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I just bought the car and while driving during winter (around -4 to 2 degrees Celsius) I noticed that the car never gets its water temperature to 90 degrees even after driving a lot.
I had a diesel car before this hybrid and even this car would’ve reached 90 degrees after 20-25 minutes of having the engine running.

Also, after it reaches around 50 it already starts to disengage the engine and use the hybrid system.

Is this normal?


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First of all, how do you know it never reach 90C?

My experience is if I drive on highway the temp gauge went to one slot below half, as usual in the summer, in about 10/15 minutes. However, if I drive on local road it would take quite a while to reach that level.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, if it reaches the middle, that should mean 90 degrees, like in any car, at least in Europe.
Mine also stays one line below the middle.



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My gauge reaches half way ( normal ) after about 10 minutes ( guessing ) but it mostly alternates between EV and ICE so it's difficult to put an exact figure on it . Takes no longer to warm up than my previous diesel car . One thing you will notice is that the temperature cools down pretty quickly when in EV mode when cold . What part of the UK are you situated ? I'm guessing up North because ambient temperatures you mention are not typical of the temperatures in my location ( this winter at least ) .
Have you got the Hybrid or PHEV ?
 

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If you have a Plug in Hybrid and are running in electric mode, then in cold weather the engine will only run at fast tickover until the heater has warmed the inside of the car, then it will turn off until more heat is needed. It may not reach "normal" operating temperatures.

If you run in Hybrid mode it will reach "normal" temperature.

In the summer the engine may not run at all.
 

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i just drive around in sport mode when i first get in the car when its cold out until the engine warms up. obviously worse MPG but warms faster
 

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its been about 40F here in the PNW USA. it takes my ioniq a few minutes to warm up to one notch under the middle. drive a little aggresive and the ICE will kick on longer and more often . this speed up warm up. if one drives like a little old lady it might take a lot longer to heat up. one thing i did notice is the ICE cools down really quick after turn off
 

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i just drive around in sport mode when i first get in the car when its cold out until the engine warms up. obviously worse MPG but warms faster
Perhaps it's negligable, but I was under the impression that forcing performance like that before it warms up (to warm it up) would lead to increased and premature wear and possibly breakage if it's cold enough outside. I know with cars today, you don't need to warm them up by idling, but one should still be gentle with driving until it is warmed up on a cold day and avoid aggressive driving.
 

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The Atkinson cycle of the Kappa engine means it takes longer to warm up, due to thermal efficiency. Really glad I have heated seats and steering wheel.
 

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The Atkinson cycle of the Kappa engine means it takes longer to warm up, due to thermal efficiency.
That should be insignificant. Lets say the engine (when warmed up) has the stated 40% efficiency and a non-Atkinson engine 30%. Do you think that additional 10% waste heat will make a difference? Only a very small amount of waste heat is needed to heat the cabin, the rest goes into radiated heat from the engine block and radiator.

Back to the real world, this car has cabin heat far faster than my last non-hybrid car. Probably due to the coolant loop behind the catalytic converter, but that appears to overwhelm any theoretical advantage of a non-Atikinson engine in providing cabin heat briskly.
 

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Perhaps it's negligable, but I was under the impression that forcing performance like that before it warms up (to warm it up) would lead to increased and premature wear and possibly breakage if it's cold enough outside. I know with cars today, you don't need to warm them up by idling, but one should still be gentle with driving until it is warmed up on a cold day and avoid aggressive driving.
i didnt say be flooring it and driving fast. its just that the car is more likely to stay with the engine on when in sports mode, for example stopped at red lights. the rpms still stay around 2000 though
 

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i didnt say be flooring it and driving fast. its just that the car is more likely to stay with the engine on when in sports mode, for example stopped at red lights. the rpms still stay around 2000 though
Perhaps it's negligable, but I was under the impression that forcing performance like that before it warms up (to warm it up) would lead to increased and premature wear and possibly breakage if it's cold enough outside. I know with cars today, you don't need to warm them up by idling, but one should still be gentle with driving until it is warmed up on a cold day and avoid aggressive driving.
I'm inclined to agree with @Ioniq1 & @Phasetaylor on this one, with some qualifications.

From personal experience in my Plug In Hybrid when driving in Sport, I can manually shift around the 1,500 RPM mark to the next gear. It's the 1st gear to 2nd shift from a dead stop that can run away on you if you're not paying attention, after that just keep shifting and watch the tach to see where you're at until you adjust to early shifting. I'm more "old school" and usually use the console shifter rather than the paddles, but the choice is yours.

This will allow me to gently bring the engine coolant temperature up to 1 notch/bar below middle of the temp guage and then I switch back to EV and let the ICE be controlled by the car to maintain my pre-set cabin temp. Obviously a lower setting is better than higher, but it is not necessary drive in a cold cabin IMO.

Certainly, rather than idling to warm up, using Sport judiciously the first 5-7 minutes of my drive will bring the engine up to a more efficient operating temperature than HEV mode and should also help to reduce potential engine condensation as well, a win/win in my books.

