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The Ioniq 5's E-GMP Platform can support 400V and 800V charging infrastructures.

With a 350-kW charger it can charge from 10-80% in 18 minutes and you can 100 km (62 miles) of range with a 5 minute charge.

The Ioniq 5 also has a unique Vehicle-to-Load function that allows you to charge things like electric bicycles, scooters or camping equipment.


Ultra-fast battery charging along with innovative Vehicle-to-Load (V2L) function

IONIQ 5’s E-GMP can support both 400-V and 800-V charging infrastructures. The platform offers 800-V charging capability as standard, along with 400-V charging, without the need for additional components or adapters. The multi-charging system is a world’s first patented technology that operates the motor and inverter to boost 400 V to 800 V for stable charging compatibility.

With a 350-kW charger, IONIQ 5 can charge from 10 percent to 80 percent in just 18 minutes. IONIQ 5 users only need to charge the vehicle for five minutes to get 100 km of range, according to WLTP.

IONIQ 5 also provides an innovative V2L function, which allows customers to freely use or charge any electric devices, such as electric bicycles, scooters or camping equipment, serving as a charger on wheels.

The V2L function can supply up to 3.6 kW of power. The V2L port is located under the second-row seats, and it can be activated when a vehicle is on. Another V2L port is located at the charging port on the vehicle exterior. Using a converter, customers can charge high-power electric equipment. The outside port provides power even when the vehicle is turned off.
 

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The Ioniq 5's E-GMP Platform can support 400V and 800V charging infrastructures.

With a 350-kW charger it can charge from 10-80% in 18 minutes and you can 100 km (62 miles) of range with a 5 minute charge.

The Ioniq 5 also has a unique Vehicle-to-Load function that allows you to charge things like electric bicycles, scooters or camping equipment.


Ultra-fast battery charging along with innovative Vehicle-to-Load (V2L) function

IONIQ 5’s E-GMP can support both 400-V and 800-V charging infrastructures. The platform offers 800-V charging capability as standard, along with 400-V charging, without the need for additional components or adapters. The multi-charging system is a world’s first patented technology that operates the motor and inverter to boost 400 V to 800 V for stable charging compatibility.

With a 350-kW charger, IONIQ 5 can charge from 10 percent to 80 percent in just 18 minutes. IONIQ 5 users only need to charge the vehicle for five minutes to get 100 km of range, according to WLTP.

IONIQ 5 also provides an innovative V2L function, which allows customers to freely use or charge any electric devices, such as electric bicycles, scooters or camping equipment, serving as a charger on wheels.

The V2L function can supply up to 3.6 kW of power. The V2L port is located under the second-row seats, and it can be activated when a vehicle is on. Another V2L port is located at the charging port on the vehicle exterior. Using a converter, customers can charge high-power electric equipment. The outside port provides power even when the vehicle is turned off.
How long would it take to charge the battery if it was 505 discharged by using the type 1 charging. Standard 120v outlet?
 

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How long would it take to charge the battery if it was 505 discharged by using the type 1 charging. Standard 120v outlet?
The spec I read on CarAndDriver.com for the Ioniq 5's battery pack size is 77.4 kWh, and the maximum continuous draw permitted on a 15A 120V outlet is 12A (incidentally the rate at which Hyundai's In-Cable Control Box, aka granny charger, tops out in the North American market).

120V * 12A = 1.44 kW, and the charging efficiency lies somewhere between 80 and 90 percent, let's call it 85. So 77.4 / 1.44 / 0.85 = 63.25 hours, or a bit over 2 days and 15 hours. That said, you'd never use 100% of the battery capacity. If you're plugging in each night after an average daily commute of 30 miles, you'd be recharged in under 8 hours.

Most EV owners will install a Level 2 charger in their home with between 30 and 40 amp capacity, with 32A being common. Charger efficiency is about 90 per cent at the higher voltage, so 77.4k / (32 * 240) / 0.9 = 11.2 hours from 0 (never drive your EV down to zero!) to 100 per cent.
 

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The spec I read on CarAndDriver.com for the Ioniq 5's battery pack size is 77.4 kWh, and the maximum continuous draw permitted on a 15A 120V outlet is 12A (incidentally the rate at which Hyundai's In-Cable Control Box, aka granny charger, tops out in the North American market).

120V * 12A = 1.44 kW, and the charging efficiency lies somewhere between 80 and 90 percent, let's call it 85. So 77.4 / 1.44 / 0.85 = 63.25 hours, or a bit over 2 days and 15 hours. That said, you'd never use 100% of the battery capacity. If you're plugging in each night after an average daily commute of 30 miles, you'd be recharged in under 8 hours.

Most EV owners will install a Level 2 charger in their home with between 30 and 40 amp capacity, with 32A being common. Charger efficiency is about 90 per cent at the higher voltage, so 77.4k / (32 * 240) / 0.9 = 11.2 hours from 0 (never drive your EV down to zero!) to 100 per cent.
I think the battery pack for US is 72.6kw. I would like the 77.3 if it was available.
Why will it not accept a 32amps charge from a 120v 40 amp dedicated circuit giving it then 3.8kw charge?
Level 2 requires a 220 volt dedicated circuit. 32 amp in that case draws 7kw
Are you saying. To charge a dead battery? Using 120v for 15 hours. I pay, bottom line 16 cents per kw. So it would cost me $3.45 to charge it.
 

