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Hypermiling in a Hybrid Gets the Competitive Juices Flowing

my bold below

how many of us recognise this change in how we drive since getting our Ioniqs?

wouldn’t exactly classify myself as carefree when it comes to fuel consumption, but I’ve never been much of a fuel miser either.

Tasked with comparing the 2017 Toyota Prius and Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid, however, I quickly came to understand the allure of these gas-electric rides and the competitive spirit they are capable of stirring. This stuns me as much to write as it surely is for you to read, but there’s a certain sense of excitement associated with such fuel-sipping cars; a tangible feeling of setting and ultimately achieving goals that’s hard to beat.

I’ve driven hybrid-powered cars before, but never did I fully appreciate the symbiotic relationship between man and machine required to realize their full potential. Without changing my driving style much, I expected as-advertised fuel economy and was consistently disappointed when it didn’t come to fruition. Piloting the Prius and Ioniq, however, something clicked. Suddenly I went from disinterested driver to hypermiling mastermind, with efficiency reigning supreme.

Fittingly, my newfound adoration for fuel-sipping started with the Prius. This is the car that put hybrids on the map almost 20 years ago, and it continues to lead the slow-moving charge towards widespread acceptance. Yielding a better-than-expected 59 mpg (4 L/100 km) over our first 100 miles (160 kilometers) together, I was hooked. I suddenly found myself feeling frustrated and annoyed when the gas engine engaged, acutely aware of the impact it would have on economy.

When it came time to switch into the Ioniq, I saw the Prius’ fuel efficiency not just as a benchmark but a challenge. The same initial sample size yielded impressive results: 62 mpg (3.8 L/100 km), better, even, than the advertised 58 mpg (4.1 L/100 km) of the ultra-efficient Ioniq Blue. With each passing trip to and from work, I found myself opting to open the windows instead of running the air conditioning,*accelerating gently at all times, coasting when possible, and waiting for traffic lights rather than charging through them all in the name of fuel efficiency.

When my week evaluating the two hybrids was over, both burned about half-a-tank of gas each, with the Prius finishing at 57 mpg (4.1 L/100 km) combined and the Ioniq 59 mpg (4 L/100 km) combined. And so they were reluctantly returned knowing that their lifetime consumption had become that much better on my watch. No, hybrids aren’t for everyone; they necessitate a conscious effort to be driven effectively and efficiently. Like learning to drive stick, for some*people, it simply doesn’t compute. But I finally understand how easily it comes to others, and how addicting it can be once it does.
 

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Having more time I have now slowed down to about 65mph on motorways, coast often and frustrate other drivers who want to get islands quicker but then do not cope with just avoid braking and making the island to meet the traffic gap.

With the Ionic this will get more important when travelling journeys close to the range to get there without an additional charge. Tried following HGV in a Toyota Aygo today and improved from about 60mpg to 75mpg at motorway speeds.
 

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I agree with the challenge part - that's what immediately happened to me when test-driving both Auris hybrid, and Ioniq hybrid - I immediately found myself eager to see how much mpg I can get, and how to best my previous achievement :D

Very well written article, nice to read!
 

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I find it no trouble to resist the call of the hypermile. The economy is more than adequate when just driven like any other car.

Although I do use the `lift-off-wait for EV-mode-then gently-reapply-throttle` to get the car into EV mode on the motorway, but that's to maintain speed, not reduce it!
 

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Driving 'regularly' I have been getting between 62 and 69 mpg out of my hybrid. I am expecting to have cracked 70mpg on this current tank. I have noticed that my driving style has changed and at times I actively try to make the car run in ev mode. Active cruise seems to be more of an aggressive driver than I.
 

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Driving 'regularly' I have been getting between 62 and 69 mpg out of my hybrid. I am expecting to have cracked 70mpg on this current tank. I have noticed that my driving style has changed and at times I actively try to make the car run in ev mode. Active cruise seems to be more of an aggressive driver than I.
Over this weekend I did a run of just under 200 miles and encountered both stop/start traffic, got caught in a lengthy hold up due to an accident, motored along the Fosse Way (with its steep gradients and twists and turns) and to my surprise recorded 68.2mpg.

I usually employ the tips and tricks for economic driving and since collecting the car on 12th of this month have been observing the 'running-in' advice, etc. My goal is to approach as near as possible to 70mpg and for me this 68.2 was most encouraging.

As I get more used to the vehicle (and given the right terrain, etc.) who knows, I might actually get there!! Loving the IONIC!
 

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my record was 95mpg for a 200 mile run west brom (next to baggies stadium) to kent leaving 5pm arriving home about 9pm down M6, M1 and round north side M25 over Dartford crossing in rush hour :)

did a load of work in Leicester for a major shoe retailer, so know the fosse way well
 

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Wow some of those numbers are insane. Personally I've managed 3.3 l/100 (71mpg) on country roads where the car alternates from EV to gas, but now city driving has taken that down a notch with the stopping and starting, and the cold has dropped my average down to 47 mpg.
 

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Wow some of those numbers are insane. Personally I've managed 3.3 l/100 (71mpg) on country roads where the car alternates from EV to gas, but now city driving has taken that down a notch with the stopping and starting, and the cold has dropped my average down to 47 mpg.
71 mpg in US gallons? Impressive if so. I do better on mixed driving than highway driving myself even though I limit top speeds to 65 mph.
 
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