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In Technology World No. 9/2018, we picked out five rechargeable hybrid cars of different types, one of which is the newcomer Volvo XC60 T8 Twin Engine AWD. It's relatively lonely in its genre because it has a total power of 407 horsepower and costs a good bit over half a million (and which reliably slows away over $ 700,000 if you put on "little" equipment).

In the test we investigated how far the cars can roll with the electric motor alone as a power source. We drove our selected loop a total of 6.7 miles, which includes a few kilometers of city driving followed by motorways and mixed-country roads with speeds of 50, 70, 80 and 90 km / h. We followed the traffic rush so it was not about a distinctive snow run.
It should be added that the occasion when the Volvo XC60 was driven on the distance, the temperature ratio was slightly different (a little lower temperature) than when the other cars were driven.


In the picture above, as you can see in larger format here, you can see through the gray bars how far each car can run on electricity only according to the European NEDC driving cycle and how far we came to our test loop (marked with the green-red bars ). None of the charge hybrids reached the range of the NEDC driving cycle. However, some were quite close, others not
Link: https://translate.google.no/translate?hl=no?sl=sv&tl=en&u=http://teknikensvarld.se/sa-langt-kan-11-laddhybrider-kora-pa-el-sedan-ar-batteriet-tomt-623138/ ("Teknikens Värld", Technology World Sweden, translated)
 

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I test drove an Optima plug-in before ordering the Ioniq, but back then the sportwagon wasn't available.

Nice car, but lack of boot space (full of battery) and no pre-heat killed that idea!
 

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I drove an Outlander 60 km last year. It was 60% charged. Drove the monster electric for a few km, then motorway. After only 18 km the charge was gone. Tried to drive by and get some speed. Sounded like a wounded lion.

The dealer was independent, but selling almost only new and used Outlanders. Because they was cheap, because of an outdated tax reduction scheme, reducing plugin taxes by percent instead of fixed, and with no regard to electric range.

I was looking for PHEVs at the time. This one almost got me look for other solutions. Until I found Ioniq.

Outlander is the worst car I have ever driven. It also gives plug-ins a bad name. Environmental activists hate them as they are freeloading (?) on the tax system and giving any environmental gain, but the contrary. The good thing is that both opinion and the authorities are beginning to see that PHEVs with less than 50 km real range is not worthy of any, or very little, tax compensation. And marketing of such try to convince buyers that a 4WD 200 HP monster like this what you "need" for "Norwegian conditions" is so bullsh*t.

Sorry, I got myself "started" on this kind of car, a monster, a fake, and everything about a car I don't want. Close to hate it.

The Ioniq PHEV range is from 50 km (worst cases, motorway) to 75 km (best cases, very slow gliding, mostly unrealistic), but usually somewhere in between. Around 60 km without any extremes. 52.1 is certainly lower than what I usually get. The battery contains energy, not kms or miles. As for the fuel tank.
 

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the problem is the prices of plugins and hybrids need to come down, also smaller cars fitted with hybrid / electric drive trains as these are the ones doing the short polluting school runs in towns

the attraction of the Chelsea tractor (large SUV for non UK members) size market for the manufacturers is they have an average emission target across their range so if you can improve the emissions of the big polluting vehicles they meet their targets easier regardless of it actually improves the environment
 
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