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Hi,
I just bought my Ioniq today and while waiting for delivery i was wondering if anyone had a suggestion for a home charging station.

Thanks

Marc
 

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Hi,
I just bought my Ioniq today and while waiting for delivery i was wondering if anyone had a suggestion for a home charging station.

Thanks

Marc
I'm live in Montreal and we have 2 brands made in Quebec which are very good for outdoor (or indoor). They were made to handle really cold weather (-30ºC)

The 2 brands are EvDuty from elmec (https://www.elmec.ca/evduty-2/) and Flo from add-energie (https://flo.ca/a-la-maison/unifamiliale/g5)


Here is mine
It's the FLO G5
 

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I'm considering the Flo but waiting until I get more experience with L1 charging at home. I may not need L2 except on rare occasions and there are a few public charging stations within 5KMs from my home.

At the same time with the Ontario government incentives, I might get it to never be concerned... added convenience.
 

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Be aware that low power from the wall for charging also means low heating or AC power from the wall when you use preheating or pre-AC.
 
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Be aware that low power from the wall for charging also means low heating or AC power from the wall when you use preheating or pre-AC.
If the car is fully charged and plugged into L1 120v/20A .. does it make that much of a difference to Pre-heat or Pre-AC?
 

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As I understand from another case (see here) a 120 V L1 charging point was only able to offer 1.44 kW power from the wall. In this thread I estimated what power is needed to keep the car at room temperature (22 °C) for different outdoor temperatures. See the graph below.

Assuming these, as you can see, when using only 1.44 kW while having a heat pump (green line) you cannot keep the car at room temperature when outdoor temperature is below -8 °C, and therefore you can not preheat it up to room temperature for those low temperatures by only using the 1.44 kW power from the wall. When you don't have a heat pump but only a resistance heater (red line) you even cannot get the car warm when outdoor it is below +2 °C.

The alternative is that you don't preheat the car (only) from the wall but from the battery. This might cost about 1.5 kWh from the charge and therefore provide about 5% less remaining range.


 

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P.S. Maybe in your case the L1 charging point is able to provide a bit more power than the 1.44 kW as for the other case. Then you can see in the same graph where your limitations would occur (below -10 °C ?).
 

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That is an informative chart Jan. Like PSWilson, I will also be using L1 charger at the beginning, and install the L2 charger before winter comes here in Canada. I have a dedicated 20A supply in my garage which was wired for a future workshop.
 

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That is an informative chart Jan. Like PSWilson, I will also be using L1 charger at the beginning, and install the L2 charger before winter comes here in Canada. I have a dedicated 20A supply in my garage which was wired for a future workshop.
This 20A is that maximal for a short time, or can that be sustained for many hours (up to 20)? There is usually a difference between these two options.
 

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That is an informative chart Jan. Like PSWilson, I will also be using L1 charger at the beginning, and install the L2 charger before winter comes here in Canada. I have a dedicated 20A supply in my garage which was wired for a future workshop.
Hi,

Even if you have a 20A breaker available, the car charger will only draw 12A @ 120V which is 1.44KW. If the car needs more than 1.44KW of power to pre-heat the cabin, it will take the balance from the battery!
 

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This 20A is that maximal for a short time, or can that be sustained for many hours (up to 20)? There is usually a difference between these two options.
Generally, it is for a short time, like initial startup burst. Wiring is rated for a continuous 20A draw, but it is connected to a 20A trip fuse.
 

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So, probably via this connection charging for many hours is only safe at the 12A current level (1.44 kW power level) as indicated in the manual.
 

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So, probably via this connection charging for many hours is only safe at the 12A current level (1.44 kW power level) as indicated in the manual.
The general guideline used is 75-80% of the fuse. That translates to 15 to 16A on a 20A circuit. My guess is car will limit it to 1.44 kW power level.
 

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Correct, safe sustained current draw is 80% of the fuse/breaker capacity. Having a higher capacity circuit does not translate to faster charging as the L1 charger is limited to 12A. Also you want to factor in a 10% efficiency lost. Realistically you are looking at 1.3kW capacity instead of 1.4kW.

In Winter you want to maintain the battery charge level and preheat the cabin. The 1.3kW capacity cannot do both. When you setup the charge timer try to schedule early enough so the battery is fully charged before the preheat kicks in. Depend on the temperature you might need to dip into the battery reserve to finish the preheat cycle and hopefully not that much.
 

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I am hoping to have the L2 charger installed before winter. It may not be before Sep/Oct when the temperatures can be less than 10°C.
 
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