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https://theqtimes.com/kia-after-the-niro-a-second-electric-suv-expected-for-2018/9654

Battery of 46 kWh and autonomy of 300 km
Latest model that will join the concessions by the end of 2018: the Kia Stonic electric motor. The Western crossover of the KX3 co-produced by the manufacturer and its partner Dongfeng for China, the small crossover will take over the electric traction chain inaugurated last year by the Hyundai IONIQ sedan . But if the engine block of 88 kW / 120 hp will be preserved a priori, it will not be the same for the lithium-ion battery of 28 kWh. According to our colleagues Site PushEVs who interviewed a spokesman for the South Korean firm, the battery capacity should be increased to 44-46 kWh. A surplus of onboard energy which, According to the US EPA homologation cycle close to reality, should allow this second electric SUV to travel 300 km on a single load. If the launch of the Kia Stonic is expected for the second half of 2018, its presentation in the form of a concept could come in September at the Frankfurt Motor Show .

HYUNDAI IONIQ : launched in Europe last autumn, the highly efficient Hyundai IONIQ electric sedan is expected to benefit from this new battery running from 2018. From a capacity of 28 kWh to 46 kWh, the first zero emission Series by the manufacturer could display a range of 322 km (EPA cycle).
 

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so, 64% increase in batterycapasity (28 to 46kWh)

= 15 % increase in range? (280 to 322km)

And where do they put a battery that will be bigger in volum? Less boot space?

Or is not "EPA cycle" 280km?
 

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Does this mean you can swap your current battery for a langer one after 2018?
 

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Does this mean you can swap your current battery for a langer one after 2018?
Would put money on the answer being no. Larger battery etc

The article wording is vague.
 
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I'm guessing it will be possible to upgrade if you want, in a few years time. It's not necessarily bigger, it will probably be more compact per kWh and more efficient. Let's not forget the first computer took up a whole room. And look at them now! :D
 

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Don't know. It also depends on how easy it can be swapped. Will you need to disassemble half of the car or is it easier......
I guess they'd rather sell you a new car ;)
 

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I highly doubt you'll be able to upgrade the battery. It will likely be a different shape & not fit. Also, as pmiddeld said, they'd rather sell you a new car -- they have no motivation to make the batteries backwards compatible.
 

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According to this article on pushEVs

https://pushevs.com/2017/04/24/huawei-honor-8-pro-high-energy-dense-battery/

phone batteries are now getting to 710 Wh/L, which is triple the density of first generations EVs, and double the density of the update i3's. so if the Ioniq's current battery is something like the updated BMW i3's battery (357 Wh/L), they could theoretically put a 46 KWh battery in the same physical space as the 28Kwh version if they can get a density of ~590 Wh/L. (Assuming I did the math correctly) - which means they could either swap it out, or that the longer range version might not mean a significant price increase.

It might not be so easy to swap them out though, since I would expect a denser battery to run hotter on charging and discharging, so Hyundai might need to switch to a better thermal management system, ie. liquid cooling.

That's an assumption though, does anyone know if denser batteries generate more heat? Or is it just a factor of the amount of electricity going in or out?
 

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It might not be so easy to swap them out though, since I would expect a denser battery to run hotter on charging and discharging, so Hyundai might need to switch to a better thermal management system, ie. liquid cooling.

That's an assumption though, does anyone know if denser batteries generate more heat? Or is it just a factor of the amount of electricity going in or out?
Probably it mainly depends on the power levels that are used. Bigger batteries can be charged at higher power levels, and there will be a temptation to do that. If a bigger battery is charged at 100 or even 150 kW power level, then it may generate more heat than at 50 or 70 kW.
 
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