Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi - my IONIQ EV is being delivered at the end of August and I need to order a home charger. I don't have any solar panels - may do down the line but not in my plan at the moment. It will be installed on an outside wall. I just spoke to my electrician (as been having some unrelated work done) and he said he is registered to install them and uses Rolec??? Anyhow could someone please advise which process to follow...the Pod Point recommendation from Hyundai or the Rolec via my electrician or other??? I'm not fussed on cost if I can get one with longevity, reliable, easy to use etc. Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
had Pod point fitted 3 years ago when I got plug-in hybrid,(now have 2020 EV), no problems happy with it, I got the tethered one so that I dont have to keep taking cable from car boot!
To be honest it depends on public chargers that you have in your area and are free to use! I never use home one now as there are 4 locations within easy walk of my house, if you have the same save your money and if you do need to charge at home use the Granny(trickle) charger that comes with car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks I live in the middle of nowhere so nothing close. Thank you. Do you like your new EV?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
I imported a Rolec from the UK when I bought my car 2 1/2 years ago and fitted it myself. It has worked without problems since. My only slight critisism is the timer on it is small and akward to set. Not all models have timers, but I wanted the ability to set a charge time independant of the car scheduler and also choose the level of charge {amps} so went for both those options as add ons. I also went for a tehered cable, which I think is much more convenient than faffing about with the car supplied cable which is better kept in the car for charging away from home.
I believe Podpoint also have a good track record so you need to research the options available on both and choose the one that best fits your requirements.

I'm sure you will be very happy with your new car, once you have mastered the concept of driving EV, as I have been.

There is loads of useful gen on this forum and people willing to help answer any questions you may have, but to get the best out of the forum please add your location and model details to your Avatar or signature as I and others have done.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you - I think I have done what you advised, you should see the details of the vehicle in my signature. I expect I'll go with the tethered Pod Point then, I'll do a little more researching first. Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
love the EV, only problem we have found is getting charge when in some remote locations around the country, always when you plan a trip have a second and third charge point withinin range incase first one is out of service! Download Zap map if not already done, as it gives owner of chargers and costs if any per Kwh. Planned a trip from Warrington to Scotland before lockdown, first stop was at Carlisle "Polar 50kwh fast charge 15p kwh" didn't reconise my RFD card! so on to Gretna services "Ecotricity 50kwh fast charge 30p kwh" wouldn't lock onto car! so onto BP garage still in services "BP super charger 150kwh 69pkwh!!!!" got to Helenbourgh seafront to find 50kwh charger not working! ended up in railway station on 7kwh charger which was free! took 5 hours but not a problem as we were staying in Travelodge 10 mins walk away.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,589 Posts
Thank you - I think I have done what you advised, you should see the details of the vehicle in my signature. I expect I'll go with the tethered Pod Point then, I'll do a little more researching first. Cheers
Welcome to the forum and the wonderful world of EV driving!

Although from a different country, I would suggest considering a charging point that you can handle by an app. Then you easily can start or stop charging (although if Bluelink works well you can use that as well, but then the charging point should already be "on"). Some charging points such as the one from Zappi can handle load balancing of the electrical system of your house. This means that it always uses the maximal available power of your electrical system, while it decreases the charging power if other things in the house need more power, for example during cooking, or when heating or AC in the house is needed.

P.S. The most recent version of Zappi also has the option to charge (as much as possible or exclusively) from your solar panels
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you I will have a look at the Zappi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
i have a zappi , they are a good charger , make sure u get the tethered version
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I have installed a JuiceBox back in 2017, still working great, nice app, WiFi controls all that you need.
I m not sure what the current prices are for the new models, mine was back then something around $950 CAD with the travel package. Probably the new models are even better, though ultimately all they do is regulate the current to the car, regardless of the brand, happy with my 2017. At the time I also got the $1000 provincial rebate, so after i installed it myself the expense was minimal, but that thing is gone now in Ontario.
Anyway, the JuiceBox worked for 3 years so far with no issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
To be honest I use my car for work and have clocked up 25 000km in 9 months. Like you we have 230v in Australia coming out of our standard plugs. I have been just using the granny charger that came with the car and I find it works fine for me.
 

