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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone tell me if using the fast charge too often would damage the battery. I plan to fast charge mine twice a week, just wondering if that is to much.
Thanks
 

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Every different type of battery chemistry has own fast charging characteristic. What i known in common is that lithium polymer batteries has higher C-value. It tells how much charge and discharge current battery can handle per its energy capacity. We have seen that Ioniq is very good at fast charging power (70kW in Björn Nyland's video - 100kW promised by the factory) so it has good c-value. So i would say that all the chargers that are under the 70 000 Watts are not fast chargers at all for the Ioniq perspective. Other words you can fast charge Ioniq much more often than any other electric car in wearing point of view.

Ioniq electric is only EV that uses lithium polymer chemistry so nobody has experience how much and how long it will handle high currents. Except factory if they have made proper tests and time simulations. Hyundai promises good 200000km/8 year warranty for the battery so no doubt they have made some tests.

There was warnings about fast charge when Nissan Leaf was introduced. It has (least in theory) worse/slower battery chemistry than in Ioniq. Many people were saying that Leaf will last 1000 fast charging cycles - i had 3000 fast charging cycles and there was only usual time based (common average is 2% per year) battery degradation. It is a battery management system inside of the car that manages charging according to safe and long lasting limits i.e if there is too hot weather the car will charge (yes actually the charger will obey the car) with less current and take longer time. So the lithium based EV users should not worry about the fast charging at all. There are wrong associations of over/under charging EV probably because of it was/is possible i.e. with lead acid batteries/chargers.

It is fact that the fast charging stress battery more than slow charging. This is also mentioned in the Ioniq user manual not to fast charge too often.

I also know that mode3 AC-charging was balancing battery cells better than mode4 DC-fast charging in Leaf so it is not only matter of the stress but better battery care with slower AC-charger.

If the current is too high it does not matter if the battery is charged or discharged it may wear/break in both. So i would say that do not accelerate or drive high speeds too long time and too often to save your battery from wearing.

Summary: twice a week is not too much. Do not worry. This all has been taken into account when the Ioniq was designed. Use it as you wish - it will last - leas the warranty time/mileage :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Javamik, dealer said I was not to fast charge too often telling me this he made me think that I had made the wrong choice in buying an EV. Thanks you have put my mind at rest on this issue.
 

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Still wondering what that warranty exactly means. When will they replace the battery? My dealer had no satisfying answer. Do you know how this works in your country?
 

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it all depends on whether that warranty is transferable, or like the US the unlimited warranty is only for the first owner


if only the first owner, there will be very few long term warranty claims a few people keep a car more than 3-5 years
 

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This is the first time I heard a percentage. And 80% is generous, many brands only guarantee 70%.
 

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Was it Tesla that didn't have a degradation standard posted or something in terms of warranty replacement? I've heard varying ranges depending on manufacturer.
 

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Interesting, thanks Jan.

It looks like there's not a huge difference between AC level 2 and DCFC on the batteries.

First impression is wow, they both lost quite a bit of range, but then I realized that those were early version LEAF batteries, which didn't do well in hot climates like where the test was conducted. I believe Nissan fixed the issue in 2013.
 

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Don't use cable for 175 kW chargers

See at https://electricrevs.com/2019/01/26/...-safety-issue/

.. “at a charging station on a test site of a customer in Germany, a short-circuit occurred with a HUBER+SUHNER cooled high-power charging cable. Nobody was injured in this incident. The short-circuit occurred in the plug. The cooling circuit with the synthetic, non-conductive coolant can be ruled out as the cause. The product in question is a first-generation prototype.“
Worldwide charging for all chargers >150 kW with such liquid cooled cables will not be supported until the issue has been clarified. The cables can still be used for 50 kW chargers.
 

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Thanks Javamik, dealer said I was not to fast charge too often telling me this he made me think that I had made the wrong choice in buying an EV. Thanks you have put my mind at rest on this issue.

Sorry to say Dave, your dealer is a mis-informed cretin.
There is no battery performance loss in the Ioniq because never mind what the gauge says, it holds a margin in reserve, so it doesn't charge to 100%...
An informed dealer would know this and turn it into a USP, not an apology.
Your car is perfectly safe to charge twice a week

Time to change your dealer before he f--ks your car?
 
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Don't use cable for 175 kW chargers
See at https://electricrevs.com/2019/01/26/...-safety-issue/
Worldwide charging for all chargers >150 kW with such liquid cooled cables will not be supported until the issue has been clarified. The cables can still be used for 50 kW chargers.
It seems that the issue was clarified now. Messages have been sent by Fastned that these cables can be used again for 175 kW chargers.
 

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Hi Daveg,

I've been charging my Ioniq at about 70% - 80% using my solar panels and the trickle charger. I wondered if the battery cycle needed to be more than this so I did some searching. Most if not all websites agreed that avoiding deep discharging and charging little and often was the best for prolonging battery life. (Anyone else have an opinion on this?)

Do you know roughly what your battery charge will be when recharge?
 

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From what I've read, keeping the battery between 20% and 80% is recommended for battery longevity. (Apparently the optimum is to cycle between 65% and 75%, which is not particularly practical). However, there is one caveat to the whole don't charge to 100% rule. Our batteries need cell balancing once in a while, so you do need to charge to 100% periodically. (I do it once a week, but I've read that monthly should be OK too). Also, Hyundai recommend L2 charging over L1 charging (at least here in North America).

OB
 
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Hi OB,

I should imagine the optimum charging cycle looks like a bell curve, with 65% to 75% at the peak. Interesting point about cell balancing, I hadn't heard about that. Only driving locally, 65% to 75% is doable for me, so I think I might adopt this approach. Thanks for the input.

Alan.
 

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Well, if Hyundai holds to their claims in the lifetime battery warranty, then I am not sure that I care! Charge away. If it shortens the life a bit faster (which is going to happen regardless), then I guess I get a replacement a bit sooner than I would otherwise.

In reality, I will be >90% of the time level 2 charge at home, but will not be worried about it. Same as with worrying about keeping it between 20-80% charge. Nope, just gonna top it up.

We shall see!
 
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