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So the car does about 37 miles in EV then you use one gallon and get 65 UK miles we will say. That would be 102 miles for the first gallon but the second gallon will only be 65 mpg. So how do you get 100+MPG and even quote 250+MPG.

I'm confused how this is worked out.
 

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If you drive about 40 miles per trip and charge between each. The reported MPG is for the mixed driving, which may consist of more than 90% EV driving for some. For me it's about 50% - 60% EV.

Some of us purchased the PHEV over the BEV because our trips are often much longer, eben longer than the range of a BEV, and get moderate, but very good overall MPG.
Some could not get the BEV, have very few long trips, just 35 miles day or such, charge every night and use almost no petrol. The MPG term/unit becomes a bit funny then, even for combined.
 
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Sounds like they think the electricity is free. However, it make sense because it is “MPG” not MPG + M/kWh.

I’m very confused why people buy a plugin or ev when they’re in a very high electricity cost region. I think because of the “MPGe” is misleading.

For example, I’m in Connecticut,U.S., and, in my opinion, plugging and ev should not exist here. Our electricity cost is at 23 cents/kWh. For an ev that is about 3.5miles/kWh it will cost 6.5 cents/miles.

My ioniq hybrid drives 58MPG and now the gas price is about $2.90/gallon. That is 5.0 cents/miles. Let alone that the gas price just gone up recently. I’ve seen the lowest of $1.9/gallon last year and on average the gas price that I filled my Ioniq HEV is $2.5/gallon.
 
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The guys at work always asks me about my car. When I tell them how many mpg I am getting they always ask how much higher my electric bill is now. I don't really know because my wife pays the bills each month. But i know I'm saving money because whatever my electric bill is, it's less than what I would have spent on gas.

Then whenever I plug in at work they grumble that I'm getting free electricity and they are not getting free gas. They think when I plug in that I'm getting $50 worth of free electricity because that's what they pay at the gas station. They don't understand that I'm getting about $1 worth of electricity.

(I pay about 13 cents/kWh and gas here is about $2.90 per gal US)
 

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Sounds like they think the electricity is free. However, it make sense because it is “MPG” not MPG + M/kWh.

I’m very confused why people buy a plugin or ev when they’re in a very high electricity cost region. I think because of the “MPGe” is misleading.

For example, I’m in Connecticut,U.S., and, in my opinion, plugging and ev should not exist here. Our electricity cost is at 23 cents/kWh. For an ev that is about 3.5miles/kWh it will cost 6.5 cents/miles.

My ioniq hybrid drives 58MPG and now the gas price is about $2.90/gallon. That is 5.0 cents/miles. Let alone that the gas price just gone up recently. I’ve seen the lowest of $1.9/gallon last year and on average the gas price that I filled my Ioniq HEV is $2.5/gallon.

Well, that's at least one advantage that we have in Ontario lol. The electricity price from 7pm-7am and all weekend and holidays in 6.5c/KWh. That's about 5c/KWh USD. So it costs very little to "fill up" my PHEV with electricity. I believe that Quebec is even cheaper. The gas prices are another story though.
 

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Well, that's at least one advantage that we have in Ontario lol. The electricity price from 7pm-7am and all weekend and holidays in 6.5c/KWh. That's about 5c/KWh USD. So it costs very little to "fill up" my PHEV with electricity. I believe that Quebec is even cheaper. The gas prices are another story though.
Wow!!!! I wish I live there. And I guess all of your home heating is electric then.
 

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Wow!!!! I wish I live there. And I guess all of your home heating is electric then.
Our electric is 5.5 cents/kWh here in Seattle. The BEV and PHEV vehicles make a lot more sense when just looking at mileage for that cost.
 

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For example, I’m in Connecticut,U.S., and, in my opinion, plugging and ev should not exist here. Our electricity cost is at 23 cents/kWh. For an ev that is about 3.5miles/kWh it will cost 6.5 cents/miles.

3.5 miles/Kwh is very low.....you must be referring to Tesla or volt. My Ioniq, and most other owners on this forum except extreme winters, averages between 5 and 6 miles/Kwh so say 5.5 average. From your figures this works out at 4c/mile + lower servicing costs, no oil changes etc.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I’m very confused why people buy a plugin or ev when they’re in a very high electricity cost region. I think because of the “MPGe” is misleading.
I saw a program about car electricity here in UK saying how high it is, one of the reasons I didn't buy a plug-in that and the fact there are very few charge points and I live in Central London. There are a couple at the local supermarket that I rarely use but people just park their cars in them like they are normal parking spots. I see this at other supermarkets that have charge points too, no one enforces the electric parking bays.
 

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3.5 miles/Kwh is very low.....you must be referring to Tesla or volt. My Ioniq, and most other owners on this forum except extreme winters, averages between 5 and 6 miles/Kwh so say 5.5 average. From your figures this works out at 4c/mile + lower servicing costs, no oil changes etc.;)
Interesting, I’ve got the 3.5miles/kWh from Chevy Bolt forum (the only reasonable ev I can buy here in Connecticut). Based on what you said the ioniq ev is much better and it make sense to get one.
 

