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Discussion Starter #1
I'm often disappointed in the fuel economy when driving around on gas engine only. It seems worse then what a normal gas engine car would do. Is there parasitic loss to the hybrid system that I'm not aware of or something?
 

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May I ask what you class as disappointing? What are you expecting? Are you able to give us a geographic location in your details as ambient temperature has a massive impact on the efficiency of these cars.

If I cruise for 400 miles on the motorway at 55mph, I can easily get into the very high 60's/low 70's mpg (UK). Cruising at 60mph gives an easy 65ish mpg, while 65mph gives 62-64mpg. Depending on where I'm going, all of these can be bettered if the road is flat(ish). Yet when I drive the 2 miles to work on a cold morning with the ICE running all the time, I'm probably getting no more than 25mpg. All of this adds up to an average in the low 60's for the first 5000 miles/2 months of ownership, which is almost double what I was getting from my previous Outlander PHEV that hadn't been charged for the last 2 years/70,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
For instance today on a half mile stretch in town on level road I was getting below 25mpg at 35 mph. It was cold about 35 deg F. Wouldn't a normal car with a small 4 cylinder be getting 35+ in that scenario?
 

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If this was within your first 5 minutes or so of starting the car, then no that mpg is what you'd expect from anything. If, however, you'd been driving for 20 minutes and the car was properly warmed up, why was it running on ICE anyway if the road is flat and you were only doing 35mpg?

Now for the cheeky bit, and please don't take offence as none is meant, did you cover that half mile at an average of 35 by standing on the throttle to zoom away from lights, race up to 40 then stand on the brakes to staop at the next set of lights? These cars need a very steady, light throttle, almost 'driving Miss Daisy' style to get the best from them.

Also, 1/2 mile at just above freezing is a bit unfair. As I said, when I drive to work on a cold morning I too get about 25, but my average over 5000 miles is more than 60mpg (UK). That surely is the important number rather than what I get over a few hundred yards?
 

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Hi @Ironic Ioniq, have a look at this Fuelly page specifically based on 60 individual Ioniq Hybrid Limited models like yours.


Even the worst case of 6.3 L/100k is still 37.33 US MPG, not great, but that's the worst.

Best result is 3.7 L/100k and 63.57 US MPG which is pretty darn good given the size of our cars IMHO.

They say that patience is a virtue, although admittedly not always easily embraced. Just keep track and let the tankfuls and miles add up, then take your average once a year, you'll feel better for it. Or do it on Fuelly or the like, it's very easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If this was within your first 5 minutes or so of starting the car, then no that mpg is what you'd expect from anything. If, however, you'd been driving for 20 minutes and the car was properly warmed up, why was it running on ICE anyway if the road is flat and you were only doing 35mpg?

Now for the cheeky bit, and please don't take offence as none is meant, did you cover that half mile at an average of 35 by standing on the throttle to zoom away from lights, race up to 40 then stand on the brakes to staop at the next set of lights? These cars need a very steady, light throttle, almost 'driving Miss Daisy' style to get the best from them.

Also, 1/2 mile at just above freezing is a bit unfair. As I said, when I drive to work on a cold morning I too get about 25, but my average over 5000 miles is more than 60mpg (UK). That surely is the important number rather than what I get over a few hundred yards?
I was using cruise control ... but it was within the first 5 minutes of the drive. I will try to remind myself not to over analyze fuel economy until the engine is up to temp.
 

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I'm often disappointed in the fuel economy when driving around on gas engine only. It seems worse then what a normal gas engine car would do. Is there parasitic loss to the hybrid system that I'm not aware of or something?
The instantaneous gas mileage when you are not in EV mode is almost meaningless because sometimes the engine is doing extra work charging up the battery pack. You get back the energy later in your drive when the powertrain computer decides it is time to go electric or electric -aided driving. You can see when this is happening by selecting the hybrid system display on the screen.
 

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Agree, but there is some utility to the instantaneous readout. I notice a substantial bump in mpg after an upshift around 37-39 mph. Thus I have learned to get to 40 mph briskly. On occasion I can see it jumping up and down a bit at a steady cruise controlled speed. I've also learned at that point if I cut down my speed 1 mph, it will generally go into EV mode. Which I do under certain conditions if I think I know better than the algorithm - for example a long slight downslope of a mile in length and extra battery charge. Of course, I drive in hybrid mode full time since the HEV is what I own, but the same utility applies to a PHEV owner conserving plug in miles for later in the trip.
 

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Agree, but there is some utility to the instantaneous readout. I notice a substantial bump in mpg after an upshift around 37-39 mph. Thus I have learned to get to 40 mph briskly. On occasion I can see it jumping up and down a bit at a steady cruise controlled speed. I've also learned at that point if I cut down my speed 1 mph, it will generally go into EV mode. Which I do under certain conditions if I think I know better than the algorithm - for example a long slight downslope of a mile in length and extra battery charge. Of course, I drive in hybrid mode full time since the HEV is what I own, but the same utility applies to a PHEV owner conserving plug in miles for later in the trip.
Yes, agreed as well @yticolev, I've noticed several similar points with my PHEV, particularly in Manual Sport Mode for the additional charging when I'm in HEV Battery Maintenance Mode anyway. Edit: or wanting the ICE running at a consistently higher coolant temperature for "better" cabin air heating.

