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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fuel consumption per country or continent.

I'm using Fuelly.com (in succession to Mr. B) and Autoweek.nl to register the fuel consumption of my Ioniq Hybrid.

What cached my attention is the fact I'm one the worst scorers on Fuelly (mostly British) and one of the best on Autoweek.nl.
What do we think is causing this?

- The Dutch (including me) are not very economical drivers
- British fuel is of better quality
- The Ioniq is tuned differently on different continents
- Roads and traffic are more fuel-eco friendly in Britain than in The Netherlands

Or is this based on too few cars to see any difference between countries?
 

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currently to few data points to give conclusive verdict, only 3 Netherlands members on fuelly but 2 of you in the mid 50's mpg,

UK and US have an avg 5-10 mpg above netherlands

my excel sheet just crashed and lost the data, but will try and recreate later
 

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currently to few data points to give conclusive verdict, only 3 Netherlands members on fuelly but 2 of you in the mid 50's mpg,

UK and US have an avg 5-10 mpg above netherlands

my excel sheet just crashed and lost the data, but will try and recreate later
Maybe because its so flat there that the car spends proportionately most of its time on ICE because there are less downhills to provide recharge?
 

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Maybe because its so flat there that the car spends proportionately most of its time on ICE because there are less downhills to provide recharge?
that was one thing that I thought as well, but with too few data points you can't draw a conclusion

but also the Ioniq is good at charging the battery on the flat as well

I also find ACC is not as good as a gentle right foot and reading the road ahead at getting good economy
 

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that was one thing that I thought as well, but with too few data points you can't draw a conclusion

but also the Ioniq is good at charging the battery on the flat as well

I also find ACC is not as good as a gentle right foot and reading the road ahead at getting good economy
I agree! but it does use the ICE to charge on the flat so there has to be some net reduction in mpg over using pure ICE I am sure?

I find ACC good so long as you read the road ahead and pull out before you slow down too much but would have to agree with you..I have only really used ACC because its so relaxing but must try without to compare. I dont doubt you for a minute...it is a bit heavy footed when regaining speed but thats sensible IMO as if you are on the motorway with ACC at 65 and slow down to 50 then if the road suddenly clears (ie you pull out) then you are going to want to get back up to speed quickly
 

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in the menus there is a setting for ACC and how quickly it accelerates, I have mine set to "Slow" and it is much better, no more changing down and taking off rapidly under ACC
Ahhhhh...I have he setting on normal I think. Didnt realise that is what it did...I may try that.

I think if you use the throttle yourself then it will override the ACC acceleration and do it at the rate you are pushing the pedal beyond the current speed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would think more hills are be bad for fuel economy. Up-hill, you are using more energy than you can regenerate when going down.
What goes down, must come up (or something like that).

I too have ACC (it's called SCC, Smart Cruise Control on my display) on the slowest reaction time, but mostly I cancel the 'smart' part of the CC. It tends to brake just at the point where I want to switch lanes to overtake.

I think it's really too few cars to compare countries, but still it can be interesting to know.

Maybe it's the quality of fuel. I'm not sure but I think more bio-fuel is mixed with fossil fuel in the Netherlands. I know there is a discussion on fuel elsewhere in the forum and maybe I should try a few fill-ups of Shell V-power or BP-ultimate to try myself to be sure.
 

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I would think more hills are be bad for fuel economy. Up-hill, you are using more energy than you can regenerate when going down.
What goes down, must come up (or something like that).

I too have ACC (it's called SCC, Smart Cruise Control on my display) on the slowest reaction time, but mostly I cancel the 'smart' part of the CC. It tends to brake just at the point where I want to switch lanes to overtake.

I think it's really too few cars to compare countries, but still it can be interesting to know.

Maybe it's the quality of fuel. I'm not sure but I think more bio-fuel is mixed with fossil fuel in the Netherlands. I know there is a discussion on fuel elsewhere in the forum and maybe I should try a few fill-ups of Shell V-power or BP-ultimate to try myself to be sure.
The jury's out as to whether or not premium fuels are any benefit to Atkinson Cycle engines , but they may benefit Turbo aspirated engines . I tried running my last car on V Power for a while and it made absolutely no difference to the fuel economy . Of course my engine may have ended up cleaner and my bank account lighter ;)
 

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small hills seem to be good for mpg, from what I see, inclines up to 2km long are ok, I have a steep 1km uphill and a 3km down slope and the car loves it, coming the other way it is break even on mpg
That's what I find too . One other thing is I'm finding that some inclines where I had to go to ICE before the car is now remaining in EV . Not steep one's of course . Maybe my driving style is changing though I don't think so
 

