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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I am likely to buy an Ioniq some time this year, but I can’t decide between the standard hybrid and the Plug-In coming this fall.

I like the concept of a plug-in hybrid, where a daily commute falls within or close to being within the range of the EV on a Plug-In. Then plug it in at night and do it all over again the next day. On the exceptional days, it becomes a standard hybrid after exceeding the EV limit.

However, my daily commute is around 52–58 miles. One day a week it is extended by another 50 miles. 8–10 times a year I have trips that are about 165 miles round trip (taking me to very rural areas). So it would seem that the 27 mile range would hardly cover my daily needs and that I would be mostly using it as a standard hybrid most of the time. And no, there is no good place to plug in at work.

So, it would seem then that the regular hybrid model might be the more practical choice. However, with the Plug-In, at least 27 miles of my travel distance would be greenhouse gas free. And there are Federal and State tax credits for buying plug-ins (all tax credits for regular hybrids have run out and are not applicable any more). Based on the Prius Prime (which has a similar battery size and capacity as the Ioniq), total State and Federal tax credit would be $5,600. If the Ioniq Plug-In pricing comes in less than the full EV model (the Prius Prime goes for $27,985–$33,985), then that tax credit will basically make the Ioniq Plug-In cheaper than a similarly equipped Ioniq standard hybrid.

One hiccup is the Ioniq Plun-In isn’t available yet—not even specs on trim levels or pricing. So I can’t pre-order it if I wanted to. The Maryland State tax credit expires June 30, 2017. So I will loose out on $1,100 (based on the Prius Prime). The $4,500 Federal tax credit is still a good deal though.

I’ve been driving my 2005 Prius since 2005 when I bought it new. When looking for a new vehicle, I almost went for a Mazda 3 hatchback (I drove a manual transmission before my Prius and I miss that feeling, plus I wanted something more fun than the Prius). However, given that I’ve been driving a hybrid for 12 years, it doesn’t seem right to go backwards. Plug-Ins seem like the next logical step (I’m not ready to go full EV). I just don’t think that I could take full advantage of having a Plug-In with my commute.

The tax credit is nice. But, is there anything wrong with driving a Plug-In mostly as a hybrid? Once I deplete the battery driving in EV, will I be mostly using the gas engine—so more gas than hybrid since the battery is depleted? What are the drawbacks to owning a Plug-In for my situation?

Thanks for you thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I might have to try and figure that out.

For what it’s worth, we have solar panels installed at home as well as a geothermal system for the A/C and water heater. Sometimes during the Spring and Autumn, the power company pays us money.

Although it may sound like I’m an uber environmentalist, tree hugging hippy (I did have long hair back in the ‘80s heavy metal days), I’m not really. I just think that clean air is important and that needless waste is stupid. I also love technology.

With that said, my main reason for going hybrid or hopefully a plug-in, is to continually show support for this technology—to move the industry forward rather than backwards. So while costs are always a factor, I’m not looking to save money by not spending it on gasoline. I’m just looking to lessen our dependency on gasoline in general and to support new technology and efficiencies, but being practical about it too.;)
 

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With this background, which looks a bit similar to my own I think you will be more happy with the PHEV. In your daily driving you will still have a substantial reduction of gas usage.

I had a first generation Prius PHEV for four years. Not only did I drive a lot of my distances on the solar energy from my own solar panels, also for the remaining distances on gas (mostly on higher speeds on highway) it was fairly economical: 1 liter for more than 23 km (55 US mpg). I wonder if the Ioniq PHEV has similar figures. I would expect so, or even better.
 

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I don't think you can go wrong with either choice. Also did you consider the Chevy Volt? It has a range of 53 miles on electric only I believe, but it is a lot more expensive.

I didn't like the Prius, thought the Volt was too pricey, but the Ioniq HEV was perfect for my needs. I'm too lazy to plug in my vehicles daily, so a regular HEV plus the long distance works well for me. The PHEV has a regular lead acid battery, which is a surprise, and the price / availability is unknown.

The HEV is available now, with 0% financing, good discounts, so I think you can't lose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@hybrid angel, when I set up a test drive for the Ioniq in a couple of weeks I plan on making a day of it and test drive the latest Prius as well as the Volt. The Volt is my current second choice. But from what I've read, it's a little smaller in the back and the ICE isn't as fuel efficient. And, like you said, more expensive. But who knows how I'll feel after I see these in person and go for a spin.
@Jan Treur, thanks. Yeah, that's the way I'm leaning. With my daily commute with various driving add-ons, I know that I won't get the full benefits of a Plug-In. However, if I can get the same benefits of a HEV plus the benefits of an EV for at least 1/3 of my primary commute (or all EV for a quick trip to the grocery or liquor store), then it will be worth it. Plus getting the tax credit and other state incentives (like getting to use the commuter lanes, special parking, etc.).

What really needs to be done now is for me to test a few vehicles. Maybe I'll hate the Ioniq and love the Volt. Or maybe the Prius will beat them all. The biggest dilemma is not knowing the full and official details concerning the Plug-In version and having to wait to see it or buy it. The HEV is available now.
 

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Bluecar1, like the cut of your jib....talking Americanese....(calling it Gas not petrol!!) but you forgot to go Yeeeeehhhaaaaaaaaa at the end!!
 

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Bluecar1, like the cut of your jib....talking Americanese....(calling it Gas not petrol!!) but you forgot to go Yeeeeehhhaaaaaaaaa at the end!!
just trying to use their native language, just a minor issue with such an international forum
 

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Don't forget PHEV doesn't have to be driven on battery only, till it's dead, and then on petrol only while charging battery.
You can drive it with electric engine helping petrol engine the whole time, substantially decreasing fuel usage - especially when compared to HEV where battery drains quite fast when brutally accelerating or driving in EV mode.
Especially when your regular commute is above the EV range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks LocoMk700. I knew they can work together, but not in comparison to a HEV. That's good to know.
@titch, Americanese... Haha.
 

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Anyone know if the PHEV has the same overall dimensions as the EV and HEV? I have seen a picture of the PHEV and it looks longer???
 

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I haven't seen any official specs yet, but considering all three Ioniq versions are based on the same platform, I wouldn't expect external dimensions to change.
If I remember correctly, PHEV batteries have been stashed under the boot floor, so you won't have the extra space beneath - ergo nothing that would change external dimensions.

I would rather say pictures were taken with wide-angle lens, hence the wider look. Still, link the article (or pics) if you can, let's see it.
 

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Don't forget PHEV doesn't have to be driven on battery only, till it's dead, and then on petrol only while charging battery.
You can drive it with electric engine helping petrol engine the whole time, substantially decreasing fuel usage - especially when compared to HEV where battery drains quite fast when brutally accelerating or driving in EV mode.
Especially when your regular commute is above the EV range.
Yeah, that's where the extra battery capacity - and hence range off-ICE - is going to be a benefit. It it will also help in the time you can spend on moderate speeds with EV mode active.

I'd go PHEV, providing the extra cost is reflected in the marginal extra savings from battery use.

There's some clever math involved to work it out based on average annual mileage, which will be the constant, offset by the price differential, divided by average battery range between the two choices, plus the `fuel cost` from plugging in for the PHEV. 'Leccy aint free, baby...`

Then there's the additional weight of lugging around that bigger battery, but then things start to get complicated! :confused:
 
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