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HI Ioniq owners, I have a beef, why did I get 60+ (sometimes almost 70mpg) during my first few fills, then continually go down until the past 15 to 20k miles (in AZ heat) I am struggling to reach 50mpg?

I have had all the regularly scheduled maintenance done, and the dealer has said there are no updates to the computer so what gives?

I have not changed driving patterns, I rarely use the sport mode, but when I do it is for very brief burst to get up an occasional busy entrance ramp to the freeway.

I notice the vehicle struggles to stay in EV mode even on FLAT roads at speeds under 50mph. I have employed the coast to EV method of getting it into the EV before using cruise, but even at 45mph, it goes back to ICE in just a couple of moments, and this happens even when my battery shows 2/3 charge!

I do not sit with my car idling and ac running for extended periods, but something has to be wrong and I wonder if anyone else has had similar experience.

Just baffled, what had me ecstatic the first 2000 to 3000 miles at 60mpg , now has me thoroughly depressed, many times barely achieving 41mpg on a full tank?

I know this car was LESS than a Prius, but I purchased because I wanted the mpg advantage, not because I like Hyundai, and I feel as though the EPA rating on this car's mpg is not realistic, and deceptive considering that is what I based my purchase decision on and the vehicle is NOT achieving it.

Anyone else have over 25,000 miles on their 2018 or 2019 BLUE and have similar mpg?

Anyone find any other reason mpg was limited or having problem with EV mode engaging when battery half or more charged?
 

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2017 Marina Blue HEV Ltd I O N I Q since 25 July '17
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Hi @2019IoniqAZ

I wonder if it might be a battery issue, not holding a charge, thereby running the ICE more; or perhaps a loose connection somewhere in the BMS. Have you consulted your dealership about it?

Most people on the forum report an increase in fuel economy over time. So obviously something is not right.
 

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lots of things affect economy

please add rough location to your profile or signature as I am assuming AZ = Arizona USA?

so you have issues with 50mpg US?

driving style and journey profile are the biggest factors affecting mpg(have you changed your routes ?, are you using sport mode more?)

also thing like AC usage, E5 / E10 gas reduce mpg

repeated short runs with gentle braking tends to lead to the rear callipers stick and causing drag (a couple of heavy brake tests from 50+ mph to 0 usually exercise them and free them up nicely
 

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I agree, something is wrong. That said, Arizona temperatures depending on where you are might not help. Peak efficiency is at 80 to 85 degrees (not considering HVAC use). 110 degrees and AC on full will drop mpg. But even if that correlates with your last 20K miles (unlikely of course), that cannot be the whole story.
 

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Sorry to hear that you’re disappointed. Are you comparing to a Prius that you had driven along the same route in similar conditions?

Being used to a Gen 2 Prius (2008, Touring trim) your mileage actually sounds pretty good. Ours is the best 5.2 L/100 km (about 45 mpg US) in the summer (5.7+ L/100 km or 41- mpg US in cold winter weather with snow tires). That still sounds very impressive to anyone around here who does not have a hybrid!

On very hot summer days, running the AC makes the Prius ICE engine come on pretty quickly when idling at a red light, for example. The car being white and having tinted windows does not seem to help much.

We’ll see how the Ioniq PHEV does.
 

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Sorry, misread your title - thought you were getting 32 mpg. If you have the larger wheels, drive like many in Arizona at 80 mph in 110 degree heat with AC on, getting middle/high 40's mpg seems reasonable. What did you get in similar conditions with your last car?
 

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Some factors affecting fuel economy include:
  • Driving speed (faster is bad)
  • Acceleration (as in more/harder is bad)
  • Deceleration (coasting down is better than hard braking)
  • Tyre pressure (keep them topped up to the recommended pressures)
  • Temperature (extremes result in worse economy)
  • Headwinds/tailwinds (Sometimes due to geography, you can have a headwind on the way to work and also on the way back 8 hrs later)
  • Rain (driving in rainy or wet conditions increases fuel use)
  • Snow (driving in snowy conditions increases fuel use - but likely not a factor for you in AZ)
  • Fuel quality (the higher the ethanol content the higher the consumption - and you probably wont be aware if your gas supplier is changing this, eg, E85 only means up to 85% ethanol, not that it is 85% ethanol. Gas suppliers often play with the blend ratios for various reasons)
  • Creature comfort use (AC, and heater for EV's)
Have any of these factors changed over the past while? A plot of economy over time, similar to Cha above, might yield some clues as to what's going on.

OB
 

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Discussion Starter #10
lots of things affect economy

please add rough location to your profile or signature as I am assuming AZ = Arizona USA?

so you have issues with 50mpg US?

driving style and journey profile are the biggest factors affecting mpg(have you changed your routes ?, are you using sport mode more?)

also thing like AC usage, E5 / E10 gas reduce mpg

repeated short runs with gentle braking tends to lead to the rear callipers stick and causing drag (a couple of heavy brake tests from 50+ mph to 0 usually exercise them and free them up nicely

Again, I used AC the first 5000 miles, drove same paths.. generally flatter terrain here in the Phoenix East Valley, and with 32000 miles, in just 10 months, you know my trips are not the short kind.

I recently took a trip to Cali and Back, 3200 miles overall. Mpg 48mpg, and another longer trip to El Paso Texas and Back, right around 45 mpg, this is RIDICULOUS and pathetic, I am not a lead foot, the car is reluctant to enter EV mode for extended periods of time even when the Battery indicates 2/3 charge. And WHY should we have to decelerate to have it engage in the first place, (I learned that off this forum, that if you have plenty of juice on battery, decelerate a few miles per hour forced vehicle into the EV mode ... then engage the cruise) but what a bunch of BS, the car should give the mileage (or near it) that it is rated, without some secret driving trick etc. and for me, the disappointment is consistent, even employing the "tricks".