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like me I am seeing similar,

also noticing regen braking on lift off only seems to retard car more, slopes it would pick up speed with lifting off, now it seems to slow slightly

some of it is the battery charge, the higher the charge the steeper the hill it will climb, so if you driving style is giving you better battery charge before you get to the hill that could explain it
 

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like me I am seeing similar,

also noticing regen braking on lift off only seems to retard car more, slopes it would pick up speed with lifting off, now it seems to slow slightly

some of it is the battery charge, the higher the charge the steeper the hill it will climb, so if you driving style is giving you better battery charge before you get to the hill that could explain it
You may be right on the second point . I do tend to use the Pulse and glide more aggressively when I know that there's a up slope approaching . Accelerate above the speed limit , keeping my beady eyes open for spoilsports , and foot off to regenerate and coast as far as I can
 

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I would think more hills are be bad for fuel economy. Up-hill, you are using more energy than you can regenerate when going down.
What goes down, must come up (or something like that).
You are absolutely right. However, you are missing the bigger picture. Hybrids and EVs with regenerative braking recapture a portion of the energy spent going up the hill. Thus hybrids of equivalent weights and aerodynamics will always outperform similar ICE cars that capture zero energy for energy efficiency under hilly conditions.

Hybrids also work well in city environments that have a lot of stop and go for the same reason. In the Netherlands, someone who spends 99% of their time at steady highway speeds will not have an advantage over ICE cars. In fact, unless there is an aerodynamic advantage, a hybrid may have less efficiency due to typically higher weight and some extra inefficiencies when cold.

Dutch owners who have to slow and speed up during a good bit of their road time (most of you right?) will still win with hybrids. Just not as much as city stop and go drivers or drivers in hilly areas.
 

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like me I am seeing similar,

also noticing regen braking on lift off only seems to retard car more, slopes it would pick up speed with lifting off, now it seems to slow slightly

some of it is the battery charge, the higher the charge the steeper the hill it will climb, so if you driving style is giving you better battery charge before you get to the hill that could explain it
Yep I noticed this to....more charge = time in EV that otherwise would be on ICE.

I guess also that as the car is not 100% efficient uphills would use more energy than you regain on downhills....As others have said, using the brakes is where you win as it harvests energy that would otherwise be lost.

We are obviously better drivers here in the UK can be the only answer :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
We are obviously better drivers here in the UK can be the only answer :)
Or the landscape and infrastructure of Great Britain fits the Ioniq better.

The only hills we have here in the west of the Netherlands are viaducts and aqua-ducts (lots!). Not a long enough down-hill part to profit from.

Maybe I should come to England for a holiday with my Ioniq.
 

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I live in a town which is very hilly, about 1/3 flat, 1/3 uphill and 1/3 downhill. In my previous car I would be using the engine all of the time on the flat and uphill and using my brakes going downhill while the engine was on. Now I drive mostly in EV on the flat, part EV on the inclines and am in full EV recharging the battery using regen braking going downhill. Win win win all the time.
 

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I live in a town which is very hilly, about 1/3 flat, 1/3 uphill and 1/3 downhill. In my previous car I would be using the engine all of the time on the flat and uphill and using my brakes going downhill while the engine was on. Now I drive mostly in EV on the flat, part EV on the inclines and am in full EV recharging the battery using regen braking going downhill. Win win win all the time.
And he's also got really fit and strong pushing his car up all those hills to save money >:)
 

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I see four factors that could interfere in fuel economy differences between European countries.
- Biofuel ratio. I don't know about NL, but in France biofuel ratio is 10%, i.e. twice that of the UK
- Motorway speed limit. Beyond 120kph, the Ioniq fuel economy drops down. I believe the motorway speed limit is now 130 kph (81 mph) in the NL, like in France, vs. 70 mph (112 kph) in the UK.

There are two other fuel economy drivers that may come to play between European countries, but maybe not between UK and NL:
- Climate. A mild "oceanic" climate with relatively sweet winters and relatively cool summers should help the Ioniq's fuel economy. Whereas a continental climate like in Central Europe doesn't help: cold winters mean cold battery and less efficient winter tires, and hot summers mean a lot of AC
- Default wheel size. In countries where upper Ioniq trims are sold with 17'' as standard wheel size, average Ioniq fuel economy should be lower.
 
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