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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I'm new to the forum.

Looking into owning an electric car in the future! :D

However, I'm wondering about the differences:

As the new line of vehicles will come in three variants: hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric.

What's your opinion?
 

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I am sure that you will get a lot of opinions.
I have driven a hybrid (Toyota Prius) for 6 years. Great vehicle. I traded it for a Toyota Avalon Hybrid, again a great car.

Here is my opinion: the new Prius seems like a fantastic car, great milage, and better handling. I just don't like the looks.
(agreed, that is a personal opinion and some like the looks).
I have never owned a Hyundai, but I see many, many on the road, and owners I have talked too, all praise the car.
I like the looks of the Ioniq (but have not seen one in person). It uses a different hybrid drive train than the Prius. Some praise it, others scoff at it. I am in no rush, so will wait to see what owners report.
I like Hyundai's warranty, and would consider an EV version for my second, in-town vehicle. It will all come down to cost, warranty, and reports from other owners, and naturally, a test drive. I am disappointed in the EV milage, however.
I am at the waiting, researching, and considering phase.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
interesting

I am sure that you will get a lot of opinions.
I have driven a hybrid (Toyota Prius) for 6 years. Great vehicle. I traded it for a Toyota Avalon Hybrid, again a great car.

Here is my opinion: the new Prius seems like a fantastic car, great milage, and better handling. I just don't like the looks.
(agreed, that is a personal opinion and some like the looks).
I have never owned a Hyundai, but I see many, many on the road, and owners I have talked too, all praise the car.
I like the looks of the Ioniq (but have not seen one in person). It uses a different hybrid drive train than the Prius. Some praise it, others scoff at it. I am in no rush, so will wait to see what owners report.
I like Hyundai's warranty, and would consider an EV version for my second, in-town vehicle. It will all come down to cost, warranty, and reports from other owners, and naturally, a test drive. I am disappointed in the EV milage, however.
I am at the waiting, researching, and considering phase.
Thanks for the insightful feedback! It'll be my first electric car, so I'm also taking my time to get more reviews and opinions on it.

It looks like you had a good experience with the toyota series, that's good to know (as my alternative).

Please do share if you find out more about the EV version. I like the design of the hyundai too :) so it's a debate in my head right now haha
 

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Ioniq06
Thanks for your comment.

Yes, IMHO Toyota has mastered the hybrid vehicle. But they do not make an EV, and I think that is what I am interested in.
Toyota does make a plug-in Prius, but the limited EV range is a turn-off for me. That, plus, I do not like the looks.

So, I am waiting and watching.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You're welcome :)

Ioniq06
Thanks for your comment.

Yes, IMHO Toyota has mastered the hybrid vehicle. But they do not make an EV, and I think that is what I am interested in.
Toyota does make a plug-in Prius, but the limited EV range is a turn-off for me. That, plus, I do not like the looks.

So, I am waiting and watching.
That's true. The range are very limited, but do you think they'll start expanding their selection?

Especially with the EV, as it doesn't leave any carbon around and better for the environment (prevents pollution)..

Have you ever encounter any issues with your hybrid?
 

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Ioniq06 - You asked:
Range expectation - I would hope so. Owners of EV's have anxiety over running out of power. We live in the west, and distances are far. a 50 mile range (there and back) just does not get us very far out of our valley. Unfortunately, larger batteries cost $$$. In time, battery chemistry will improve, and the range will get extended, but I don't see that occurring soon.

Re the environment - While your statement is true, in our area electricity is generated by burning coal, so the environment, while important to me, is secondary.

Re Issues - Absolutely none with the Prius. I enjoyed 130,000 trouble free miles, and other than oil change, it never saw the shop except for a recall to reprogram the computer. When I traded, there was no indication of the HV battery degrading; the Toyota Service Manager said that in 6 years working at the dealership, only 2 HB batteries were replaced, and they were both the older G2 (pre 2010) models.
That is why I bought an Avalon-Hybrid. I do not see myself ever buying anything but a hybrid.