·
Registered
2020 ioniq electric ultimate
Joined
·
13 Posts
Hi everyone.
I was going to start a new thread but thought I'd just add onto this one.
I'm in Canada where we have 110/120 volt outlets. Just picked up my electric ultimate yesterday (Friday). We're planning on not installing a home level 2 charger (we rent our house, don't know how long we're staying, don't know if the separate garage power can handle it...)
We charged starting around 5pm Friday when it was at 15% (dealer sold several EVs Friday and said they didn't have time to fill ours up as they only have two chargers!) - it took until around 8pm to get to 80%, about 27 hours.
I've been reading the manual front to back all weekend and it says I should check the current in the wall power outlet I'm using (and change the amps on the charger to match)... Anyone know how to check that? It was on 12A but I'm worried I could damage the outlet or charger or car if the outlet can't handle it...

Thoughts?
Thanks


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
2017 Hyundai IONIQ Electric Premium
Joined
·
766 Posts
Hi everyone.
I was going to start a new thread but thought I'd just add onto this one.
I'm in Canada where we have 110/120 volt outlets. Just picked up my electric ultimate yesterday (Friday). We're planning on not installing a home level 2 charger (we rent our house, don't know how long we're staying, don't know if the separate garage power can handle it...)
We charged starting around 5pm Friday when it was at 15% (dealer sold several EVs Friday and said they didn't have time to fill ours up as they only have two chargers!) - it took until around 8pm to get to 80%, about 27 hours.
I've been reading the manual front to back all weekend and it says I should check the current in the wall power outlet I'm using (and change the amps on the charger to match)... Anyone know how to check that? It was on 12A but I'm worried I could damage the outlet or charger or car if the outlet can't handle it...

Thoughts?
Thanks


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
I wouldn't worry about the on-board charging module in the car, or the charger. They can handle the current for prolonged periods for charging.
If the outlet is for dedicated use (like a heater or washing machine) on it's own breaker in the fuse box, I wouldn't worry. Do check the fuse value.
If the outlet is part of the general electrical installation with multiple used outlets and lights on it, don't leave it on 12 amps for 24 hours, 3 times a week, because of risk on overheating the wiring and connections.

Maybe checking the actual running current because of the mismatch in charging time/battery level raise,
You could measure it.
You can check the electricity meter if nothing else (switched on) is on it.
You can calculate it from the raise in battery level (65% of 38kWh?) against the charging time and delivered power (110Volt @ 12Amp for 27hours, is 35.5kWh). Also you loose about 10-15% as heat in the charger and battery, so 35.5 × 0.85 is about 30.2kWh was added. This is just an indication and if the voltage drops for long periods the added power also does. The on-board charging module keeps the current steady, so delivered power depends on the local voltage.
Do check if the car hasn't been running the scheduled charging, or has been heating/cooling the car on schedule.
 

·
Registered
2020 ioniq electric ultimate
Joined
·
13 Posts
Thanks... I'm pretty new so I don't understand some of the technical stuff you described. I don't think we'll keep it plugged in for 24 hours very often. More like 12-15 hours most nights.
I'm wondering if I should lower the charger to 10 or 12a (it will charge slower I'm guessing) to avoid potentially damaging the outlet or blowing it. Is that a possibility?
Did your calculations above indicate that it charged just fine at 12a?

Is there a tool I can get at the hardware store to check the current running through the outlet?

Yes it's just a regular outlet- nothing else is plugged into it, though there are a couple things plugged into an outlet on an adjacent wall. Also, neighbours have the garage next to ours so it's certainly possible they have things plugged into outlets on the other side of the wall. (I don't really know the neighbours well.) not sure where the circuit breaker for the garages is as we're only renters and don't know much about the workings of the buildings.