I find this either when shifting manually myself at the minimum acceptable 1,500 to 1,700 RPM to accomplish the shift versus considerably higher by algorithm or by accelerating in Auto Sport Mode just past the algorithm's shift point and then settling back to cruise in the higher gear at a far lower RPM.
 

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Can't agree that Sport mode will ever yield energy savings. Using it to specifically charge the battery by burning gasoline can never gain. As far as acceleration goes, you can duplicate that without being in Sport mode with the energy wasting stuff that goes along with that such as holding a lower gear longer and reluctance to appropriately go into EV mode (in hybrid mode setting).
 

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Can't agree that Sport mode will ever yield energy savings. Using it to specifically charge the battery by burning gasoline can never gain. As far as acceleration goes, you can duplicate that without being in Sport mode with the energy wasting stuff that goes along with that such as holding a lower gear longer and reluctance to appropriately go into EV mode (in hybrid mode setting).
Perhaps I didn't make myself clear @yticolev, I'm use Sport Mode occasionally to supercharge my traction battery when in HEV Maintenance Mode anyway for later, slower speed EV city use or for providing more cabin heat by keeping the engine coolant at a higher consistent temperature. Each to their own, be it comfort or climate, yes?
 

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Your car, do as you wish! Just pointing out that it is not efficient to burn gas to "supercharge" or simply charge battery. If this is not pointed out, it confuses others. There have been numerous posts suggesting using sport mode to charge the battery. Misleading at best.
 

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Thank you, let's agree to disagree then. ;)
 

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I'm not disagreeing with anything you have said so far that I'm aware of, just saying that burning gasoline to charge your battery it is not efficient. Your prerogative to do so of course. Perhaps gas is cheaper than electricity in your part of Canada? Still not getting why you would want to burn money otherwise.
 

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Perhaps gas is cheaper than electricity in your part of Canada? Still not getting why you would want to burn money otherwise.

Sometimes some people spend more for a 4 star hotel than they would on a 3 star hotel.
Would that be burning money.
Once in a while, not often, I like a bit of sport mode. Not because I think I'm being efficient. Each to there own.
 

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I'm not disagreeing with anything you have said so far that I'm aware of, just saying that burning gasoline to charge your battery it is not efficient. Your prerogative to do so of course. Perhaps gas is cheaper than electricity in your part of Canada? Still not getting why you would want to burn money otherwise.
If I travel 70-80k+ in a day my Plug-in battery runs down and goes into HEV Battery Maintenance Mode after around 47k, so I'll be pretty much running on HEV anyway. By selecting Sport Mode and driving diligently as I've described, I can quick charge and have enough built up in 10 -15 minutes to get myself the other half way home again, returning to base at 10-15% battery, which is effectively zero remaining, since anything below 15-17% requires HEV to run and never gets battery above that level, only maintains at that SOC unlike Sport Mode which charges to 99%.

I also find that I can run the ICE at a hotter engine temperature in Sport Mode and better warm my cabin, plus hopefully burn off some condensation in the engine.

I may burn a bit more fossil fuel in Sport Mode, but overall I'm not so sure it is really that appreciable, if I keep my foot out of it and keep the revs low as I can, it doesn't take so much effort IMO.

As you can see in the attached pic, I do like my cabin warm and except on short trips as has been discussed, my mileage while not exceptional in the winter months, is reasonable considering I do not top up by plugging in every time I drive, which would of course be better, but I get lazy from time to time too.

Sorry to be messing with an HEV thread with Plug-in info. but hopefully some might find it helpful.
 

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Today, for about 1/2 mile I was driving along at 45 mph on ICE only, no EV, and gas mileage was showing close to 50 mpg(US). It's rare, but it happens occasionally. The engine was warm and the battery charge was low.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
This is sort of what I'm looking for. Are there sweetspot speeds that get great fuel economy on ICE only? Like 45 mph?
 

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I had to go out today, despite the lockdown, and made the 150 mile round trip to where my autistic son lives in a special supported unit (I didn't go in or get within 20 feet of anyone), which combined with my last two trips there at a cruise control regulated 65mph (UK) have given over 63 mpg (UK). Before the lockdown I had to travel to the Midlands for work, which forces me to go through the 20+ miles of roadworks on the M1 at the imposed 50mph, so as I entered them I reset everything and activated cruise control. After the 20 or so miles, my screen was showing about 76 mpg (UK)

There is a sweet spot, but it depends how far you can travel at that speed to get the best from the car, but just as important is how level the road is. Cruising at 50mph in the hills of Snowdonia, will never be as fuel efficient as driving at the same speed across the Fens of East Anglia. Personally I prefer a speed where the car can mostly put itself in top gear without struggling, which in my part of the South East is probably around 50 to 55mph.

However, there is also the question of whether it is actually safe to drive in the most economic manner. You try gently accelerating to 50mph and then staying there on the M25 during the day and every truck known to man will cut you up without a second thought, the same applies if you try to conserve fuel on the North Circular in London, but then it will be the cyclists and moped riders taking your paint off! (I kid you not)
 
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