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https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1115091_dealers-start-to-worry-about-ebbing-repair-income-from-electric-cars

The average vehicle on U.S. roads these days is more than 10 years old, despite three successive years of record new-vehicle sales.
That's a result not only of the 2008-2010 recession but also vastly more durable and reliable vehicles compared to those of previous decades.
All of those vehicles provide a ready stream of service revenue to dealerships, especially while they're still in warranty.

Data from dealer trade groups shows that servicing is one of the two most-profitable lines of business for franchised dealerships, along with sales of used cars.
New-car sales are actually less profitable, but they do create a steady flow of customers who will come in for service in the future.
Electric cars, however, are poised to throw a monkey wrench into the gears of that finely tuned business model.As a recent article in the "Fixed Ops" section of industry trade journal Automotive News (subscription may be required) notes, the reduced service requirements of battery-electric cars will generate far less revenue for dealerships.
Experts say everything in the back of the store—vehicle repair, parts, body shops, service customer retention—will be disrupted if the coming armada of electric vehicles, which require less maintenance than traditional cars and trucks, sells in high volume.
While plug-in electric cars, both battery-electric and plug-in hybrid, now account for only about 1 percent of new-vehicle sales, that percentage will clearly increase in the future.
Wally Burchfield, Nissan North America's vice president of U.S. aftersales, estimated a battery-electric vehicle would generate only two-thirds to three-quarters the service revenue from regular maintenance items that a gasoline car would.
We suggest that may be a bit optimistic.
Tires and wiper blades are the sole wear items on a Nissan Leaf electric car, though replacing the filter in the cabin air-intake system is also recommended.
Sure, toward the end of their lives, electric cars may also need suspension work, alignment, and brakes—but as with hybrid-electric vehicles, their friction brakes last far longer than other cars due to the use of regenerative braking to slow the car while recharging the battery.
Reports of Nissan Leafs and Toyota Priuses still on their original brake pads at 75,000 miles are not uncommon.
A UBS teardown of a Chevy Bolt EV and a gasoline-engined Volkswagen Golf concluded that replacement parts for the Bolt EV (with 24 moving parts) would be 60 percent lower than for the VW Golf (with 124 moving parts).Sure, toward the end of their lives, electric cars may also need suspension work, alignment, and brakes—but as with hybrid-electric vehicles, their friction brakes last far longer than other cars due to the use of regenerative braking to slow the car while recharging the battery.
Reports of Nissan Leafs and Toyota Priuses still on their original brake pads at 75,000 miles are not uncommon.
A UBS teardown of a Chevy Bolt EV and a gasoline-engined Volkswagen Golf concluded that replacement parts for the Bolt EV (with 24 moving parts) would be 60 percent lower than for the VW Golf (with 124 moving parts).
I am beginning to wonder if we are beginning to see the start of dealers adjusting to this with the 3750 mile oil change "requirement" due to "harsh operating conditions"
 

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Well, and the owner's manual mention of using standard oil. I'm thinking a synthetic oil should allow same intervals as a Prius. I live in Arizona and have no plans on using 3750 mile interval at any point of ownership. I will probably go 4500 miles on first change, and around 6000 or slightly more after that using a synthetic blend.
 

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I'm sure their solution will be increased service costs, brake pads that wear faster, and increased use of specialized tools that make self-service difficult or impossible.
 

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Ive talked some to local garages, that does not sell new/used cars..
Trying to talk about EV's with them is imposible...

And the biggest reason for that is ofc, tha in the end, they will not have a job, their hole life, education, hobbies, income is from fossil-burning veicles...
EV's that dont need servicing is a frightening prospect.
The thought of renewing themselvs into becoming sertified for EV-servicing across brands is just not pressent at all.

Instead its all about spreading false information and preventing ppl from buying EV's, even Hybrid even tho they need more servicing...
So ive givven up talking with them. :p
They've become a tire-changing place for me, guess thats what they want to be/do in 15years.
 

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My local garage guy is very open to EV cars. Before buying my EV I was talking with him about this and he told me; It's true the the motor is different but it still connected to the wheel, you still have steering, suspension, brakes, air filters and wipers.

Guess it is a glass half full kind of way to look at it ;)
 

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...but it still connected to the wheel, you still have steering, suspension, brakes, air filters and wipers....
This is exactly it. Unless we are to infer that the latest generations of engines have been far less reliable than those that have gone before, the idea that there's no way to make money from servicing EVs is just plain silly.

Overall, vehicle reliability has improved markedly over the years, and yet dealerships and back-street shops have still made money from maintenance and repair work. There is plenty of plain old mechanical engineering on any car to ensure there's work to go around for those that are any good at it.

I suspect the whining comes from dealership service departments and back-street shops that aren't any good at it, and just need to blame anything but themselves for a slow-down in work to deal with.
 

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Modern ICE is very durable and low maintenance too. Honda 4 cylinder engines will run 500,000 miles without needing an overhaul. Besides routine oil changes there are many mechanical and electrical components that can go wrong. These components may not even have anything to do with the engine. Modern cars have electronic conveniences that often go bad and need service. A great majority of dealer services are electronic components, suspension, tire, body and damage repairs. Quick lube oil changes will have the most to lose if all cars become electric because their service is very limited. But for now, the infrastructure for electric charging stations won't support a cross country trek or any rural U.S. cities. In my neck of the woods, the only charging stations are car dealerships.
 

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Even now garages are finding less and less to do. It does not help them that oil changes moved to 18k miles, the engines run forever, tyres last for 60k miles (in the USA at least), plugs last for 30k miles and the bodywork doesn't rust.
All they have to look forward to is pothole damage to suspension and tyres. That is what killed my 12 year old diesel Renault apart from its scheduled design flaws and the need for me to have a bit of new technology.

You can't even suggest they are always going to have accident damage to fix because the cars are now trying to avoid accidents.
 

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8 million cars are scrapped each year in Europe and 5 millions in the United States alone. 6 millions cars in the US are involved in an accident (large and small) that need repairs.
Car repair shops are very busy in my area I don't think they're going out of business soon.
 

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https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1115091_dealers-start-to-worry-about-ebbing-repair-income-from-electric-cars


I am beginning to wonder if we are beginning to see the start of dealers adjusting to this with the 3750 mile oil change "requirement" due to "harsh operating conditions"
A victim of their own gouging?

Note how many UK dealers have such things as cafe's and coffee machines - all designed to make good on the gouging, a quid at a time.

Given the new reality of all the complex electronic repairs that have superceded hitting-things-with-hammers I hardly see UK dealers suffering from hardship!

How long before they charge for normal upgrades, I wonder?
 
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