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I am installing solar at home and this was a big reason I wanted an Ioniq 5. I didn't want to spend $15-20k on a battery on my wall when I could get one on 4 wheels.

We very rarely have blackouts where I live in Southern California but they could occur more frequently.

We have net metering so I could charge the battery when rates are low and sell back when they are high. I haven't looked into the economics of this but I am charged 3x from 4pm-9pm.

Anyone have experience with this? Would special software upgrades be needed?
 

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I think you are looking for a bidirectional charging setup. I have only read about test or prototypes for this. I hope to be able to do this with my Ioniq 5 but there is no guarantee that the car will support it. And there is nothing available on the market today that does it.

In the meantime I got the V2L adapter and plan on using it to power “critical loads” (refrigerator, Internet and a few lights) if/when the power fails.
 

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And there is nothing available on the market today that does it.
I am hoping you are wrong about this? What about the generator port of hybrid inverters like the Sol Ark? I was told by Sol Ark tech people the inverter MAY even support 120V input. If it doesn't the inverter would just throw an 'unbalanced load' fault.

In the meantime I got the V2L adapter and plan on using it to power “critical loads” (refrigerator, Internet and a few lights) if/when the power fails.
Do you know if there is a problem leaving an Ioniq 5 turned on for say overnight? One way or the other, a better bet, assuming you have a hybrid inverter like the Sol Ark, might be just to use it to charge a small bank of AGM (lead acid) batteries that would provide a buffer of a few hours' power.

There is a protocol EVs use to tell the charger when to stop additional charging. That's the reason to try 120V transfers first. But if that doesn't work, how about a split phase step up inverter?
 

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I think you are looking for a bidirectional charging setup. I have only read about test or prototypes for this. I hope to be able to do this with my Ioniq 5 but there is no guarantee that the car will support it. And there is nothing available on the market today that does it.

In the meantime I got the V2L adapter and plan on using it to power “critical loads” (refrigerator, Internet and a few lights) if/when the power fails.
Back when I wrote that I was unaware of any home EVSE that supported V2H or V2G. But the post by @steven made me do another search. It looks like there might now be some equipment available. I found a web page that lists a V2H/V2G device built by Delta. From the description, it looks like it could fit the bill. But when I went to the Delta website for North America I did not see that device listed. So maybe it is really new. Maybe it is in development. Or maybe it is for some other market than North America.

I don’t know much about Delta other than apparently EvGo uses them for their commercial charging stations. If they can build Level 2 and DCFC charging equipment that can stand the abuse of being in shopping center parking lots then they may be able to make a good quality home unit. I was unable to find a site that listed a price for the above V2H/V2G device.

Are they still an EVSE if they use a CSS connector and work on the DC bypassing the car’s built-in charger?

Edit: Missed it, the spec sheet says the car side connector is CHAdeMO. So I guess I still haven’t found a CSS compatible V2H/V2G box that is available on the market.
 

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Back when I wrote that I was unaware of any home EVSE that supported V2H or V2G. But the post by @steven made me do another search. It looks like there might now be some equipment available. I found a web page that lists a V2H/V2G device built by Delta. From the description, it looks like it could fit the bill. But when I went to the Delta website for North America I did not see that device listed. So maybe it is really new. Maybe it is in development. Or maybe it is for some other market than North America.

So I guess I still haven’t found a CSS compatible V2H/V2G box that is available on the market.
Because it takes more than just the EVSE. If you look at the Ford Lightening, ford partnered with SunRun who were already using the SolarEdge BI-N Backup Interface with their bigger battery deployments and adapted it with the EVSE ford includes to handle back-feeding the home via the trucks DC pins on V2H.

Given that they (SunRun) don't like to modify existing systems I'd be surprised if they offer this to consumers without a solar setup but would NOT be surprised if it worked with the IONIQ5 after an update from Hyundai to allow it to do V2H.

So someone else would need to come up with a full panel Backup Interface and EVSE using Ford's example (first to market here in the us)

Gas Electronic device Machine Electrical wiring Electrical supply


That's the BIN there which SunRun is including with their current whole home installations.

Automotive parking light Tire Wheel Property Vehicle


Which I'm guessing we'll see a similar version of tailored to the ford here.

