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2022 Ioniq 5 SEL AWD Digital Teal
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I just did 3000 miles from northern California to Raleigh north Carolina in my SEL AWD. Did it with my 2 older boys starting Thursday and ending Monday. I used ABRP to plan out each days drive and then tweaked to meet my desires.

The only issues I had charging and driving was not knowing what was coming up and needing to pee more than I needed to charge. Most stops were at EA (only one charge point in rifle to be safe) and the lowest I ever hit was 29% before the rifle stop. I kept to the speed limit or higher depending on how far to the next stop, I would go faster if it was around 100 miles between. I did hit green river as well on Friday and no issues personally.

We would plot the final destination and the next 2 chargers on the built in nav and checked plugshare and the EA app ahead of time to plan for issues.

I will say that when it gets hot outside I normally grab the 150 charger as it doesn't ramp the battery temp to max (using a reader to check stats) and it normally keeps a good charging rate where the 350 will push too much power and heat in a short time and then fault after a few minutes.
 

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2022 Ioniq 5 Cyber Grey Limited
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Even if the EA station in Green River was totally out, there are two ChargePoint DC fast chargers in Price UT that should be easy to reach if you fully charge in Grand Junction CO. Not as fast as EA but still very doable. I'd recommend opening a ChargePoint account and getting one of their RFD cards ahead of time. There are lots of ChargePoint DCFC in CO and UT.

The warm summer temperatures should provide the best range possible. Keeping your speed below 70 mph can definitely help, at least until you're confident of reaching your next charging station. The posted speed limits are the maximum not minimum and traffic is not that heavy on I-70 in UT.
I really don't think you'll have a problem.
Thanks for the tip on Price that does look like a nice alternative. I already have an account set up but have never used them. Today Green River EA reports show it back up.:)
 

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2022 Ioniq 5 Cyber Grey Limited
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I just did 3000 miles from northern California to Raleigh north Carolina in my SEL AWD. Did it with my 2 older boys starting Thursday and ending Monday. I used ABRP to plan out each days drive and then tweaked to meet my desires.

The only issues I had charging and driving was not knowing what was coming up and needing to pee more than I needed to charge. Most stops were at EA (only one charge point in rifle to be safe) and the lowest I ever hit was 29% before the rifle stop. I kept to the speed limit or higher depending on how far to the next stop, I would go faster if it was around 100 miles between. I did hit green river as well on Friday and no issues personally.

We would plot the final destination and the next 2 chargers on the built in nav and checked plugshare and the EA app ahead of time to plan for issues.

I will say that when it gets hot outside I normally grab the 150 charger as it doesn't ramp the battery temp to max (using a reader to check stats) and it normally keeps a good charging rate where the 350 will push too much power and heat in a short time and then fault after a few minutes.
Thanks, this is why this forum is so great. You get to learn from everyone's experiences. More great tips. I agree the 150 charger makes sense on the really hot summer days.
 

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I've taken three long road trips with my HI5L. Tulsa to Denver (purchased EV in Tulsa, OK). Denver to Zion, UT and back. Denver to LA and back. I've run my battery down to 0% and once missed an exit so that by the time I turned around at the next HWY exit, I didn't have enough range based on the car's computer to make it back to the EA charger in Cedar City, UT. I did make it to that charger and had 1% battery remaining. On highways, I generally drive 5-10mph over the speed limit.
Several things I have learned on these road trips:
1. The most efficient use of charging time is to use up most of your battery (ie drain down to 10% or lower) before charging. The fastest charging speeds are from 0 to 70% with sl decrease in speed from 70-80%. Charging speed slows dramatically above 80%. This is well demonstrated by Out of Spec Motoring.
2. A strong headwind kills HWY driving efficiency.
3. APRP is a great app.
4. Efficiency usually improved when driving over mountain passes. Regen is substantial coming down a pass.
5. You can always beat the car's calculated range estimate by driving so that your blue efficiency bar is to the right of the dark bar that shows average efficiency.
6. Frustrating finding EV's using the 350kW chargers that don't benefit or substantially benefit from using them when there are 150kW chargers available.
7. Using HDA2 makes long road trips a breeze.
 

