Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having not had an automatic before for my own car although have used when in the USA as hire car.

When the car is in "P" is that like leaving your manual car in gear ?

My drive is quite a big slope and I tend to leave my car in gear as precaution that my handbrake fails.

With the Ioniq being an auto box if I apply the handbrake using the foot pedal is putting it in "P" the equivalent of what I am doing with my manual box.

I just worried what happens if handbrake fails although it's never happened whilst any of my cars have been on the drive. Maybe me just being too unreal.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,252 Posts
when in park the gearbox is in effect locked, so yes it is like leaving a manual in gear, but better


you have to put it in park to start the car, so you soon learn to put I park when you park up and shutdown the car so it is ready to start next time you get in


you should also use the parking brake to prevent strain on the gearbox which could cause damage to it, again you soon get used to it


just don't do what I did to my wifes manual car, I hadn't driven a manual for a few weeks got in hers, started it, then went to put it in drive !!!, stuck it in 2nd at a stand still with no clutch and her sat next to me :-O


I still get reminded now every time I use her car I need to use the clutch :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks bluecar1 I thought that was the case and just wanted to check.

I would always put the proper handbrake on on my drive although it's a foot brake on the Ioniq although I prefer that as I am a little heavy handed with handbrakes. Well I was before my current car which is electronic one.

I presume if you put in reverse as I you take foot off brake it will start edging back up the drive rather than rolling down. Don't know if the hill start assist works in reverse or only going forwards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
So, is it all right to put into 'P' in the Ioniq when sitting in traffic or waiting at the traffic lights?

I did it all the time in my Prius, but then again the 'P' was a button next to the steering wheel...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
I think the proper way is park when stopped in traffic as then you won't roll. In the real world in my golf I keep it in drive unless the q is moving really slowly and then I slip it in to N to stop my foot aching.

Just don't sit on a hill in d for a long time holding the car on creep like that as you might damage the clutch plates in the gearbox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
OK, thanks.

It's just that I don't like having my foot on the brake and illuminating the car and the driver's face behind me. In addition, I need to find out if the ICE charges the battery in Neutral, as I know this does not happen in the Prius (intentionally).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,252 Posts
there is a difference with how the DCT works in the Ioniq, as there is an additional clutch between the electric motor and the ICE, and the electric motor is used to get the car moving so no initial clutch sip


from what I can work out when you are sat in "D" drive at a stand still first gear is selected and clutch is released and a small amount of power is provided to the electric motor, (this is why as soon as you release the brake you then creep forward), once you start to move if required the ICE starts and the clutch between the ICE and electric motor is released so the ICE can either provide additional power or take over from the electric motor


sat in "N" neutral both clutches are disengaged along with the one between the electric motor and the ICE so no movement on the input shafts of the DCT and no power applied to the Electric Motor


in this way Hyundai have minimised the wear on the dry clutches in the DCT and removed the common judder caused by the clutch slip used to get the car moving that many people seem to dislike, so from my understanding putting it in neutral should cause no wear (as the clutches are not slipping), save a small amount of battery power as the motor is not powered at all and case no problems
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Having not had an automatic before for my own car although have used when in the USA as hire car.

When the car is in "P" is that like leaving your manual car in gear ?

My drive is quite a big slope and I tend to leave my car in gear as precaution that my handbrake fails.

With the Ioniq being an auto box if I apply the handbrake using the foot pedal is putting it in "P" the equivalent of what I am doing with my manual box.

I just worried what happens if handbrake fails although it's never happened whilst any of my cars have been on the drive. Maybe me just being too unreal.
This is a good question and I think what happens is that the clutch that connects the ICE to the eMotor and transmission engages, and first gear engages, so that engine compression can hold the car. If this is the case, then it shouldn't be possible to have the ICE run or charge the traction battery while the car is stopped and in park. Ioniq owners? If the ICE can run and charge the battery with park engaged, then parking pawls must be used to hold the car stopped in park; similar to a torque converter auto.

...I presume if you put in reverse as I you take foot off brake it will start edging back up the drive rather than rolling down. Don't know if the hill start assist works in reverse or only going forwards.
This is another good question because I don't think the Ioniq would have a reverse gear. It's simpler and cheaper to reverse the electric motor and just use first gear. Hill start assist is always done with the electric motor in any case.

I think the proper way is park when stopped in traffic as then you won't roll. In the real world in my golf I keep it in drive unless the q is moving really slowly and then I slip it in to N to stop my foot aching.

