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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone found ways to extend their EV range? One specific situation I am baffled by is driving up hills. No matter if I go slow or turn on regen I still spend the same amount of battery by the end of the hill. If anything driving faster seems to work better, less time under load.

Cheers
George
 

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yes, only saving grace is you can make up for it going down the hill. i live on one, still average 5-5.5 mi/kwh, depending on my need for A/C these days. i currently stick with normal driving mode, 0 regen unless i have to stop at a light.
 

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The hypermiling technique called Driving-with-Load may help a bit, especially when going up and down repeatedly. This is like heavy traffic does: going uphill you let the car decrease speed and going downhill you let the car increase speed. With the increasing speed when going down you easily go uphill for the next climb. Mountainbikers also know to apply this very well.
 

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Hypermiling gets my range to around 260km per full charge. I dont drive really slow or anything but where I can be very economical I will. On the motorways sometimes I will stick behind a truck and get some drag from it, not all the time but if im not in a hurry I will.
 

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I use the regen pedals to brake and only use foot brake for full stops. When I'm driving I reduce the regen to none and just coast. I get 260+ km at 100% charge and 10.5kWh/100km average over the 8000 km I've driven.

I drive about 110kph on the highway (I'm in Ontario Canada). From what I can see drafting makes some difference but not enough to warrant doing it due to the dangers. The wind speed and air density far outweighs anything else. The same stretch of highway with same traffic conditions (I have extremely regular commute route) can differ between > 12 kWh/100km and < 9 kWh/100km.

We'll see how that changes now that it's winter.
 

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Regen is only useful when converting your kinetic (moving) energy into stored electrical energy. The byproduct of this is to slow the car's speed. So regen is USELESS going uphill (unless you needed to stop quickly... and in that case, you should use the brake pedal).

Going faster (rather than slower) uphill can help if the hill is short enough, but on extended elevation climbs, slower with constant-speed will use the least amount of energy. Last night I drove up an extended incline that rose 4000 feet over 15 miles. I drove at a constant 50 MPH the entire way.

If you are traversing rolling hills then Driving-With-Load will help a lot. This is a hypermiling technique in which you use your momentum to climb a small hill (as much as possible) and then coast down the other side and then apply a short boost of energy near the bottom to help climb the next hill, etc.

Driving-With-Load is just one way to get at the idea of coasting as much as you can. I find this is the real secret. To be clear, this is with Regen set to ZERO. The Ioniq Electric is the best coasting car I've ever seen. If you see a traffic signal 1/2 mile to 3/4 mile in front of you and you notice that it's been green for a long time, anticipate that it will turn red soon and start coasting. You can likely coast the entire way. You may even still be coasting once it finishes the red cycle and turns green again. If so, that's a win. You have conserved some kinetic energy to assist with rebuilding your speed. However, if you find that you will actually be stopped by the red light, then aggressively apply Level 3 regen from the paddle for as long as you can. This is a judgment call. You'll get some right and some wrong, but with practice, you'll get most right. In this way, you conserve some energy by transforming it to stored electrical. And while this is good, conserving kinetic energy is better. When you are fully stopped, it requires a huge amount of energy (proportionately) to get moving again. Try to avoid complete stops ;)

When you do accelerate try to do so smoothly and with THREE green bars (or less) on the leftmost gauge. In some situations, this won't be possible for safety or etiquette reasons, but the more you can do this the better your energy usage will be.

The biggest thing is to drive far ahead in your mind. Look a mile down the road and see what is coming. Anticipate. The more coasting you can do the better. Turn off that Regen (keep it at zero) until you decide you need it temporarily to convert as much kinetic energy into stored electrical energy as you can while stopping. Then turn Regen off again. Driving around with Level 3 Regen (one-pedal driving) is by far not the best way. The one exception for this is if you are in a traffic jam on the freeway where you only get to pull ahead a few feet and then stop and wait over and over. One-pedal driving with Level 3 Regen will save your sanity here and will help maximize energy recovery.

In summary:
  • Try to conserve kinetic energy as much as possible but as soon as a stop becomes inevitable, try to convert as much kinetic energy as possible to stored electrical energy thru maximum regen. This takes practice to get it right. If you overdo the Regen and find yourself stopping early, you'll need to apply the *throttle* a little just to get to the actual stopping point and that is wasteful.
  • Try to accelerate smoothly and with a maximum of three green Eco-range bars. And try to avoid full stops whenever you can.