This technique works well for me in my PHEV in my more moderate climate, and I'd be interested to hear from those in colder regions to compare their results.

Try it, you just might just like it.
 

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I'm inclined to agree with @Ioniq1 & @Phasetaylor on this one, with some qualifications.

From personal experience in my Plug In Hybrid when driving in Sport, I can manually shift around the 1,500 RPM mark to the next gear. It's the 1st gear to 2nd shift from a dead stop that can run away on you if you're not paying attention, after that just keep shifting and watch the tach to see where you're at until you adjust to early shifting. I'm more "old school" and usually use the console shifter rather than the paddles, but the choice is yours.

This will allow me to gently bring the engine coolant temperature up to 1 notch/bar below middle of the temp guage and then I switch back to EV and let the ICE be controlled by the car to maintain my pre-set cabin temp. Obviously a lower setting is better than higher, but it is not necessary drive in a cold cabin IMO.

Certainly, rather than idling to warm up, using Sport judiciously the first 5-7 minutes of my drive will bring the engine up to a more efficient operating temperature than HEV mode and should also help to reduce potential engine condensation as well, a win/win in my books.

This technique works well for me in my PHEV in my more moderate climate, and I'd be interested to hear from those in colder regions to compare their results.

Try it, you just might just like it.
All fair enough. I don't have a tachometer on my car at all, so I have no way of knowing where my RPMs are at all, except by listening to the engine.
 
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I'm inclined to agree with @Ioniq1 & @Phasetaylor on this one, with some qualifications.

From personal experience in my Plug In Hybrid when driving in Sport, I can manually shift around the 1,500 RPM mark to the next gear. It's the 1st gear to 2nd shift from a dead stop that can run away on you if you're not paying attention, after that just keep shifting and watch the tach to see where you're at until you adjust to early shifting. I'm more "old school" and usually use the console shifter rather than the paddles, but the choice is yours.

This will allow me to gently bring the engine coolant temperature up to 1 notch/bar below middle of the temp guage and then I switch back to EV and let the ICE be controlled by the car to maintain my pre-set cabin temp. Obviously a lower setting is better than higher, but it is not necessary drive in a cold cabin IMO.

Certainly, rather than idling to warm up, using Sport judiciously the first 5-7 minutes of my drive will bring the engine up to a more efficient operating temperature than HEV mode and should also help to reduce potential engine condensation as well, a win/win in my books.

This technique works well for me in my PHEV in my more moderate climate, and I'd be interested to hear from those in colder regions to compare their results.

Try it, you just might just like it.
All fair enough. I don't have a tachometer on my car at all, so I have no way of knowing where my RPMs are at all, except by listening to the engine.
 
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Plus when driving gently in sport mode, the engine super charges the battery while also warming up, so once you have your warm air and engine and you take it off sport mode, you have an almost full battery the cruise around in silentev mode
 

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The engine turns on if I dial up the heat, so I don't think sport mode is necessary.
 

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Plus when driving gently in sport mode, the engine super charges the battery while also warming up, so once you have your warm air and engine and you take it off sport mode, you have an almost full battery the cruise around in silentev mode
I agree @Phasetaylor (y) however and with all due respect, how about phrasing that more accurately as "you have a more topped-up battery than using HEV mode to cruise around in silentev mode"? ?

Actually I just did an experiment this morning and it took me about 4 kilometers (2.48 US miles) of stop and go city driving in manual Sport mode on mixed flat & moderate hills during approx. 9 minutes time to warm up to "normal" Engine Temp.

From there I switch to EV and let the car automatically cycle with HEV & ICE to maintain the Auto/ADS OFF 22* (71.6 F) cabin setting in 4*C (39.2* F) outside temperature. BTW my cabin is feeling nicely warm by now.

Best I could tell while driving solo today was that 1,200 RPM is the minimum to keep me in manual Sport mode, any lower RPM then EV mode cuts in and also a minimum 1500-1700 RPM for the manual Sport mode to accept my manual up-shift to a higher gear.

I'll have to test on the highway and steeper/more up-hills at some point too, but IMO both would result in even faster Engine warm-up times. :unsure:

Hope this helps some and I continue to invite further input from colder climates and both HEV/PHEV owners.

PS No photos, never really happened, right? ;)

PPS Usually I am 90% Economical and Eco Level 8 except when I get penalized for selecting Sport mode, no matter how conservatively I drive.
 

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Actually I just did an experiment this morning and it took me about 4 kilometers (2.48 US miles) of stop and go city driving in manual Sport mode on mixed flat & moderate hills during approx. 9 minutes time to warm up to "normal" Engine Temp.
I'd be interested to know if the same drive another morning in EV mode results in the same warmup time. Your warmup time is longer than my HEV based on when the coolant water display hits its normal position. However, I'm going a bit further and mostly highway speeds.
 

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I'd be interested to know if the same drive another morning in EV mode results in the same warmup time. Your warmup time is longer than my HEV based on when the coolant water display hits its normal position. However, I'm going a bit further and mostly highway speeds.
Hmmmm.... yes, [email protected], that's a good point. I will try soon and report back, I'm interested as well. (y)
 
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