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I don't think there is a right answer for calculating the MPG of the plug-in.

In an extreme example recently I did 250 miles and did not use any petrol.

In my signature I quote an inclusive cost, since I know the cost of my electricity I use that to buy pretend petrol at a fixed price (otherwise if the fuel price went up I would appear to buy less). It is the best I can think of but if anyone has a better idea I would be interested to find out.
 
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I saw a program about car electricity here in UK saying how high it is, one of the reasons I didn't buy a plug-in that and the fact there are very few charge points and I live in Central London. There are a couple at the local supermarket that I rarely use but people just park their cars in them like they are normal parking spots. I see this at other supermarkets that have charge points too, no one enforces the electric parking bays.
PHEV's can be penalised by a standing charge &/or hourly rate (because the input takes longer). Some of this is deliberate to stop PHEV's using a BEV space. On the other hand some charging point are free.

However if you are to charge at home or work it is a different story.
 

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In my signature I quote an inclusive cost, since I know the cost of my electricity I use that to buy pretend petrol at a fixed price (otherwise if the fuel price went up I would appear to buy less). It is the best I can think of but if anyone has a better idea I would be interested to find out.
I use about 7.5 kWh from 16% to 100% at the cost of 0.95 NOK/kWh = NOK 7.1, and can drive 50 km at 60 km/h for that.
For petrol, I use 4.0 L/100km at 60 km/h, equals 2 litres for 50 km, at NOK 16.0 per liter = NOK 32.
Each time I charge up completely I save NOK 24.9.
If I charge as much as 250 - 300 times a year for 5 - 6 years, and drive at least 25 000 km/year, it covers the initial extra cost for a plug-in over hybrid. Not bad, not good either, in terms of pure economy for ownership.

Fuel economy alone was not the reason for selecting plug-in, but
1. Silent driving as from interior
2. No emissions, on short trips, of
+ Noise from engine
+ toxic pollution gases
+ climate gas CO2
3. The possible extra torque without revving the engine so much, EV like characteristics
4. The technology itself, the seamless integration, still thrilled by it, fun to drive and make the most of

Plus, more interested in "investing" in tech, at point of purchase, for lower running costs, than vice versa. And I have had a history on plug-in tech, discussing and promoting it, 11 year ago. My points are proven, as many, who are not ready for full BEV, chose a plug-in, these days.

Given the very effective hybrid version, and the BEV version, we PHEV owners should not brag about cost savings or overall economy, compared to other variants of Ioniq. It's minor, or negative, compared to a BEV. And, if you (almost) only drive in EV mode, a BEV would have been a better choice.

But Ioniq (all variants) is/are the one(s) of the most environmentally friendly, and economy friendly, car(s) of it's kind(s). To waste of anything, effective and not oversized for common use as people transporter. Very well designed.

Proud of my Ioniq, even love it. That can't be measured in money.
 

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So the car does about 37 miles in EV then you use one gallon and get 65 UK miles we will say. That would be 102 miles for the first gallon but the second gallon will only be 65 mpg. So how do you get 100+MPG and even quote 250+MPG.

I'm confused how this is worked out.
Several reasons:
1: The PHEV does not use all its electricity in the first 37 miles. Consider it more like: `37 miles spread over the course of the journey`. This lowers the perceived MPG as it only registers fuel consumed `Miles Per Gallon`. Of course, one CAN make it use the juice in the first 37 miles and thus see a completely unrealistic MPG figure as it will only barely use any petrol. Hence 250+ mpg...

2: The car also has a regen facility so it can replenish electricity on the move, albeit at a low rate. Combine this with automated `electric mode` and if you're going downhill or coasting, for example, you can be doing 40 mph at no fuel cost as the engine is off.

3: The MPGe figure is about as accurate as any government statistic. Owners (and Fuelly) will give you a more realistic figure in mixed use of 85 mpg. If your car gets 65 mpg you must be talking about a Hybrid

4: The default setting on the fuel monitoring gauge is per tankful, not cumulative. So type and duration of journey makes a massive difference. Switch it to cumulative since least re-set and you iron out many of those differences.


I have had BOTH a HEV and a PHEV and after 22,500 miles in the former and 2,500 miles in the latter that's what I get and what I report.

Finally, if you have access to a charge point that has no cost (at work or via expenses on the road) then for the purposes of argument there is no cost to `electric miles`. So while the MPG reads one thing, the actual `cost per mile` is an order of magnitude lower. :nerd:
 

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Here is a spreadsheet of my fuel and energy use since new on my PHEV
I drive in E mode most of the time
It is in Open office calc format :- https://www.openoffice.org/download/index.html

I use two chargers the ICCB charger, and the pod point charger. Depends whether there is enough sun to charge from solar panels.
 

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