***
Consider this...

All of the energy that you use from the traction battery ultimately gets converted into thermal energy. This is basic thermodynamics and is known as the process of Entropy. All concentrated sources of energy eventually transform into diffuse heat in the environment. When driving any vehicle, most of the used energy goes toward moving air molecules out of the way, which heats them up slightly. The next biggest factor (for a car) is the friction between the tires and the roadway, which heats the molecules of both. Both of these friction vectors (pushing air and rubbing tires against pavement) also produce sound, which is another way to heat the air.

In a normal vehicle, the use of brakes wastes an enormous amount of energy by converting all of the kinetic energy thru friction into concentrated heat in the brake pads and rotors (or drums) which then *uselessly* radiates into the atmosphere. Regenerative braking instead *brakes* the car using the electric motor temporarily as an electric generator to transform the motion of the car into stored electrical energy for the traction battery.

So the game we are playing when attempting to *Extend EV Range* is to try to delay the conversion of stored electrical energy into diffuse environmental heat as long as possible WHILE at the same time traveling as far as possible. If you think about it in those terms, it becomes clear that coasting as much as possible is key.
 

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I fully agree. One minor addition: the effect of using the regen level 3 can equally well be obtained by using the brake pedal. It is just a matter of which instrument you prefer to achieve the same effect.
 

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I fully agree. One minor addition: the effect of using the regen level 3 can equally well be obtained by using the brake pedal. It is just a matter of which instrument you prefer to achieve the same effect.
I agree. But one minor point here. When using the brake pedal, at some uncontrollable point the car will decide to use the brake-pads in addition to the Regen. Not necessarily a bad thing, but any brake-pad usage is wasted energy. And eventually, the pads will need to be replaced. To be sure, both of these issues are minor. But another little game I am playing is to see if I can go the full three years of my subscription without the need to change the brake pads...
 

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The hypermiling technique called Driving-with-Load may help a bit, especially when going up and down repeatedly. This is like heavy traffic does: going uphill you let the car decrease speed and going downhill you let the car increase speed. With the increasing speed when going down you easily go uphill for the next climb. Mountainbikers also know to apply this very well.
Sure; in perfect world where everybody is calm and enjoy ride and rushing as they are 30min late.
Going uphill and slowdown - you get rear-ended by $500 worth pick up truck
Going downhill and accelerating - you get nailed by cops waiting for you.
 

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Driving-With-Load is just one way to get at the idea of coasting as much as you can. I find this is the real secret. To be clear, this is with Regen set to ZERO. The Ioniq Electric is the best coasting car I've ever seen. If you see a traffic signal 1/2 mile to 3/4 mile in front of you and you notice that it's been green for a long time, anticipate that it will turn red soon and start coasting. You can likely coast the entire way. You may even still be coasting once it finishes the red cycle and turns green again. If so, that's a win. You have conserved some kinetic energy to assist with rebuilding your speed. However, if you find that you will actually be stopped by the red light, then aggressively apply Level 3 regen from the paddle for as long as you can. This is a judgment call. You'll get some right and some wrong, but with practice, you'll get most right. In this way, you conserve some energy by transforming it to stored electrical. And while this is good, conserving kinetic energy is better. When you are fully stopped, it requires a huge amount of energy (proportionately) to get moving again. Try to avoid complete stops ;)
Again, this is all nice if you are ALONE on the road at around 03:00...
I do coast all the time with my non-battery powered, stick car and what I see 10 out of 10 times? Idiots jumping into space in front of me; morons accelerating! even it is red ahead; bullies honking like it is end of world or Godzilla is after them.
 

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I agree. But one minor point here. When using the brake pedal, at some uncontrollable point the car will decide to use the brake-pads in addition to the Regen. Not necessarily a bad thing, but any brake-pad usage is wasted energy. And eventually, the pads will need to be replaced. To be sure, both of these issues are minor. But another little game I am playing is to see if I can go the full three years of my subscription without the need to change the brake pads...
Yes, you can see that from the 6 blue bars. If you are close to filling all of them you are close to mechanical braking. Can regen 3 use 6 of them?
 