Now, regarding the Ioniq, it is too soon to tell. I like the looks.
The Prius uses a CVT transmission, and the Ioniq uses a 6 speed auto. I guess there are pros and cons for both. It is predicted the Prius will do better below 30 mph, and the Ioniq better above. These cars have an electric A/C compressor, brake assist and steering so the engine (called an ICE) does not need to be running to keep the systems operational. Pull up to a light and the ICE shuts down.

Hybrids (plug-in and EV) will not do as well is extreme cold because of the need to heat the interior. Summer they do fine because the ICE is not spinning the compressor. You will also want to avoid high water, and only a knowledgable mechanic should ever work on a hybrid. I think the Prius HV battery is 460 volts. I assume the Ionoq will be similar.

A hybrid is not a "hot Rod" but I am beyond those years. It is quiet, fuel efficient, sufficiently peppy, and has more than enough power to climb the steepest mountain I have ever climbed, and even pass. (We live in the mountains). Drive steady, permitting the hybrid system to function normally, and you will beat the EPA numbers. I have never driven in the "Power" mode.

This is long, and others may disagree, but these are a layman's opinions.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Awesome Review

Ioniq06 - You asked:
Range expectation - I would hope so. Owners of EV's have anxiety over running out of power. We live in the west, and distances are far. a 50 mile range (there and back) just does not get us very far out of our valley. Unfortunately, larger batteries cost $$$. In time, battery chemistry will improve, and the range will get extended, but I don't see that occurring soon.

Re the environment - While your statement is true, in our area electricity is generated by burning coal, so the environment, while important to me, is secondary.

Re Issues - Absolutely none with the Prius. I enjoyed 130,000 trouble free miles, and other than oil change, it never saw the shop except for a recall to reprogram the computer. When I traded, there was no indication of the HV battery degrading; the Toyota Service Manager said that in 6 years working at the dealership, only 2 HB batteries were replaced, and they were both the older G2 (pre 2010) models.
That is why I bought an Avalon-Hybrid. I do not see myself ever buying anything but a hybrid.

Now, regarding the Ioniq, it is too soon to tell. I like the looks.
The Prius uses a CVT transmission, and the Ioniq uses a 6 speed auto. I guess there are pros and cons for both. It is predicted the Prius will do better below 30 mph, and the Ioniq better above. These cars have an electric A/C compressor, brake assist and steering so the engine (called an ICE) does not need to be running to keep the systems operational. Pull up to a light and the ICE shuts down.

Hybrids (plug-in and EV) will not do as well is extreme cold because of the need to heat the interior. Summer they do fine because the ICE is not spinning the compressor. You will also want to avoid high water, and only a knowledgable mechanic should ever work on a hybrid. I think the Prius HV battery is 460 volts. I assume the Ionoq will be similar.

A hybrid is not a "hot Rod" but I am beyond those years. It is quiet, fuel efficient, sufficiently peppy, and has more than enough power to climb the steepest mountain I have ever climbed, and even pass. (We live in the mountains). Drive steady, permitting the hybrid system to function normally, and you will beat the EPA numbers. I have never driven in the "Power" mode.

This is long, and others may disagree, but these are a layman's opinions.
Wow that was a very thorough review.

Thank you kindly!

Most definitely, now I know not to get the EV if it's for long distance. Seems like the plug-in is the way to go for long distances.

WOW that's pretty good with the minimal servicing the hybrid required! :eek:

Well I do live in Canada and our winter is so unpredictable, it's nuts. I guess it'll be like a spring/summer/fall car huh?

Last thing I want is to be stranded during the winter times because the car won't start.

I do travel alot for work but it's mainly like the downtown core area, not sure if it's a good ideal to be driving in the rush hour.... :eek:
 

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I'm sure that Hyundai won't sell you a car that won't start in cold temperatures. That seems close to illegal in a country where the winters are quite cold.
 

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I'm sure that Hyundai won't sell you a car that won't start in cold temperatures. That seems close to illegal in a country where the winters are quite cold.
Exactly, after all car makers do cold weather testing, extreme cold weather testing, as well as the other way around so it's almost something we won't have to think of here IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Exactly, after all car makers do cold weather testing, extreme cold weather testing, as well as the other way around so it's almost something we won't have to think of here IMO.
I sure hope they do extreme cold weather testing lol... :D

Last thing I want happening is to be stuck in the negative 30s-40s... :|

Any negative encounters with the hyundai that you ever had?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm sure that Hyundai won't sell you a car that won't start in cold temperatures. That seems close to illegal in a country where the winters are quite cold.
I sure hope that's the case. lol

Did you ever have a problem with it?
 

