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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
curiosity cause me to start this thread

I am noticing member in some countries tend to consider cars a long term investment where as other countries look at them as a more short term / commodity type purchase

personally I tend to keep my cars short term about 3 years (my Ioniq hybrid is on a 4 year PCP deal so will probably change it somewhere in the last year), so that I don't have to worry about out of warranty costs, and can have a car with current safety and technology

this costs me slightly more in the long run as I am always paying finance / lease costs but due to increasing economy helps offset some of this

so the question to others is

how long are you intending to keep your car and are there any reasons for the length of time?
 

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I'm signed up to a 2 year lease but would be open to another one depending on my experience with it. Maybe worth setting up one of your polls on this thread?
 

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My intention is to keep it long, maybe at least 7 years or more. From 2013 to 2017 I had a Prius Plug In for 'only' 4 years, as a kind of intermediate because at that time no car like the Ioniq EV was available yet. Before that I had a Corolla G6 from 2000 to 2013.
 
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If I can resist. Two years, then electric.
 

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My lease contract ends in 4 years of when I hit 160k km's. Whichever comes first (in my case: the kilometers first). So in about 2,5 years I'll have to look for another car.
 

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At my age , probably for life ;) . Though with future improvements to the car who knows ?
 

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Exactly the question I've been asking myself. I had been considering a 3 year lease awaiting to learn the cost/terms. I had been expecting technology advancements would be so large that I might want to have a new car in 2020. However, if the lease is not that great, owing for 4 or 5 years might be better. I am currently driving a 11 year old Prius.
 

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I've gone for a 2 year lease, though I almost went for 18 months. This is my first "new" car and I liked the idea of a shorter agreement so I could make sure I'm comfortable with the format in the long term.

Hopefully prices are still competitive in 2 years, so if I like the car I can take out another deal. If I had to decide today I'd get the plug-in next, but 2 years is a long time to change my mind.
 

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I think I will keep this car for 6 years or longer. I'm afraid prices for used electric cars won't be high after three or four years so selling early isn't a good deal. For now I don't have problems with that, but who knows after some years when new technology emerges...
 

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Exactly the question I've been asking myself. I had been considering a 3 year lease awaiting to learn the cost/terms. I had been expecting technology advancements would be so large that I might want to have a new car in 2020. However, if the lease is not that great, owing for 4 or 5 years might be better. I am currently driving a 11 year old Prius.
I did not mention: I am going all electric now (Ioniq electric limited package). The Prius hybrid was great but I hope to never ever buy/lease a gas/ICE vehicle.
 

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I'm in a tough spot... I've always preferred to own vehicles for as long as possible. It seems like the most "frugal" thing to do is buy a car & drive it until it won't drive anymore. I recently fell in love with electric cars, which is rapidly evolving & plagued with battery degradation... things not very compatible with owning a car for a long time. I'd love to own an Ioniq for 5-10 years, if I was confident the battery was going to last that long. I currently own a VW eGolf that I purchased & was planning to use for the "long haul"... but the range (or more accurately the charging time to refill the range) is a pain, even before battery degradation sets in. I'd buy a Bolt with a ton of range & liquid cooling, but it is relatively expensive (there goes the "frugal" argument) & the cargo space is severely lacking. What to do...
 

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I think many people are waiting to see what the battery degradation is at 3 years as to get a rough lifetime of the battery pack to work out if a used 3 year old EV is worth the risk / is a bargain
This brings up a great question. Hyundai offers a lifetime Li battery warranty here in the US. When do they determine it needs to be replaced? When it no longer holds a charge or when it's no longer giving you the mpg you were promised?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
just reading about the e-UP being so expensive for only a 99 mile range

Electric shocker: supercharged costs leave plug-in city car up the creek without a paddle

Want to get an electric car to save money? Don’t think that all plug-in models will cut your motoring bills with low prices and minimal running costs; the Volkswagen e-Up – a city car with a whopping £20,780 list price (after £4,500 of government grant) – could cost you more in monthly payments than much bigger, more upmarket cars.

In fact, PCP finance costs for the e-Up are so high that you could run a substantially larger plug-in model and have enough change to get a petrol supermini.

Worse that this, Volkswagen’s smallest electric car can’t even compete on range – being capable of up to 99 miles between charges – meaning you’ll need to top up more than twice as often than with one cheaper alternative.
 

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This brings up a great question. Hyundai offers a lifetime Li battery warranty here in the US. When do they determine it needs to be replaced? When it no longer holds a charge or when it's no longer giving you the mpg you were promised?
I guess we'll have to wait and see on that one ;)
 

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Very interested thread. As people discussed battery degradation and years, had me thinking about battery replacement. People expect to buy new tires (or other parts) after they wear, why not consider replacing batteries if they start to degrade (hopefully after more than a few years). While todays' batteries are expensive, future replacement batteries are likely cheaper. I don't claim to know the future rather I expect the industry to respond to things like battery degradation, long term ownership, etc. It all is confusing in this era of exponential grow of some things and long lifecycles for others and then the whole issue of the sharing economy ,, hmm think I am convincing myself to lease ...
 

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Very interested thread. As people discussed battery degradation and years, had me thinking about battery replacement. People expect to buy new tires (or other parts) after they wear, why not consider replacing batteries if they start to degrade (hopefully after more than a few years). While todays' batteries are expensive, future replacement batteries are likely cheaper. I don't claim to know the future rather I expect the industry to respond to things like battery degradation, long term ownership, etc. It all is confusing in this era of exponential grow of some things and long lifecycles for others and then the whole issue of the sharing economy ,, hmm think I am convincing myself to lease ...
Here in the US, only people in the Los Angeles area will be able to lease an Ioniq Electric. Others will have to buy & accept whatever battery lifetime they get.

Battery costs will go down over time, but how expensive will a specific battery be that was only in production 5+ years ago? Tires are rather standard, so it is easy to get replacements. Nothing is standard about batteries, so getting a replacement will be very specific (and likely still expensive). How is battery replacement (for those not covered under warranty) going for old Leaf owners?
 
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