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The hypermiling technique called Driving-with-Load may help a bit, especially when going up and down repeatedly. This is like heavy traffic does: going uphill you let the car decrease speed and going downhill you let the car increase speed. With the increasing speed when going down you easily go uphill for the next climb. Mountainbikers also know to apply this very well.
Sure; in perfect world where everybody is calm and enjoy ride and rushing as they are 30min late.
Going uphill and slowdown - you get rear-ended by $500 worth pick up truck
Going downhill and accelerating - you get nailed by cops waiting for you.
Best is when you drive behind a heavy truck.
 

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... But another little game I am playing is to see if I can go the full three years of my subscription without the need to change the brake pads...
I would expect you should be able to easily do that. My Prius had 136,000 miles before I had to replace the front pads. The rear pads still look like new. The Prius uses regen until down to 8 MPH or when you stomp hard on the brakes. Brake pads last a long time. I hope they would on an EV also unless Hyundai has messed up and under-utilizes regen.
 

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I would expect you should be able to easily do that. My Prius had 136,000 miles before I had to replace the front pads. The rear pads still look like new. The Prius uses regen until down to 8 MPH or when you stomp hard on the brakes. Brake pads last a long time. I hope they would on an EV also unless Hyundai has messed up and under-utilizes regen.
I had a Prius as well. Loved the car, but had to replace the front brake pads three times in the first 80,000 miles. To be fair we live up a mountain with a winding road.
 

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Best is when you drive behind a heavy truck.
Even better if you can tie your car to big track...
Not very smart as you have to be VERY alert as they know (big trucks) to brake for no reason (like oh, I just woke up, and I am still on the road, I better slow down from 130 to 60).
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I had a Prius plug-in before and it's true about the pads. I had about 80k on my car after three years and the dealer still told me I had tons of life left in the pads. Hopefully the Ioniq is conservative as well with when the brake pads are actually applied.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Back to the range. I've been trying my 35 mile, twice daily, commute and coasting as much as possible did not save me much. I filled up fully before leaving and I have basically the same no matter what regen level I use. It seems to me that if the regen is on that when at partial throttle and going flat or a slight downhill I can maintain 1 bar of charging for miles. So if I coasted that distance instead of slightly pressing on the throttle I wouldn't be adding charge. There has to be a trade off point with the car, where coasting or adding charge trades off. It may not be a physics question, it may be an engineering question. This might come down to how the car was programmed and what it actually does in regen mode, beyond the obvious. If I am pressing on the accelerator on a flat road and getting 1 bar of charging, is this net charging. Meaning I am giving it 2kw but the regen is giving me 3kw in return so a net of 1kw ( just random numbers, not an estimate...). But coasting will only give you distance and not extra charge. There has to be a reason why my daily commute is the same no matter what regen level I drive on. Thoughts?
 

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Back to the range. I've been trying my 35 mile, twice daily, commute and coasting as much as possible did not save me much. I filled up fully before leaving and I have basically the same no matter what regen level I use. It seems to me that if the regen is on that when at partial throttle and going flat or a slight downhill I can maintain 1 bar of charging for miles. So if I coasted that distance instead of slightly pressing on the throttle I wouldn't be adding charge. There has to be a trade off point with the car, where coasting or adding charge trades off. It may not be a physics question, it may be an engineering question. This might come down to how the car was programmed and what it actually does in regen mode, beyond the obvious. If I am pressing on the accelerator on a flat road and getting 1 bar of charging, is this net charging. Meaning I am giving it 2kw but the regen is giving me 3kw in return so a net of 1kw ( just random numbers, not an estimate...). But coasting will only give you distance and not extra charge. There has to be a reason why my daily commute is the same no matter what regen level I drive on. Thoughts?
Probably physics. At the end of the day you are moving weight `A` distance `B` at a nett velocity/acceleration `C`. Although regen is a factor, so is wind, so is weather, so is traffic and a myriad of other small copmpnents.
I don't think small changes are going to make a big difference unless you start going to the extremes of the envelope - drag increases as a square of the speed so double the speed means four times as much drag.

But below about 40 mph drag can almost be regarded as a constant. :nerd:

Basically, what I'd suggest is that if you can't make major changes by alteration of the driving habits, then the car and electronics are probably pretty well optimised already.

Just drive it, keep it clean, keep added weight to a minimum and acceleration to a modest level and you are doing the best you can.
 
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