Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I complained to Hyundai Service Website, which is a repository for all their service manuals, about there not being any table of contents that a person could view before accessing the site. The site is pay-per-view or subscription and I told them I wanted to view the Ioniq manuals but didn’t want to fork over $20 to find they weren’t there. I got an email in reply stating that the Ioniq manuals were there and a complementary 7-day trial subscription. I’ve been clicking around in the Ioniq service manuals for the last 5 days. Here’s what I’ve found about the site and manuals in general:

$20 is the minimum access fee. For that you get a week. This is a better deal than the corresponding Kia service website where $19 gets you only 72 hours. The Ioniq manuals comprise several volumes:

Shop manual
ETM (electrical troubleshooting manual)
TSB (technical service bulletins)
DTC (diagnostic trouble codes)

Could you pay $20 and then download everything? I suppose it’s possible but not practical. Small sections of the manuals can be downloaded as pdfs but not major sections and not complete manuals.

I find the shop manual a disappointment. Instead of high-contrast drawings, Hyundai uses mostly low-contrast and low-resolution photos. The photos are often too small and dark to see well and if you click on them to magnify, they go blurry because the resolution isn’t there to support zooming in. Written descriptions of how things work in the shop manual are very sparse and generally lacking. I find the organization and indexing of the information to be poor. That may be my lack of familiarity, but prepare to spend a lot of time looking for the info you need. The shop manual has some electrical schematics.

The ETM is much better than the shop manual. Organization and indexing of the schematics is fairly good. The schematics are in color and the blue type is a hyperlink to a connector drawing, harness drawing, or ground location drawing. You can zoom in without losing resolution.

The TSBs can have surprisingly good service info in them. Some are just official warnings not to do something, like use E-85 fuel. Others contain very detailed descriptions on how to perform certain procedures, like how troubleshoot the infotainment center. Organization and indexing of the info is poor, but it’s worthwhile to click through the TSBs to see if there’s anything regarding your problem there.

The DTCs, again, are poorly organized. Instead of organizing info by the code number, it’s organized by the subsystem so you have to click through and open subsystems till you find your code. (shakes head!) Also, I have not yet found if there’s any way to manually pull codes without a code reader. Usually it’s possible to have the ECM blink the codes by shorting pins on the datalink connector but I’m not finding any way to do that here.

In summary, if you need electrical info to solve your problem, you should be fairly happy with the info in the ETMs. If you need mechanical info, prepare to spend a lot of time looking for it and you may be disappointed. I much prefer a printed manual that has everything in one volume, like Honda’s superb Helm manuals, but I guess service manuals are not done that way any longer.

I'd like to be able to upload some sample schematics and drawings here but the forum's file size restrictions are ridiculously small. I have a couple of days left on my trial subscription. I may be able to look something up for you...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Can you find a way to bypass the hybrid system, ie. use ICE engine only? Would be useful in case you need to charge up a flat 12v aux battery, or in the event the hybrid system malfunctions and you need to get the car to the nearest service centre.

The service guys showed me how to do it during my first 1000km checkup, but it's impossible to remember then. Involves specific sequence of pedals and buttons pressing, like cheat codes on a console.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Silverks, to recharge a dead 12-v battery after using the 12-v battery reset switch, or after a jump (if the reset didn't work) just step on the brake and press the start button. That puts the car in "ready" mode and the engine will automatically start and run as long as needed to recharge the battery.

There's a way to make a 12-v SoC indicator appear on the gauges so that you can monitor the progress of the charge. That may be what you're referring to. To display the gauge, begin with the car off and turn the switch in the fuse box to the left of the steering wheel to "off" and then hit the "start" button. The gauge will appear at ignition on or ready mode.

This info and more is in TSB 17-EE-002. There's lots of very useful tips on how to start your car with a dead battery that every owner should know. I can't post it here (1.2MB pdf) but PM me with your email and I'll send it to you.

This pdf applies to the US Ioniq.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
Is there nowhere on the Internet that you can point to?
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top