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The Ioniq 5 comes with two battery options, 58 kWh or 72.6 kWh and two electric motor options (rear motor or dual motor).

With the 72.6 kWh battery and the RWD option Hyundai says you can get 470-480 km (292-298 miles) of range.


IONIQ 5 is available with a range of power electric (PE) configurations to fit the mobility needs of every customer, with no compromises on performance. Customers can select from two battery pack options, either 58 kWh or 72.6 kWh, and two electric motor layouts, either with a rear motor only or with both front and rear motors. All PE variations provide outstanding range and deliver a top speed of 185 km/h.

At the top of the electric motor lineup is an all-wheel drive (AWD) option paired with the 72.6-kWh battery, producing a combined power output of 225-kWh and 605 Nm of torque. This PE configuration can go from 0 km/h to 100 km/h in 5.2 seconds.

When equipped with two-wheel drive (2WD) and 72.6-kWh battery, IONIQ 5’s maximum driving range on a single charge will be around 470~480 km[4], according to the Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP) standard.
 

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The Ioniq 5 looks really good. Great design. I am however a bit disappointed at the predicted range figures and surprised the difference in battery capacity between the two options is so small. The 58 kWh version makes a lot of sense but the bigger battery could have been closer to 80 kWh with a range of 500+ km. This is a bit of a shame.
 

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I’m also disappointed by the range given the expected price. If this French website is correct Hyundai Ioniq 5 : tout savoir sur le SUV électrique nouvelle génération the large battery version will cost 59550€ in Germany. That’s 1500€ more than the Long Range Model Y which goes 505km. Not to mention the LR Model 3 which goes 580km at 50k€ - both complete with the Supercharger network.

If Hyundai wants to start charging Tesla prices they have a lot to improve upon imo.
 

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The 59550 € in Germany is not for "the large battery version" but for the First Edition which has much more than only a large battery. Prices for the separate options will come later, although in Germany already for the lowest base model 42 000 € is mentioned.
 
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Considering how fast this thing should charge, there's even less need for a 70+ kWh battery than there is on, say, the ID.3 LR that maxes out at 125 kW I believe. The bigger the battery you have, the greater %age of the time you're simply lugging around a large, heavy, expensive section that's not getting a lot of use.

That extra capacity is continually costing you extra energy to carry it (more weight on tyres = more drag), more tyre wear, and slower acceleration. Providing your 250 kW Rapids are spaced less than, say, 150 km apart, you should be fine with a 250-300 km range, surely?

And why not let Hyundai make more EVs of slightly smaller battery, that way more people get to drive an EV and sooner?
60 kWh really does seem to be a sweet spot, decent range at last yet not excessively heavy.
 

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Considering how fast this thing should charge, there's even less need for a 70+ kWh battery...
60 kWh really does seem to be a sweet spot, decent range at last yet not excessively heavy.
Exactly. For a normal average (at least European) consumer there is no need for batteries above 70kWh. And besides, above that we cannot speak about environmentally friendly/reasonable solution.
 

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Exactly. For a normal average (at least European) consumer there is no need for batteries above 70kWh. And besides, above that we cannot speak about environmentally friendly/reasonable solution.
Even in the vast US, the average daily distance driven is only 40 miles/64k so lugging around all of that weight is the opposite of efficiency. Then add in the CD of a toaster for SUV/CUVs and you end up with most people could care less. I believe one of Elon's early concepts in response to charge times was swappable battery packs – major eco points to the company that develops modular batteries that can be added for those "what if" scenarios. Eh, never mind. Folks still don't understand what a hybrid is.
 

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Average distance in UK is quoted as something like 29 miles, but this is a completely meaningless figure for most people. Annual mileage/356_days is garbage, annual mileage/ working-days-in-a-year is equally garbage, unless you only ever commute & do nothing else at all.

You really have to look at the driving pattern of the individual to see what's needed.
My pattern is lots of local trips < 20 miles, and a few of 160 of more miles non-stop. It's your longest trips you want to spec the battery for, not the short ones, so for USA I'm not surprised to see people wanting 400+ mile range. Australia can need similar range as major cities are so far apart, with little between them.
 

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Considering how fast this thing should charge, there's even less need for a 70+ kWh battery than there is on, say, the ID.3 LR that maxes out at 125 kW I believe. The bigger the battery you have, the greater %age of the time you're simply lugging around a large, heavy, expensive section that's not getting a lot of use.

