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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard that the 124 mi Ioniq Electric is a "stop gap" version, and 2018 will have a 200+ mile version (at the expense of some efficiency):

200-Mile Hyundai IONIQ Electric Coming In 2018

So... skip this 124 mile version? I suppose it depends on the situation, so here is my rough situation:

I currently own a 2015 VW eGolf with 83 mile EPA rating. I don't particularly like it... I make 60-80 mile trips nearly every weekend where I need to charge. 124 miles would cover that. I'm thinking the longer I wait, the less my eGolf will be worth as a trade-in... so I should jump in now. However, 3-4+ years from now, will I be kicking myself for now waiting another year for ~80+ miles more per charge? I prefer purchasing & I purchased the eGolf (since I got a very good deal on it late in the model year)...

Curious on your thoughts?
 

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I've heard that the 124 mi Ioniq Electric is a "stop gap" version, and 2018 will have a 200+ mile version (at the expense of some efficiency):

200-Mile Hyundai IONIQ Electric Coming In 2018

So... skip this 124 mile version? I suppose it depends on the situation, so here is my rough situation:

I currently own a 2015 VW eGolf with 83 mile EPA rating. I don't particularly like it... I make 60-80 mile trips nearly every weekend where I need to charge. 124 miles would cover that. I'm thinking the longer I wait, the less my eGolf will be worth as a trade-in... so I should jump in now. However, 3-4+ years from now, will I be kicking myself for now waiting another year for ~80+ miles more per charge? I prefer purchasing & I purchased the eGolf (since I got a very good deal on it late in the model year)...

Curious on your thoughts?

If your circumstances say you will do with 124'then get it. Personally I've gone for the hybrid and waiting for 200 mile
Plus model or even tesla model three.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If your circumstances say you will do with 124'then get it. Personally I've gone for the hybrid and waiting for 200 mile
Plus model or even tesla model three.
Are you a "single car" household? That might also factor into the decisions here... we are a 2-car household & we have a gas car for long trips (e.g. vacation). The plan is to wait out for perhaps 300+ mi EVs to replace our gas car -- going fully electric. This also supports a decision to just "upgrade now" since we have long ranges already covered...

Really it comes down to, how many times will we be needing that extra range & is it worth the cost (delaying purchase, cost, efficiency) for it?
 

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The pricing I've seen for the 124 mile Ioniq BEV is around $30,000. The Bolt is $37,500 for 238 miles. Chances are the price for the 200 mile version of the Ioniq will be close to the current Bolt pricing. If you are willing to pay that much, and don't need the extra interior room or care how it looks, go for the Bolt. By all accounts, it is a much better car in most regards. Faster and better handling. One area where the Bolt may not be competitive is charging (slow) on the road if you take long trips. You should also look at the model trim and the cost of options you want. Traditionally, Hyundai is a better value than GM, but of course discounted prices or negotiated prices could swing a price based decision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The pricing I've seen for the 124 mile Ioniq BEV is around $30,000. The Bolt is $37,500 for 238 miles. Chances are the price for the 200 mile version of the Ioniq will be close to the current Bolt pricing. If you are willing to pay that much, and don't need the extra interior room or care how it looks, go for the Bolt. By all accounts, it is a much better car in most regards. Faster and better handling. One area where the Bolt may not be competitive is charging (slow) on the road if you take long trips. You should also look at the model trim and the cost of options you want. Traditionally, Hyundai is a better value than GM, but of course discounted prices or negotiated prices could swing a price based decision.
You raise some interesting points... I'm not sure why, but I was envisioning the 200+ mile Ioniq to be priced the same as the Ioniq today (which in hindsight, makes no sense). The 200+ mile will likely be an option with a much higher price tag.

The Bolt *might* allow us to take it on vacation, but then its cargo space would be a problem. Also, it doesn't appear to have Dynamic Cruise Control or Lane Keep Assist like the Ioniq does, even as options. DC Fast Charging is $750 extra on the Bolt, which is standard on the Ioniq.

In the end, I'd be paying ~$8000+ for range I'd probably rarely ever use... if pricing is similar on the 200+ mile Ioniq, it'd have that same core problem.

In a few more years, when 250-300+ mile EVs are around $30k (before incentives, which hopefully still exist) -- replacing the gas car with a cargo-friendly EV should finally get us off the pump.
 

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If I've learned anything by being a computer enthusiast and an early adopter, it's that if you want it now, and can afford it, buy it now. There will always be something better around the corner but if you always say you'll wait for the better thing, when the better thing comes out you'll hear that there's something even better coming soon and you'll never be happy because you'll just be stuck in limbo.

The infrastructure is going to improve over time too lessening the need to have higher range. Cars today are becoming more and more technology and less car so the problem is only going to get worse. If it suits your needs now, get it. The tech will change fast, and soon if we're not careful we'll all be buying cars as fast as we're buying new cell phones. If you do decide to buy now, just try to be happy with your purchase for as long as you can and only buy a replacement if your NEEDS change and the car is no longer meeting your needs.