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I think the battery pack for US is 72.6kw. I would like the 77.3 if it was available.
The IONIQ 5 larger battery is 72kWh (or very close to that) except for the North American market where it will be 77 kWh (or very close to that). So in North America it wall have slightly more range.
 

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The IONIQ 5 larger battery is 72kWh (or very close to that) except for the North American market where it will be 77 kWh (or very close to that). So in North America it wall have slightly more range.
So I had it backwards. Great! The range they give now, is that with the 72.6kw battery?
 

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I think the battery pack for US is 72.6kw. I would like the 77.3 if it was available.
Why will it not accept a 32amps charge from a 120v 40 amp dedicated circuit giving it then 3.8kw charge?
Level 2 requires a 220 volt dedicated circuit. 32 amp in that case draws 7kw
Are you saying. To charge a dead battery? Using 120v for 15 hours. I pay, bottom line 16 cents per kw. So it would cost me $3.45 to charge it.
I've never seen a 40A circuit that's only 120V, but if you had one the limit for a continuous current draw would still be 32A (80% of the breaker rating) and the estimate I gave would double to 22.4 hours to go from 0 to 100 percent charge.
 

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I've never seen a 40A circuit that's only 120V, but if you had one the limit for a continuous current draw would still be 32A (80% of the breaker rating) and the estimate I gave would double to 22.4 hours to go from 0 to 100 percent charge.
You are so correct. 20 amp 120. However I have been looking at Tier 1 chargers and they are very miss leading. It says 3.6kw charging. Then it says 120 volt 16 amps. Well that is 1.9kw. What you said.
 

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Looking into the Ioniq 5 as my first EV and I have some questions regarding the charging as well...

My electrical installation has 3x230V without N / 32 A.
From what I read most electrical cars expect to see a neutral (N), so I assume I will only be able to charge monophase in 230V...

How much current will I be able to charge max in monophase? 32 A?

Can you program the car (or the wallbox) to use whatever is remaining from my other electric appliances?
So max 32A*230V= 7,36 kwh? In the theoretical case that nothing else is using electricity ;-)
To charge 90% of the battery I would need around: 0,9 * 73 kWh / (230V * 32 A) = 8,92 hours?

Does anyone know if you can also program to only charge with whatever is not consumed of the electricity of my solar panels?
I'm working from home a lot of the time, so it would be awesome if I can only use non-consumed solar energy to charge my car...
As I don't like giving it away almost for free ;-)
 

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The info that came out indicates a maximal charging power of 11 kW on a 3-phase connection. That means 16A for a 3-phase 230V connection. So half of your 32A is still available for the other appliances in your house.

There are options to link the charging to your electricity production, for example using a Zappi charging station or from SolarEdge a combination of charging station and inverter.
 

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Thanks Jan!
A smart charging station such as the Zappi charging station seems to be exactly what I need...
You can choose to load only using the energy produced by your solar panels, and it takes into account the load of other electric appliances...

However I'm not sure if I can use 3 phase... In Belgium we have an old-style 3x230V without neutral.
And I already read that a lot of EV's don't support this as they expect to see a neutral.

But I guess I should be able to use monophase 230V / 32A...
Especially as the Zappi wallbox has dynamic load balancing: it takes into account the capacity of 32 A and the consumption of other appliciances...
Which is not that bad as I can charge overnight if needed...
 

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But I guess I should be able to use monophase 230V / 32A...
I don't know about the role of neutral in 3-phase.

If you limit to one phase, I expect you can get 7.2 kW charging power (as long as this phase is not used by other appliances), like the 2020 38 kWh Ioniq can handle.

However, officially you might need to apply the so-called selectivity criterion that demands that every appliance cannot use the full power of the phase. Then, for example, you have to limit the Zappi to 25A which gets you 5.7 kW charging power.
 

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Welkom hier, @Zuinige Rijder!
We already know each other well from the Dutch forum.
Interesting info!
And indeed excellent numbers! Most of the time 10% extra SoC in only about 2 minutes!
 

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Welkom hier, @Zuinige Rijder!
We already know each other well from the Dutch forum.
Interesting info!
And indeed excellent numbers! Most of the time 10% extra SoC in only about 2 minutes!
Those are interesting numbers... On the one hand it blows away it's most immediate competitors (ID.4, Mach-E, Ariya), but on the other hand it's surprisingly sedate for an 800v system. Perhaps the battery pack itself can't handle more, or they're just being somewhat conservative in configuring the charging curve.
 

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Those are interesting numbers... On the one hand it blows away it's most immediate competitors (ID.4, Mach-E, Ariya), but on the other hand it's surprisingly sedate for an 800v system. Perhaps the battery pack itself can't handle more, or they're just being somewhat conservative in configuring the charging curve.
Yes, after the Kona fires it seems they have become more conservative.
 

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Yes, after the Kona fires it seems they have become more conservative.
Hopefully if the I5 works out they'll tweak the curve to be more aggressive (presuming the batteries lack the physical defects they claim are the cause of the fires). Would be a good point to compete with Tesla. Though it's already plenty fast enough for general purposes.
 

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If you are the only driver, charging faster than this does not even give you enough of the recommended rest during longer trips.
 
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