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Here is my two cents worth -- It's all about reducing friction. Someone already wrote drifting behind a truck and also driving slowly. That has the most affect on increasing the range. There is also increasing the tire pressure, closing all the windows and the sunroof and waxing the car but that probably has minimal effect.

Cheers,
 

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But coasting will only give you distance and not extra charge. There has to be a reason why my daily commute is the same no matter what regen level I drive on. Thoughts?
I think there's your answer. Coasting = distance. Energy use = distance. Less energy use / distance = win.

I've discovered driving differently by going to regen 0 on the flats and it coasts a lot better and drives a lot better without having to put my foot more on the 'gas' pedal. With regen 1 on, I have to use more effort, which surely must be using more energy.

My daily commute is a short 7km mainly uphill in traffic in the mornings (boo) with downhill no traffic in the evenings (yay). Long distance is @75% flatish, 25% hilly. I've not noticed a huge range change when driving with cruise control on or off.
 

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Here is my two cents worth -- It's all about reducing friction. Someone already wrote drifting behind a truck and also driving slowly. That has the most affect on increasing the range. There is also increasing the tire pressure, closing all the windows and the sunroof and waxing the car but that probably has minimal effect.

Cheers,
I hope you mean `drafting` not `drifting`... >:)

As we've expounded many times the car is very aerodynamic compared to most but drag increases as a square of the speed, so nocking just a few miles per hour will have a disproportionate effect. As does fixing sticky-out things to a sleek bodyshell.

Drafting trucks is a fraught with risk and compared to the reward, probably not a good idea. While the truck does punch a hole in the air it creates turbulent flow behind it that actually increases drag for following vehicles and the variability of the relative wind and impact of other road conditions. In practice this means that every truck is different, the optimal distance varies not only between every vehicle but also the same vehicle depending on wind speed, direction and nett cross-flow.

The test is to draft a truck versus drop back and travel 2 mph slower than the truck. See which gets better fuel consumption.

Tire pressure is another `olde worlde` misnomer. Set the pressures to the correct pressure, nothing else. There's a couple of PSI variation to cater for load, but the car and tire manufacturers have done a far more authoritative job than the owner can ever do when it comes to testing all the combination to arrive at their recommendation.
 
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One thing I'd mention is that keeping your top speed down is a useful energy saver. Because the air drag frictional losses go up as the square of your speed, you will use more energy driving half a trip at 49 mph and then the other half at 51 mph, than you would doing the whole trip at exactly 50 mph. And doing half at 40, and the other half at 60, is worse still. Reducing speed from 50 to 30 makes a useful saving, but the opposite, increasing from 50 to 70, loses far more than the gain from 50 ->30 reduction. This shows up in the occasional very long steady descents on some bits of M'way in north of UK; suppose you're at the top of the hill; you could coast down, regen=0, and let's suppose your terminal speed is 70 mph. So you coast down at 70 for a mile or 2, and no energy is going into your battery. At the bottom of the hill, all you have is the stored energy of your car at 70 mph, which will get you only a short distance up the next climb before you slow to 50 and have to apply the accelerator. If instead you had coasted down the hill at a steady 50 with regen=1, chances are you'll have recovered far more energy than the car on its own doing 70; you'll have to apply accelerator immediately to keep going at steady 50, but you'll have more in the battery overall. It's a slower descent, but more efficient as a result.

Best of all is to regen=1 down at 50 for almost all the descent, then regen=0 a 100 metres or so from the bottom and build up speed to say 65, before climbing the next hill & letting car slow very gently & steadily at 50. Smoothness is the goal, plus not doing any miles at any air-speed greater than you need to. High speed = very high rate of loss of energy to the surrounding air. Which is why I like the radar-controlled lorry-following technique, as this is reducing the air-speed acting against the car's forward motion.
 
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