That extra capacity is continually costing you extra energy to carry it (more weight on tyres = more drag), more tyre wear, and slower acceleration. Providing your 250 kW Rapids are spaced less than, say, 150 km apart, you should be fine with a 250-300 km range, surely?

And why not let Hyundai make more EVs of slightly smaller battery, that way more people get to drive an EV and sooner?
60 kWh really does seem to be a sweet spot, decent range at last yet not excessively heavy.
I completely agree that in many cases the 58kWh battery is more than enough. However there are still a lot of places in Europe and the world that do not have any 250kW chargers at all. I have this issue here in the north of Sweden. The route I often drive is 355 km up to our mountain cabin from the coast. There is only one 50kW charger along the route as of today. If it is broken or malfunctioning, I can get stuck (can't get to my destination, can't go back and have to rely on schuko somewhere). So I need range. The Ioniq 5 wouldn't get there in winter unfortunately. This I why I would have preferred an option with 80-ish kWh on top of the standard 58 kWh.
 

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This is one of the main problems. Take tomorrow, I have an appointment in Brighton at 10am which is approximately 115 miles away with about 110 miles of that being motorway. In my HEV, if I stop at all, it will be on the way back for a maximum of 5 minutes for a toilet break. In the Ioniq 5, IF I could find a suitable charger on the route (anything more than 200 metres diversion is too far) stopping for 15 minutes to top up so I can get back to the office would be tolerable. Stopping for 45 minures to an hour is totally unacceptable, after all, I am at work.

If we ignore the last 12 months, my average mileage for the previous 30 years was 40,000 miles p.a. so 230 miles days 3 or even 4 times a week were quite normal. Until the cars and charging network are capable of giving more than 200 miles from a 5 minute top up anywhere, anytime, without fail and all without having to wait more than 5 minutes for your turn, people like me just can't even think about a BEV.
 

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There's 2 battery sizes for a reason. 1 smaller size isn't suitable for everyone. I had an i3 REX and was doing 120 miles a day. I do several trips of over 180 miles each year (parents live on the south coast) And drive to France for holidays instead of flying somewhere exotic. I also tow trailers... I have 2 : 1 small for upto 750kgs and one rated for 1700gks - which has solar and leisure batteries and a 240v inverter, with main outlets - so thats going to work well with the 5. I also buy a lot of 2nd hand stuff online and end up driving long distances if it's high value. Did a round trip to london recently (240 miles) to get a modular sofa. Even if I didnb't tow I'd get the bigger battery... why - because it will last long having to do less full cycles. IIRC they are good for around 1,000 full charge discharge cycles. At 77kWh that's 77,000 kWh or assuming less than the ionic salon maybe optimistic 4 miles per kWh (300/77=3.89) that's 308,000 miles before it needs to be replaced.
For me the biggest issues though... what are you going to do on a bank holiday and all the rapid chargers are full? That extra 80 miles can get you out of trouble and easily to the next 3 sets of rapids.
There's a solution to it which I used in the even before the i3 in my petrol/diesel days.. don't do long distances in 1 go. My daily limit on holiday is 250 miles as it's meant to be a holiday not an endurance race. . Split into morning and afternoon drives with a 2.5 hour limit per stint. Stop somewhere nice for lunch, walk round a park or town etc, then do afternoon stint and arrive early evening. Now I just pick somewhere to stop with charge points.
I do actually drive like that to go to the Le Mans 24 hour but trake an overnight ferry, the sooner they introduce onboard charging the better. But some numpty in an self built EV caught fire in the early days (bad BMS) so now they don't alow it. 6 hours on the regular crossing I take would nearly fill a battery at 7kW. I've asked the ferry company a few times if they plan to introduce charing s - as sat around for an hour before departure would be a great time to get on a rapid! Eurotunnel have them.
 

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Just to add another example... the 58kWh would suit my parents. The longest drive they do is 180 miles up to us. So they could do it in a 58kWh - with a few 50 miles to spare - less in winter! The rest of they time they do no more than 40 miles a day. When I first got my i3 in 2015 there were 3 rapid chargers en route - 2 of which weren't working. Now in 2021 I gave up checking where they are as there's so many - over 30 last time I looked.
 
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