Just noticed they have the 16 kWh battery in the photo (also LG RESU):

Communication Device Gadget Rectangle Electronic device Portable communications device

So that's likely an updated BIN to match next to the EVSE
 

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The V2L still has some good value. I live in SW Florida and we're preparing for a possible hurricane next week. I've been through several and generally deal with a weeks plus of power outages after the fact. Tested the V2L today on motorhome and it will run everything in the camper minus the a/c which is a 15000 btu. I also tested it on an 8000 btu window unit and it ran well. It's nice to have a power unit that you can run at night without the normal racket of a generator.
 

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I am installing solar at home and this was a big reason I wanted an Ioniq 5. I didn't want to spend $15-20k on a battery on my wall when I could get one on 4 wheels.

We very rarely have blackouts where I live in Southern California but they could occur more frequently.

We have net metering so I could charge the battery when rates are low and sell back when they are high. I haven't looked into the economics of this but I am charged 3x from 4pm-9pm.

Anyone have experience with this? Would special software upgrades be needed?
If I was you I would strongly suggest being prepared to tell your solar inverter to not put power onto the grid. I'm not saying don't put power onto the grid -- I'm saying make sure you get an inverter that will let you change your mind in the future and choose not to put power onto the grid.

Putting power onto the grid makes you technically a "power generator" with a bunch of regulations that come with it. Some people decide it's not worth it -- but then feel trapped because they had opted for cheaper inverter(s) that didn't have the "no output" option (sometimes it's called "zero report"). One of those regulations is that you have to set your inverter to automatically power down if the grid power goes down (to keep from electrocuting linemen working on downed lines). Another is some states (and I hear California is moving to this) are getting rid of net metering and are charging large monthly fees for people who help supply power to the grid. I knew this ahead of time going into solar (because Alabama was already not doing net metering before I went solar) so I paid a little extra for a large inverter that prevents me from putting power onto the grid. With the inverter capacity I have now I'd have to pay $130 flat monthly fee (on top of the $15.60 flat fees and taxes us Alabama electricity consumers already pay), just for them to force me to not have power the few times the grid goes down here, and pay me about 1/5th the rate for power that they charge their customers.

So research the micro details and make sure putting power onto the grid is worth it. If it is, fine go for it, but be ready to disable it later. Don't let the power buyback money be what you depend on in your math to make the cost of going solar worth it.

Jaw Sleeve Eyewear Font Beard
 

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For what it's worth about installing solar, my power bill was generated last night and is a reminder that going solar is worth it, at least in my case.

After riders and fees and taxes, they're charging 14.4¢ / kWh (U.S. dollars) -- a 6% increase over the rate last September a year ago. It makes me glad I had to pull only 17% of my power from the grid (I'm hoping that will average 10% throughout the year now that the solar upgrade was completed this past month). I'm all for solar if you live in the southern half of the U.S. (or similar climate) and you manage it instead of bureaucrats managing it and regulating it at the utility level.
 

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If I was you I would strongly suggest being prepared to tell your solar inverter to not put power onto the grid. I'm not saying don't put power onto the grid -- I'm saying make sure you get an inverter that will let you change your mind in the future and choose not to put power onto the grid.

Putting power onto the grid makes you technically a "power generator" with a bunch of regulations that come with it. Some people decide it's not worth it -- but then feel trapped because they had opted for cheaper inverter(s) that didn't have the "no output" option (sometimes it's called "zero report"). One of those regulations is that you have to set your inverter to automatically power down if the grid power goes down (to keep from electrocuting linemen working on downed lines). Another is some states (and I hear California is moving to this) are getting rid of net metering and are charging large monthly fees for people who help supply power to the grid. I knew this ahead of time going into solar (because Alabama was already not doing net metering before I went solar) so I paid a little extra for a large inverter that prevents me from putting power onto the grid. With the inverter capacity I have now I'd have to pay $130 flat monthly fee (on top of the $15.60 flat fees and taxes us Alabama electricity consumers already pay), just for them to force me to not have power the few times the grid goes down here, and pay me about 1/5th the rate for power that they charge their customers.

So research the micro details and make sure putting power onto the grid is worth it. If it is, fine go for it, but be ready to disable it later. Don't let the power buyback money be what you depend on in your math to make the cost of going solar worth it.

View attachment 45627
As stated, everyone will make their own decisions based on their goals.

That being said, if you ARE looking NOT to contribute to a more resilient grid, here's a great article on the specific types of setups that will let you cloister your energy.
 
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