Another thought, do you REALLY believe Hyundai is going to have that 200 mile Ioniq EV in 2018? They've been fantastic sticking to their schedules so far. I honestly believe that was said off the cuff to save face from all the naysayers about the 124 mile range being inadequate to shut them up. Unless that was already in the pipeline and final design stages, it isn't going to happen that quickly. The Ioniq took 11-12 years. If the Ioniq has awesome sales, which it is having so far, there's no need and they'll just work in the extra range over time as tech improves but that's a given. My theory is that their next EV model will be a platform more conducive to bigger batteries and probably start off with the higher range and get here before the Ioniq 200 mile version does. Then again, I could be totally wrong.

Here in the US, the Bolt does in fact have LKAS as an option. Probably one of those not available in all markets deals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If I've learned anything by being a computer enthusiast and an early adopter, it's that if you want it now, and can afford it, buy it now. There will always be something better around the corner but if you always say you'll wait for the better thing, when the better thing comes out you'll hear that there's something even better coming soon and you'll never be happy because you'll just be stuck in limbo.

The infrastructure is going to improve over time too lessening the need to have higher range. Cars today are becoming more and more technology and less car so the problem is only going to get worse. If it suits your needs now, get it. The tech will change fast, and soon if we're not careful we'll all be buying cars as fast as we're buying new cell phones. If you do decide to buy now, just try to be happy with your purchase for as long as you can and only buy a replacement if your NEEDS change and the car is no longer meeting your needs.

Another thought, do you REALLY believe Hyundai is going to have that 200 mile Ioniq EV in 2018? They've been fantastic sticking to their schedules so far. I honestly believe that was said off the cuff to save face from all the naysayers about the 124 mile range being inadequate to shut them up. Unless that was already in the pipeline and final design stages, it isn't going to happen that quickly. The Ioniq took 11-12 years. If the Ioniq has awesome sales, which it is having so far, there's no need and they'll just work in the extra range over time as tech improves but that's a given. My theory is that their next EV model will be a platform more conducive to bigger batteries and probably start off with the higher range and get here before the Ioniq 200 mile version does. Then again, I could be totally wrong.

Here in the US, the Bolt does in fact have LKAS as an option. Probably one of those not available in all markets deals.
Well said.

I was hoping the eGolf would have been the car I could stick with. I considered charge locations & availability, but not enough about charging times. The Ioniq would significantly reduce, if not remove entirely, my need to charge at all on my usual trips.

I stand corrected on the Bolt's LKAS. It is advertised as "lane departure warning" on the Bolt's site:

http://www.chevrolet.com/content/da...-bolt-electric-vehicle-safety-1920x476-01.jpg

Forums say it bounces the Bolt between lanes, which isn't as good as the Ioniq, which actually keeps you centered (from what I've seen & read).
 

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I stand corrected on the Bolt's LKAS. It is advertised as "lane departure warning" on the Bolt's site:

http://www.chevrolet.com/content/da...-bolt-electric-vehicle-safety-1920x476-01.jpg
Look at the specs page. LDW/Lane Departure Warning and LKAS/Lane Keep Assist System are 2 very different things but the Bolt has both. See this page: 2017 Bolt EV Trims: LT - Premier | Chevrolet It shows "Lane Keep Assist with Lane Departure Warning". It is available on the Premier trim with the Driver Confidence II Package.

I paid close attention to those words when looking at the Ioniq because I was a little baffled, and then confirmed disappointed. I saw all of these amazing reviews overseas showing LKAS that got me excited, but the only words I could find in any information about the US Ioniq was Lane Departure Warning; no sign of LKAS. Then when the official US brochure came out, I saw that Hyundai chose not to include an LKAS option on the Ioniq.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I paid close attention to those words when looking at the Ioniq because I was a little baffled, and then confirmed disappointed. I saw all of these amazing reviews overseas showing LKAS that got me excited, but the only words I could find in any information about the US Ioniq was Lane Departure Warning; no sign of LKAS. Then when the official US brochure came out, I saw that Hyundai chose not to include an LKAS option on the Ioniq.
The awesome LKAS was half my excitement for the Ioniq, now gone. I believe I'd be eternally frustrated that I'm driving a car capable of such a cool feature, but purposefully "turned off" just because I'm in the US. Here is to hoping the next year model will include it... :crying:
 

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They are just waiting to see the outcomes of the various lawsuits for incidents with Tesla's Autopilot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
They are just waiting to see the outcomes of the various lawsuits for incidents with Tesla's Autopilot.
If they offered some assurance that it would be re-enabled via an update, or some hackers could enable it... interest might be rekindled, but I'm not getting my hopes up :(
 

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There may be a way to flash the software/firmware from another country, but there will always be unintended consequences unless you can hack the code directly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
There may be a way to flash the software/firmware from another country, but there will always be unintended consequences unless you can hack the code directly.
As intriguing as that sounds... is there any precedent to this with Hyundai vehicles (or any for that matter), or is this purely conjecture?
 

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Any car OS can be hacked. But the easiest route is via an authorized dealer. They may have access to other country updates, or the ability to use an update sent to them by an authorized dealer in another country. Also, your dealer may have access to change certain settings, especially defaults you may hate such as backup tones.

I'm not sure if some manufacturers use open source software, but apps such as Carista can change and customize a lot of settings on some brands that owners don't normally have access to change.
 
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