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IMO BEVs have so many negatives it's better to ask why anyone would want one rather than why not buy an electric. Why spend more money on a car with much less utility? Even if electric cars cost the same as a hybrid or ICE, electricity is a more expensive fuel than gasoline in many markets right now (including mine). But even if electricity is much less expensive than gasoline, and you'll never want to go outside that 50 mile tether, you still have massive depreciation for BEVs.


Model Est. Retail Value 7/2015 Est. Retail Value 7/2016 Forecasted Loss of Value Annual Depreciation

2013 Nissan LEAF SL $14,900 $7,650 $7,250 48.70%
2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV $7,950 $4,400 $3,550 44.70%
2013 Tesla Model S Performance $74,000 $52,600 $21,400 28.90%
2013 Chevy Volt $18,600 $14,800 $3800 20.40%


Just not seeing any justification for owning one at all.
 

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If you live in a busy city and have the sort of infrastructure that support the current state of the EV market, then it will be a good move. If you work for a bank, I know the parking lots of some bank buildings have free EV charging parking spots. So anyone in a city with a big financial core would benefit. It's just benefit you'll see over a long, long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
IMO BEVs have so many negatives it's better to ask why anyone would want one rather than why not buy an electric. Why spend more money on a car with much less utility? Even if electric cars cost the same as a hybrid or ICE, electricity is a more expensive fuel than gasoline in many markets right now (including mine). But even if electricity is much less expensive than gasoline, and you'll never want to go outside that 50 mile tether, you still have massive depreciation for BEVs.


Model Est. Retail Value 7/2015 Est. Retail Value 7/2016 Forecasted Loss of Value Annual Depreciation

2013 Nissan LEAF SL $14,900 $7,650 $7,250 48.70%
2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV $7,950 $4,400 $3,550 44.70%
2013 Tesla Model S Performance $74,000 $52,600 $21,400 28.90%
2013 Chevy Volt $18,600 $14,800 $3800 20.40%


Just not seeing any justification for owning one at all.
WOW! Thanks for the break down.

That's crazy comparison of the depreciation value... ****...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you live in a busy city and have the sort of infrastructure that support the current state of the EV market, then it will be a good move. If you work for a bank, I know the parking lots of some bank buildings have free EV charging parking spots. So anyone in a city with a big financial core would benefit. It's just benefit you'll see over a long, long time.
Thanks for the tip! It didn't even cross my mind on that. But yes, I've seen quite a few charging stations, but I don't think I've seen them at the bank buildings...

Do you currently own an EV car?
 

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I don't really see charging stations around. They could be underground or something but I don't recall seeing any.
 

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I have only seen one highway charging station, and it is for Tesla. Isn't it a shame that the manufacturers can't standardize the connection to make it possible that all cars could charge at the same station. What if gasoline nozzles would only fit a specific brand? IMHO, EV cannot ever me universally accepted until there is a "universal" method to charge.

Disclaimer: I could be wrong. Maybe they already are standardized.
 

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I have only seen one highway charging station, and it is for Tesla. Isn't it a shame that the manufacturers can't standardize the connection to make it possible that all cars could charge at the same station. What if gasoline nozzles would only fit a specific brand? IMHO, EV cannot ever me universally accepted until there is a "universal" method to charge.

Disclaimer: I could be wrong. Maybe they already are standardized.
I think that they are working on doing this now. It is under way though not implemented yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I've seen a few charging station underground parking and some near the outdoor public parking areas. Not too many but there is :)
 

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Thanks for the tip! It didn't even cross my mind on that. But yes, I've seen quite a few charging stations, but I don't think I've seen them at the bank buildings...

Do you currently own an EV car?
I don't but remember seeing chargers in the parkade of some bank buildings.

Friend of mine that work for JP Morgan said their bank installed chargers.

I think it's only expected that companies that big encourage it, even big tech companies are doing it.
 
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