Thanks for all the advice!
Adam


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
110v, 10a makes 1.1kW. (Watts = Volts x Amps; divide by 1000 to get KiloWatts).
In one hour you get 1.1 kWh. (kWh = kW x hours).
At empty, your car wants ~39 kWh (if it's the new model) to get to full, which will take 35 hours. At 50% SOC - half that. etc.

Or, to put it another way, if the car's range is 320 km you get around 9km per hour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
I'm wondering if I should lower the charger to 10 or 12a (it will charge slower I'm guessing) to avoid potentially damaging the outlet or blowing it. Is that a possibility?
Did your calculations above indicate that it charged just fine at 12a?
When I first got my Ioniq, I had to charge on 120V until I got the 240V installed. Running on the factory charger at 12A all day/night is just fine if you have a typical circuit, especially with nothing else really using too much juice. If it ever gets too much, you'll trip the breaker and you'll have to reset it.
 

·
Registered
2017 Hyundai IONIQ Electric Premium
Joined
·
766 Posts
Is there a tool I can get at the hardware store to check the current running through the outlet?
Most simple solution I used was using a power monitor. I use it now when I draw power at friends to pay them afterwards.
It shows voltage, current (ampere), power (Watt) and cumulative energy consumption (kWh). Just look for one that fits the outlet and can handle the current running.
Example, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07VX3PWJX/ref=posts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
When I first got my Ioniq, I had to charge on 120V until I got the 240V installed. Running on the factory charger at 12A all day/night is just fine if you have a typical circuit, especially with nothing else really using too much juice. If it ever gets too much, you'll trip the breaker and you'll have to reset it.
Not necessarily unfortunately, breakers don't often trip until around 3 times the rated amps. If you run 32amp for example through cabling only designed for 16A, with a 16A breaker, the breaker probably won't trip, but your cabling could be at risk of starting a fire.
Some EVSE charge bricks do seem to have some sort of resistance check on the cabling, I had an old leaf, which wouldn't work on an old 10amp extension lead (just gave an error), but fine on a 13amp extension. Not sure the Hyundai one has that circuitry though.
That said though, if your wiring is fine and rated say for 13/16Amp, then drawing 12Amps for long periods should be fine, as long as nothing else is drawing a load. But don't rely on your breakers, they're intended as a failsafe for sudden current spikes, like a short circuit, not for preventing damage from prolonged use of loads exceeding the design spec. If the cable run is in walls too or through thermal insulation, this can also present a fire risk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
636 Posts
I've been reading the manual front to back all weekend and it says I should check the current in the wall power outlet I'm using (and change the amps on the charger to match)... Anyone know how to check that? It was on 12A but I'm worried I could damage the outlet or charger or car if the outlet can't handle it...
The outlet will be on a 15A circuit breaker, the only question is what other outlets are on that same breaker, and is there anything plugged into them that's in use? If the answer to that is no, you're fine to continue charging at 12A.

Example:

At my house there's a single 15A breaker for the two outdoor outlets, the outlet in front is a GFCI one that protects the outlet in the back too as a downstream load. Since we never have anything plugged into the outlet out back, there's no risk for me to charge the car at 12A all the time. If I did forget and plug in a table saw while doing a backyard project as the car is charging out front, the breaker would trip when I energize the saw and that would be that. I'd realize why it tripped, unplug the car, reset the breaker, and continue doing the work. Not a big deal.

The only danger would be if I had a 300 watt halogen work lamp plugged in instead. That would be a 3A load plus the car's 12A, adding up to an even 15. That wouldn't be enough to trip the breaker, but the steady load at the maximum rating could cause the household wiring in the walls to heat up over time. That's the situation that you have to avoid. Just be aware of what else is on that breaker with the car and whether or not it's a steady state load, then adjust the charge current accordingly. You don't want to exceed that 12A total (80% of the breaker rating) with a steady load.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jonboy
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top