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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's essential to drive a new car carefully normally for the 1st 500-1000 miles.

Not ever owned a hybrid before (or had a car with a DCT transmission) I am wondering if there are any specifics to be aware of.

I've checked online manual and it refers to the break-in information being on F-9. Can't find it!

I've seen on some sites they don't recommend using cruise control as you need to ensure that the engine is broken in using various speeds and revs.

Anyone have any tips for the break-in process?
 

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Probably goes against most opinions but I drive cars like I stole them. Lubricants these days should stop all that wear and tear etc in my opinion.
 

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drive it normally but avoid harsh acceleration and high engine rpm for the first 1000 miles / 1500km


but I you have to give it a bit of welly to get into traffic now and again don't worry, but avoid constant engine speeds


mine being an ex demo I sure had a "variety" of engine speeds and load in its 900 miles before I got it
 

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ditto what bluecar1 says.

I remember when I got my Prius, that I was especially gentle on the accelerator, and when I was on the motorways, I was 'only' going 65-70mph and watching most cars drive by with the driver and passengers gawping at the car (Priuses were a rare sight in those days!). After a few trips on the motorway, I relented and treated the car 'normally'. Over its lifetime, I have pushed it all the way up to its max speed 108mph a few times, and its CVT rubber-banding does stop you from flooring it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Drove my new baby back from Hyundai Warrington (highly recommended - those guys are awesome).

Took the advice to drive as I would normally.

Used cruise control for a lot of the motorway driving and drove at 70mph.

Adaptive Cruise Control is totally awesome. Never driven a car with that before, but that's a must for any new car!

I'm getting just under 60mpg at present.

Only thing I have an issue with is the air con cents in the back of the car. On mine it looks like there is a surround missing from them.

Is it possible for an existing owner to take a snap and show me what theirs look like?

I will post a pic of mine here once I get over the road trip! Lol
 

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Break-in Period Driving in a PHEV

It's a while later, but same topic; my 2019 PHEV does mention a break-in period on page F9:
"By following a few simple precautions for the first 600 miles (1000 km) you may add to the performance, economy and life of your vehicle. * Do not race the engine * While driving, keep your engine speed (rpm) between 2000 and 4000 * Do not maintain a single speed for long periods of time, either fast or slow. Varying engine speed is needed to properly break in the engine. * Avoid hard stops, except in emergencies, to allow the brakes to seat properly."

Having owned a few Elantras, I know this is Hyundai boilerplate language...but after suffering with a Toyota Corolla that had been test-driven hard and started burning oil at three years of age (we got it for a song, at least), I am respectful of breaking in an engine. I have never kept a car less than 18 years, so it not burning oil at any noticeable rate even after years of driving is a huge plus for me (and I've always managed it, except for that Corolla).

Translating this to a PHEV is a little tricky, though. I don't think the electric drivetrain needs any breaking in (anyone know otherwise?!?), it's the gas engine that needs it. My first 50 miles, the engine hardly ran, because it is springtime (no heat, no AC) and I was running on battery power; the little it did come on, it was almost always at idle. Makes perfect sense for efficiency's sake, but not for breaking in the engine. So, some logistical questions related to breaking in the engine, which I'd prefer to get done sooner rather than later since I do plan to take this vehicle on long trips and want the breaking in done before I have to put it in cruise for a long highway segment:

1) To keep the engine running, I tried sport mode, which does the trick. But the shift points are pretty high, even with a very light foot. I have a "Type A" instrument cluster (p. 3-57) so no ready access to a tachometer. My ear is trained on a Honda engine, so I don't trust myself to know 4000 rpm when I hear it, let alone know if I'm routinely below 2000. Planning to plug in an OBDII port reader that sends data to my phone, but a) does anyone know a way to have the Ioniq (base model) show you engine RPM with a "Type A" (analog speedo) cluster? It seems daft to me that they don't attach it to one of the digital readouts, but I can not find it anywhere. b) Anyone WITH a tach have a good sense for what RPM range sport mode sticks to, for the most part?

2) I'm considering just not recharging the battery until I'm through the break-in period, so that I stay in HEV mode while in drive, with its lower shift points. I don't see a downside to that (save burning gas), but maybe someone knows better?

Thanks in advance!


p.s. For anyone freaking out because they didn't break in the engine, don't panic. With a hybrid the engine generally keeps to the suggested limits pretty well of its own accord, and the RPM variation called for is usually obtained even on freeways unless you are in a very rural area and make almost no pitstops.
 

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Put the OBDII reader on today and sport mode looks like the way to go. It stays below 4000 RPM even with a moderate foot, and normal mode routinely runs at less than 2000 RPM. For others with a new PHEV, I recommend driving in sport mode (to the left of drive on the "gear" selector) for the first 1000 or so miles (rather than 600 per the manual, because some miles will be engine-off even in sport mode) and not making a long highway trip part of that unless you intentionally vary the engine speed along the way (don't just cruise along at a fixed speed for miles on end).
 

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The Hybrid mode (i.e. `Not Sport`) keeps the engine between the running-in limits naturally. You do not drive the car in Sport mode to benefit the short-shift styleneeded for running in.

Bluecar1 summarises the practical experience very nicely - YOU don't `do` anything to run a modern car in - just don't drive it like you stole it for the first thousand miles or so, and the limited use of the ICE will deal with the minor variations in RPM recommended for use. If anyone thinks they know better then please provide confirmation of the results found after stripping and measuring the components at exactly 1,000 miles. If you haven't done this then any advice is nothing but conjecture, speculation and guesswork.

I was a test and development rider and driver for several years, and the ONLY truth we ever got from running-in new cars and bikes was to NOT strip them but not to mess with a properly-running engine... :nerd:
 

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I understand about not gunning or redlining your engine but I can't imagine that it would matter about keeping a certain speed since the engine turns on and off as you drive at a steady speed. So you constantly have various revs and zero revs randomly anyway.
 
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