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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid First Drive | Review | Car and Driver

Mileage takes a big hit at around 13% versus lowest trim hybrid (EPA rated in the US for combined 51 mpg versus combined 58 mpg). Pretty disappointing, but looking at the photos, it appears their test car was fitted with the less efficient 17" wheels. If so, the more accurate comparison with the hybrid is a combined 51 mpg versus combined 55 mpg, or about an 8% hit. Either way that makes it tough to see a financial benefit for 25 miles or so plug in power.

This review (not necessarily the car) was also disappointing in two other areas. No mention of an increased regenerative braking mode like the Ioniq EV or the Prius probably means it won't have it. Also no mention of any change in load area, something I'm highly curious about. Not a single picture with the hatch open (and seats folded). A picture of a level load floor similar to the hybrid would have done it.

I'm going to wait for more reviews, but I'm likely going to pass on the plug in version.
 
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It all depends on the distances you drive. Comparing the efficiency when driving with an empty battery only on fossil fuel is not a fair comparison. At least you can drive in EV for all distances up to 25 miles, so if your daily driving fits in those distances you will not use any fossil fuel at all. Whether or not you will have an advantage depends just on that. Only if you mainly drive long distances, for example, of 100 or 150 miles, or more, the efficiency loss compared to the normal Hybrid (probably mainly due to extra weight because of the battery) will be a disadvantage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There is a reason why PHEVs do not sell well (except for the Volt whose higher EV range fits more use cases). I will say that it rather remarkable drop in mpg from just an added 200 pounds. That too will vary. For example, in the Netherlands a driver with a light foot may get better than predicted mpg. In hilly countries, perhaps less: I'm not sure of the weighting of the EPA tests for elevation changes, meant to look them up yesterday for that very reason to get an idea of underlying efficiency.
 

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Yes, the Netherlands with its many flat roads is ideal for EV driving.

I also think that the difference in efficiency for ICE driving between the new Prius and the new Prius PHV is less than for the Ioniq Hybrid and PHV, so indeed there is a question why.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You are right, I didn't think about comparing the efficiency hits with the Prius. The Car and Driver review that I linked described the EPA ratings of the Ioniq PHEV and did not say they were estimated. But they may well have been as I cannot find the Ioniq PHEV on EPA's site. Since as far as I know, they haven't released the PHEV to any market (expecting Europe will be first though), these cars are still being prototyped and cannot have valid mpg figures yet.
 

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Usually the EPA figures are known to the manufacturer before they can be found on the Website from EPA, so probably they are correct but will officially be announced by EPA later.
 

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There is a reason why PHEVs do not sell well (except for the Volt whose higher EV range fits more use cases). I will say that it rather remarkable drop in mpg from just an added 200 pounds. That too will vary. For example, in the Netherlands a driver with a light foot may get better than predicted mpg. In hilly countries, perhaps less: I'm not sure of the weighting of the EPA tests for elevation changes, meant to look them up yesterday for that very reason to get an idea of underlying efficiency.
Yeah...the drop in MPG is very disappointing. Seems like the Prius Prime has it solidly beat there.
 

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Second PHEV review:
New Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in hybrid 2017 review | Auto Express

Not much in the article actually. The things to note are the pictures which people in this thread were asking for.

Also, this paragraph was of interest to me:
You can cut the petrol engine out of the equation altogether with a new feature for the PHEV; there’s now a button that forces the Ioniq to run in EV mode, with a claimed zero-emissions range of up to 39 miles.
I must note that's with the British ratings, since in the US it only has 27 miles electric range.
This was a concern of mine in the preview videos I saw. Press too hard on the accelerator and the gas engine would start up. My objective for in-town driving would be no gas use whatsoever.
 

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If the C&D report is accurate about not being able to lock out ICE operation when the battery is fully charged, that would be a deal-killer for me. I'm not looking at the plug-in at all because I don't need or want the extra battery, but if you have it, I would think you'd want to use it as far as possible before starting the engine. It's not good to cold-start an engine, and once started, you should warm it fully. It's very perplexing that Hyundai would have their PHEV operate in such a way that the engine can start at any time when the battery is fully charged.
 

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Maybe there's a failsafe to prevent ICE/EV switching unless the ICE is warmed up ? Not enough details in that very scant review to judge yet
 

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from the videos I have seen then no you can't lock out the ICE, BUT the ICE only starts with a full battery if you put your foot fully to the floor so the car starts the ICE to give the extra power the drivers right foot is asking for

under normal driving it seems the ICE don't engage until the battery runs down to a predetermined level

this to me makes a certain amount of sense
 

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I remember similar discussions about the first generation Prius Plug In. Reviewers of a car are often not driving normally. They just want to try out things. Also for that Prius Plug In many complained about not being able to keep it in EV. But when I had it, I drove it in EV all the time. It never went to ICE without my intention. Usually it only went to ICE for a few minutes once every 200 km, because that is programmed to keep the ICE in a better shape.
 
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