I wonder if anyone out here has closer to 50k 75k or 100k on an IoniqBlue yet could chime in, and let me know how they are faring. Because at the moment, the disappointment has me questioning the car's long term reliability as well, and seriously considering selling, even if for a loss, before I get to the 100k and am left with a useless wanna be Prius Competitor that has no resale value.
 

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What is your speed on these trips?What is the temperature? OEM 15” wheels and tires? Non energy saver tires can cost you 3 mpg, and so can the larger wheels.

Yes, there are several methods of “tricking” any kind of hybrid into EV mode and is often mentioned on this and every other hybrid forum.

These tricks are useful at the end of a trip at city speeds. Fool’s game at highway speeds. Just leaving it to the BMS will get you the same results in the Ioniq.
 

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I don't specifically have the Blue trim but I feel I can still chime in. I have the limited trim but it's the same drive-train as yours. I have a bit over 56,000 miles on mine and the mileage has been fairly consistent. For me, reduction in MPG can be attributed to complacency when I'm driving or temperature changes.
 

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32,000 miles in 10 months, that's some serious miles (y) . To me, most of your trips are probably of extended length and at high speed (>70 mph). The sad fact is that in any hybrid vehicle the longer the trip length the closer the mileage will be to a conventional gas car. It's the efficiencies of regen in starting and stopping that generates the added mpg for a hybrid over a conventional ICE. For a plugin hybrid, it's that, plus the "free" electric miles that make it worth it. Extended highway driving negates both of those benefits.

45 mpg (5.2 l/100km) doesn't sound bad to me for extended high speed highway driving. I had a small manual 1.5L Toyota Echo (Yaris) and it got about 5.5 l/100 km (42.5 mpg) on the open road at speed, and it 's a way smaller and lighter vehicle.
 

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The sad fact is that in any hybrid vehicle the longer the trip length the closer the mileage will be to a conventional gas car.
Actually, that's down purely to speed. 70+ mph (120+ km/h) you're going to see much lower fuel efficiency. Long trips, actually generally produce better economy in the hybrid, as my two trips Ottawa-Toronto and back have proved (3.9 & 4.1 L/100 km respectively—the first I was alone and the second with a passenger—versus 4.3-4.7 L/100 km normal driving around the city). And @bluecar1 has also proved this on his commutes having achieved some of the best fuel economy on the forum.
 

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City driving should produce the best results and this is reflected in the government ratings. Medium speed long trips can produce excellent mpg and both have produced great results for me (with the edge going to city driving for me by the couple of mpg the EPA predicts).

High speed long trips that are 90% highway will be the worst result and will approach efficient ICE only mpg. Everything else being equal, even in this worst case scenario, hybrids should still outperform ICE only mpg efficiency because our low powered detuned Atkinson engines are more efficient than standard ICE only car engines. But not by a lot and it is hard to find everything else being equal. In the Ioniq in particular, there is an aero advantage over most cars.

So if this is the OP's scenario, well his disappointment is fully explained. But still doing better than his last car I'd wager.
 

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Steady driving around 45-50 MPH will produce the best results. Stop and Go will be less efficient in any car simply because of the energy wasted by stopping and because it takes more energy to get moving from a stop than to maintain a steady speed. If I drive carefully for an extended period on back roads, I can get 60+ US MPG. If I'm doing city driving or regular 70 MPH highway driving, it's usually in the low 50s.
 

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I don't do a lot of actual downtown in-city driving, nor do I do a lot of freeway driving.. I get my best economy either driving in residential neighbourhoods with speeds around 40 km/h (25 mph) and long-distance driving at speeds around 90-100 km/h (55-60 mph). That said, the majority of my journeys are short semi-rural trips between neighbourhoods within Ottawa at speeds around 80 km/h (50 mph); these give my worst economy, especially when only about 10 km in distance.

That said, let's not forget that the OP said he had not changed any of his driving habits before his economy started to tank. This to me would suggest a possible fault in the BMS.
 

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I don't do a lot of actual downtown in-city driving, nor do I do a lot of freeway driving.. I get my best economy either driving in residential neighbourhoods with speeds around 40 km/h (25 mph) and long-distance driving at speeds around 90-100 km/h (55-60 mph). That said, the majority of my journeys are short semi-rural trips between neighbourhoods within Ottawa at speeds around 80 km/h (50 mph); these give my worst economy, especially when only about 10 km in distance.

That said, let's not forget that the OP said he had not changed any of his driving habits before his economy started to tank. This to me would suggest a possible fault in the BMS.
I am surprised that you get your worst economy on your semi-rural trips at 50 mph. That's when I get my best. The residential neighborhoods around here are littered with four way stop intersections which lower my mileage a little. I do try to accelerate gently in EV mode from stop signs.

I do agree that OP's issue sounds like a BMS or other car issue.
 

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I am surprised that you get your worst economy on your semi-rural trips at 50 mph. That's when I get my best. The residential neighborhoods around here are littered with four way stop intersections which lower my mileage a little. I do try to accelerate gently in EV mode from stop signs.

I do agree that OP's issue sounds like a BMS or other car issue.
50 mph with uncoordinated traffic lights every 3/4 to 2 miles, so lots of starting and stopping in 50 mph zones, and as I said, all under 10 mile trips, so the engine doesn't have a chance to reach maximum efficiency.
 
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