Just don't sit on a hill in d for a long time holding the car on creep like that as you might damage the clutch plates in the gearbox.
Letting the Ioniq creep doesn't hurt the clutch plates at all. The electric motor handles "creep" duty with very little strain.

Here is a link to a video about do's and don't s with a dry DCT like the one of the Ioniq. I previously posted it in the "Foot operated parking brake" thread, but it belongs here.

https://www.motorsport.com/automotiv...vehicle-65347/
None of those cautions applies to the Ioniq because the electric motor always gets the car underway. It's effectively the torque converter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
I've commented before on some thread here about Americans' inability to drive, in general, and specifically about the vast majority of U.S. drivers being unable to use manual transmissions. In a lot of ways I envy the car culture of Europe, where a driver's skill at using a manual transmission is taken for granted (or at least it was on my many trips to Europe in years past--that may be changing today).

And I'm mildly bemused by posters here who say "I've never driven an automatic" and ask for tips on how to do it.

Not to put too fine of a point on it, but here's the tragic story of what happened in Houston, Texas, when some young punks tried to steal a car that they couldn't drive because it had a manual gearbox:

Police: Dad shot dead because car had stick shift - SFGate
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,356 Posts
I've mostly driven manual all my life .When I did drive automatic I really didn't like them . With the DCT in the Ioniq though ,I'm converted . Maybe it's because of my advancing years I've become lazy and prefer a more leisurely approach . Maybe my days of being a wannabe Formula 1 driver are long gone...... as are the speeding tickets ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
Letting the Ioniq creep doesn't hurt the clutch plates at all. The electric motor handles "creep" duty with very little strain.



None of those cautions applies to the Ioniq because the electric motor always gets the car underway. It's effectively the torque converter.
I understand that this caution doesn't apply on a Toyota or Lexus hybrid where there is no clutch between the motor and the traction wheels. But Hyundai and Kia hybrids do have a clutch between the motor and the traction wheels.

The Ioniq owner's manual extensively explains this caution DOES apply, p. 5-17 and 5-18

• To hold the vehicle on a hill use the foot brake or the parking brake. If the vehicle is held by applying the accelerator pedal on a hill the clutch and transmission will be overheated resulting in damage. At this time, a warning message
"Steep grade! Press brake pedal" will appear on the LCD display and you may feel a vibration.
NOTICE
Driving your vehicle
• If the clutch becomes overheated by excessive use of the clutch to hold on a hill, you may notice a shudder feeling and a blinking display on the instrument cluster. When this occurs, the clutch is disabled until the clutch cools to normal temperatures.
If this occurs, pull over to a safe location, shift into P (Park) and apply the foot brake for a few minutes.
• If the LCD warning is active, the foot brake must be applied.
• Ignoring the warnings can lead to damage to the transmission.
• If the display continues to blink, for your safety, we recommend that you contact an authorized HYUNDAI dealer and have the system checked.
• Under certain conditions, such as repeated stop-and-go launches on steep grades, the transmission clutches may overheat. When the clutches are overheated, the transmission safe protection mode logic is enabled.
If the safe protection mode logic is enabled, the gear position indicator on the cluster blinks with a chime sound. At this time, a warning message "Transmission temp. is high! Stop safely" or "Transmission overheated! Stop for – min." will appear on the LCD display and driving may not be smooth.
If you ignore this warning, the driving condition may become worse. To return the normal driving condition, stop the vehicle and apply the foot brake for a few minutes before driving off.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,252 Posts
Under normal circumstances the ICE is not involved in getting the car moving, but I think on very steep slopes then the ICE may need to help

Those warning are about very specific circumstances, the one thing I have noted is no warning about using neutral causing wear, but also nothing to say use neutral when stopped at lights etc

It's a real guess and see what works best for you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
I understand that this caution doesn't apply on a Toyota or Lexus hybrid where there is no clutch between the motor and the traction wheels. But Hyundai and Kia hybrids do have a clutch between the motor and the traction wheels.

The Ioniq owner's manual extensively explains this caution DOES apply, p. 5-17 and 5-18
Yes, I noticed that in the manual also. It's cut and pasted from one of the non-hybrid DCTs that Hyundai sells and it's inaccurate for the hybrid. The electric motor always gets the car underway. The ICE can join in the effort as soon as the wheel rpm is high enough (5mph?) that the engine can be started and coupled to the output. That would be a full-throttle, maximum power start. In low-power starts (creep duty), the engine may not start and supply power till the battery starts running down. This sonata hybrid animation explains operation in more detail. The Ioniq uses the same P2-style hybrid drive with a DCT in place of the conventional automatic:

 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top