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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
http://2017-hyundai-ioniq-electric-review.blogspot.ca/2017/05/finally-canadian-pricing-for-hyundai.html

From the Press Release:

Hyundai Canada announces pricing for Ioniq Hybrid, Electric



World’s first vehicle platform with three electrified powertrains improves access to low- to zero-emissions mobility
Ioniq is fitted with the latest connectivity and active safety features



May 1, 2017 - The new 2017 Hyundai Ioniq is the world’s first vehicle offering three electrified powertrains and enters the market competitively priced at $24,299 for the Ioniq Hybrid and $35,649 for the Ioniq Electric. The Hybrid model will be available at Hyundai dealers across Canada while the Electric model will be primarily available at dealers that have installed charging stations and located in provinces with government purchase incentives, namely Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia. Hyundai dealers offering the Ioniq Electric can be identified at www.HyundaiCanada.com.

Pricing for the Ioniq Electric Plus plug-in hybrid will be announced closer to that model’s on-sale date in late 2017.

With a choice of hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and all-electric powertrains, Ioniq not only improves the access to low- to zero-emission mobility but also delivers an uncompromising design and driving experience while offering the latest connectivity and safety technologies.

The Ioniq Hybrid starts at $24,299. The hybrid combines a highly-efficient 1.6L gasoline engine with a powerful 32 kW electric motor for impressive performance and fuel efficiency. For unmatched responsiveness, it also features the first-ever 6-speed Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) in a hybrid vehicle. Thanks to its parallel hybrid powertrain architecture, the Ioniq Hybrid can run on the gasoline engine, electric motor, or both, even at highway speeds.

The Ioniq Electric starts at $35,649. The powerful, 88 kW motor is powered exclusively using energy stored in the vehicle’s 28 kWh Lithium-ion Polymer battery pack. On a full charge, Ioniq Electric offers up to an estimated 200 km of emission-free driving.


  • [*]SE: $35,649

    [*]SE Cold Climate Package: $36,849

    [*]Limited: $41,849
 

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The Ioniq Hybrid starts at $24,299.
Interesting. The base Niro L model is $25,129 Canadian. A very different pricing strategy than the U.S. where the base Niro FE is $22,890 and the Ioniq Blue (base model) is $23,035.

I wonder if it has something to do with different margins and discounting strategies in the two countries. But effectively, both Hyundai and Kia are making 20% less in Canada than America on MRSP when it gets turned into Korean Won. I may be missing one significant item though, I've seen freight charges listed at something like $1,800 in Canadian forums and appear to be hidden on dealer sites.
 

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Seems like it's a good price, as it's right in range with the LEAF. Except that it's a better car than the LEAF, and offset by the fact that the LEAF is currently getting pretty good discounts.

I wonder if Hyundai is going to come out with leasing options for the Ioniq? I could see financing it for 7 years to get the monthly payment down, but how much is it really going to be worth at that point, when the EVs available then will all have much more range?

I think I'd prefer to get a lease, so I could replace it in 3 or 4 years, and not have to worry about repairs.
 

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I'm not really worried about repairs, just the advancement in the EV game and what is to be shown in the next 5 years or so. Even by 2020 we should be seeing a lot of new players in the game.
 

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I'm not really worried about repairs, just the advancement in the EV game and what is to be shown in the next 5 years or so. Even by 2020 we should be seeing a lot of new players in the game.
That's true, the EV should be fairly repair free. And yes, there will be a lot of new players in the game at that point.

I guess if you could still theoretically trade in a car with a few years of financing left, but I wonder how much you're going to get hosed on that? It's hard to calculate because we don't know how much EVs are going to depreciate, depending on whether or not the provincial rebate is still available at that point.

2012 Leafs seem to be $12K-$17K, so if you finance over 7 years, and try to trade in after 4, you might have around $12K left on the financing, so you'd likely not get much on a trade in at that point. Assuming I'm correct about that process. I'm just guessing really, I've never bought a car from a dealer before.

Ah well, the Ioniq looks like a great car, so it might be ok to commit to having one long term, instead of worrying that much better EVs are just around the corner.
 

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I put together a quick comparison (attached screenshot) of EV models, comparing the US prices vs. the Canadian conversion.

The Ioniq Electric is quite a bit higher compared to other EVs. It's even high compared to the Ioniq Hybrid.
 

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I put together a quick comparison (attached screenshot) of EV models, comparing the US prices vs. the Canadian conversion.

The Ioniq Electric is quite a bit higher compared to other EVs. It's even high compared to the Ioniq Hybrid.
There might be something to do with exchange rates and / or NAFTA involved with that difference. Maybe Hyundai has to pay extra duties because the cars are manufactured outside of NA?

Hyundai might also be trying to price in exchange rate volatility. Just guesses really.
 

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Hi,

First time poster.

I think that the price for the US Ioniq is incorrect. Granted, the US Hyundai site shows the price for the Limited to be $32,500. However, you have to add the Ultimate Package ($3,500) to get the same model as the Canadian Ultimate model. Now, the comparison will be US $36,000 vs CDN $41,849, or %16.25.

Of course, I am not working with the exchange rate. If we were to compare apples to apples, we would have the following (unless my math is wrong):
The Canadian dollar is worth 0.7289 (02 May 2017). US $36,000 would translate to CDN $ 49,389.

So, the Canadian price of CDN $ 41,849 is actually not too bad.

If we were to look at the price for the Bolt, we would have:
Bolt (base model): US $37,495 converted to CDN $: 51,440
According to chevrolet.ca, the list price is CDN $ 42,895.
Again, the Canadian price is not bad at all.

Andre
 

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I'm not sure you are doing the math in the right direction! In U.S. dollars, a car priced at Canadian $41,849 is about $31,387. Thus in terms of the sellers net return in Korea, they are selling it for a lot less in Canada. So Canadians do have the best price, but perhaps discounting in the U.S. will eventually level the playing field.
 

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Actually, I was calculating things from my vantage point, as I am Canadian and looking to buy an Ioniq here in Canada.

I am not sure how much of a discount we can get here (as in negotiating a lower price at the dealer), when purchasing a new car that is in short supply.
On the other hand, several provinces have incentives to buy electric and hybrid vehicles.
In Ontario, we get a $14,000 rebate (after tax) for the Ioniq, and we also get a small break on the purchase of a home charger and its installation (max $1000).
 

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I'm not sure you are doing the math in the right direction! In U.S. dollars, a car priced at Canadian $41,849 is about $31,387. Thus in terms of the sellers net return in Korea, they are selling it for a lot less in Canada. So Canadians do have the best price, but perhaps discounting in the U.S. will eventually level the playing field.
Agreed that if you consider the exchange rate, the Canadian MSRP is cheaper than the US. The problem is our tax in general is higher than the US and our salary is just at par with our US counterpart so our purchasing power is over 30% less than Americans so even though the Canadian price is theoretically lower than US, in reality we are paying quite a bit more in terms of your after tax disposable $$
 

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One could argue who has the best purchasing power endlessly. Higher Canadian income taxes support the health care that Americans pay for out of pocket - actually overpay for compared with everyone else.

What I don't get is the different profit margins for Hyundai. American versus Canadian purchasing power is almost entirely irrelevant for that question.
 
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