better than either of those brands. The difference to me, is that one of them is hungry, and one of them is fat and already had half their meal.

So when VW fights me on every little issue, Hyundai might be more willing to just fix the car and not play games. This is also very dealer dependent, which the manufacturer (at least in the USA) has no control over.

This is ALL assumption, I've never owned a Hyundai. My cousin had one 6 years ago and she liked it well enough as a starter car and it had good value for what she paid.

AND, to top it all off, Hyundai is trying to spin off Ioniq as an entirely new brand, like genesis. So will that new piece of the puzzle change how your car gets treated at your Hyundai dealer?


So, to sum up all my rambling: No one knows and it's all a crap shoot, we are going to be "early adopters" of this ioniq brand, and assume all the risks that come with that. I'm anticipating like every new car, there will be some issues they didn't find in their shake downs. How they respond to these issues will make or break their company IMO.

All these discussions have me seriously considering a lease on this car, until the second gen or fixes come after the first 2-3 years. Then buy gen 2 if they've fulfilled my expectations.
Thanks for your insight. It would be a 4 year lease for me, and have leased VW past 12 years with hardly any hiccups (company car lease that is).
We'll see soon enough :)
 

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Thanks for your insight. It would be a 4 year lease for me, and have leased VW past 12 years with hardly any hiccups (company car lease that is).
We'll see soon enough :)
I think leasing is a safe bet for either company. I'm just not super confident in either for 100k+ miles. But if we are leasing, that isn't our problem!!

I'm also a known vw hater just fyi lol
 

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I think leasing is a safe bet for either company. I'm just not super confident in either for 100k+ miles. But if we are leasing, that isn't our problem!!

I'm also a known vw hater just fyi lol
Haha I kind of felt that. There's many things to like and hate about lots of stuff :)
Just wouldn't want to lease it for 4 years and have all sorts of features not work anymore. That's my biggest fear. And with VW I've been fully functional all the time. Only outage was few months ago just before a trip the orange engine light went on. Ended up going on that family trip with a huge Skoda Kodiaq automatic (good dealer suggested Fabia but made the switch luckily).
The leasing company offered me a new Toyota Corolla for a few days. Now THAT was an awful car. Still gives me the shivers.
So how good is Hyundai in making sure my car doesn't end up in the shop more than in my driveway?
 

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Haha I kind of felt that. There's many things to like and hate about lots of stuff :)
Just wouldn't want to lease it for 4 years and have all sorts of features not work anymore. That's my biggest fear. And with VW I've been fully functional all the time. Only outage was few months ago just before a trip the orange engine light went on. Ended up going on that family trip with a huge Skoda Kodiaq automatic (good dealer suggested Fabia but made the switch luckily).
The leasing company offered me a new Toyota Corolla for a few days. Now THAT was an awful car. Still gives me the shivers.
So how good is Hyundai in making sure my car doesn't end up in the shop more than in my driveway?
I think in general they are good. But with new cars you never know. I generally avoid first year models.

Ive thought about a Corolla as a cheap around town car, I just can’t do it, from your experience it sounds like I’ve made the right choice!
 

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My experiences so far.

VW diesel died after 180k km after precisely 10 years. cost of repair was not worth it.
expectation of a diesel car was to run to 15 years, and let’s say 250-300k km.
Perhaps my expectations were too high.

I was initially pining for a model Y, but that does not appear to be available until maybe next year in Europe.
tried a Tesla 3 but the space felt too small for my family needs, Just 4. It we are used to a little more room for the trunk.
The single screen and pretty hard regen braking did not help either.

id4 felt a little old fashion internals. Was not even offered nor suggested one by the car dealer when my vw died

so … reserved for an ioniq 5

need something by fall too.
 

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In the US, I have 7,500 reasons to like the Ioniq5 over the TMY - they all have pictures of George Washington on them. The $7,500 tax credit that is available with Hyundai but not Tesla.
 

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Tesla great job, max speed, range especially. Still prefer, being in Europe, comfort. 99% of my trips are within 200kms one way. I WANT ventilated seats, Android Auto, and HUD. Also like reclining seats with foot rest and reclining console for arms rest, all electronic aids especially against collisions, automated parking (Executive version), blind spot cams on dashboard when turning, V2L, sun shades integrated in back doors, sunroof shade, wide space available inside with good visibility through the back window etc. Also 5 year car warranty illimited kms (Max 80 000 for Tesla... Reliability issues?), and 8 year battery warranty (same as Tesla).
 

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In the US, I have 7,500 reasons to like the Ioniq5 over the TMY - they all have pictures of George Washington on them. The $7,500 tax credit that is available with Hyundai but not Tesla.
You are aware of how few people are able to use that deduction at all, nevermind the full amount….right?
 

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You are aware of how few people are able to use that deduction at all, nevermind the full amount….right?
Actually most people who are buying a $45k to $55k car should be able to use most or all of it. For a family of 4 filing jointly, it takes a little less than $80,000 income to generate a tax bill of $7,500. The recommendation from most financial advisors is to never spend more than ½ your annual salary for the purchase price of a car. For retired people, they often find they can convert an IRA or 401K to a Roth to avoid required distributions and have the car pay the tax bill. I have found from communications on other EV web sites, that most who buy this type of car can use the tax credit.
 

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Actually most people who are buying a $45k to $55k car should be able to use most or all of it. For a family of 4 filing jointly, it takes a little less than $80,000 income to generate a tax bill of $7,500. The recommendation from most financial advisors is to never spend more than ½ your annual salary for the purchase price of a car. For retired people, they often find they can convert an IRA or 401K to a Roth to avoid required distributions and have the car pay the tax bill. I have found from communications on other EV web sites, that most who buy this type of car can use the tax credit.
Married without kids making $170k. We get a refund every year and don’t owe. This does nothing for us in the U.S. You have to owe the IRS come tax time to be able to use this.
 

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Married without kids making $170k. We get a refund every year and don’t owe. This does nothing for us in the U.S. You have to owe the IRS come tax time to be able to use this.
Do you pay quarterly? Or is it taken from your check, maybe change your deductions for a year, and save accordingly to pay it all at the end. Then switch back for the rest of your future.

If you paid quarterly, you could come up short intentionally.

The new administration seems to be pushing the child tax credit up front, BECAUSE, most people they want it to go to, never owe in the first place. I don't want to get into politics, but if they continued with that trend, and applied it to this credit... then you'd get it when you bought the car, or quickly after. This would reach the level of income they are supposedly trying to help get into electric. Bills hardly ever help who they say they do on the title though!
 

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Actually most people who are buying a $45k to $55k car should be able to use most or all of it. For a family of 4 filing jointly, it takes a little less than $80,000 income to generate a tax bill of $7,500. The recommendation from most financial advisors is to never spend more than ½ your annual salary for the purchase price of a car. For retired people, they often find they can convert an IRA or 401K to a Roth to avoid required distributions and have the car pay the tax bill. I have found from communications on other EV web sites, that most who buy this type of car can use the tax credit.
No. You’re assumptions are just wrong. These credits are tracked, look up how much money was actually credited. You’ll be shocked. Most working class stiffs pay weekly so they can get a refund. Stupidest thing ever, but that’s what the VAST majority do. The “others” have incomes such as they know how to claim losses, and pay quarterlies to avoid writing checks every year, or quarter.
 
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