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I'm planning to travel from Lancaster Pa. to Missoula Montana the first week of August and then driving back again, 2752 miles one way.
Traveling on I-70 cutting up to I-15 at Green River then I-90 due to wanting to use EA chargers the whole way. Taking 3 and a half days.
My concern is having a charger breakdown and being stuck at that location not being able to make it to the next charger. Checking daily on Plugshare reporting I find I should be okay the whole way. However, today they are reporting the chargers at Green River not working, only one working cutting out every two minutes. I could probably get by with this.
If I skip that charger along the way it leaves me with 230 miles to next charger in Spanish Fork. I would need to charge to 100% at the stop prior to GreenRiver to make it comfortably. The longest planned distance to charge at several other stops is 214-217 miles based 3.8 kw/mile.

Is it a mistake to try to make it through the western states at this time of year or any other time for that matter?

I have 5000 miles on the car since Feb. and have had no problems whatsoever. I do trust the car at this point as long as I can get charging. I've only used EA chargers one time doing all my charging at home at level 1.
HAVE A PLAN B incase you cant find an e/a charger. The question is are you prepared to pay to use a charger or several if so go for it if its going to rune your trip then don't bother. You are over estimating your mileage highway driving in august when it could be 95 degrees out good luck. At 90 % charge figure 200 miles tops.
 

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I'm heading to Missoula from South Jersey (Philly suburb) on Friday and am making it difficult on myself by going through the Badlands east to west across South Dakota and then east to west across Montana. But i have never seen that part of the country so off we go.
So I am in Wall SD at the moment, spent the last few days enjoying Badlands National Park. Definitely a place to see on a trip out to this part of the country.
The trip from Jersey to Chicago was uneventful, EA all the way with no issues. Had a hiccup in Chicago because Plan A was to use the Tesla Destination charger at the hotel to charge up overnight but could not get it to work with my new TeslaTap (traded up from the 40 amp to the 80 amp before this trip but failed to test it before I left). Plan B was an EA station nearby so no worries there, but was concerned about the next stop, Souix Falls, because the fastest EVSE there are 50 kW and are mostly at car dealerships and my plan was to use the Destination Charger at my hotel there. However, David from TeslaTap saved the day by troubleshooting with me over the phone during my drive to Souix Falls, and when I arrived there and had time to fiddle around with the TeslaTap, it finally engaged into the charge port properly and works like a charm. Kudos to David for his knowledge and persistence.

The trip from Sioux Falls to Wall SD was a bit of a nail-biter, though having ABRP with an OBD dongle really saved my nails from being decimated. It was listed at 291 miles with no Level 3's or Level 2's along the direct route. ABRP looking at my live data told me I could make it if I went 55 the whole way on a road where the speed limit is 80. Not ideal but doable. To add to the fun, at least 3 times construction put us down to one lane (once for 17 miles) so you can imagine the centipede of cars and trucks behind me. I continually monitored ABRP to see how I was doing and at times even bumped the speed up to 62 until I saw the numbers trending the wrong way and went back to 55. This is where things stood after I backed into the EA stall at Wall Drugs:
Cloud Land vehicle Sky Tire Plant


So all in all it is going well so far. This was my first experience with an OBD dongle and ABRP and I have to say, I'm impressed. I knew we were not going to run out even though it would be close, and that made it an absolutely worthwhile investment.

The car is running great and performing as expected. So nice to have the extra space and superfast charging speed as compared to my Kona....

More to come.
 

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I realize I will have to stay under the speed limit between a few of the stops. I plan to stay at 70 most of the way and hope I don't get rear ended. A few of the stops are only 100 to 150 miles apart so I should be able to run the higher speed limits then. Should be an adventure.

Thanks for all the tips from everyone.
Some things that might help if you are going to go below the speed --Obviously use the right lane you are on a multi lane road. If you go 10mph below the speed limit, you should turn your blinkers on. The second, if you are on a one lane road and there are lots of cars behind you is to pull over from time to time and let the 80 mph crowd blow by. Im suggesting these two things because Ive had to do that on the mountain highways about 20 minutes from where I live. Its gotten normal for 75-85 mph out there when the posted speed is 70, and they can get aggressive if you are in their way. Best of Luck, and would love to hear your trip report when you get back!!
 

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this is an awesome story. Can you share how you got the Tesla tap to work? There are threads that say to turn the car on and off and or remote start. I have had some issues with my lectron adapter and can’t pinpoint what I should do so I try every option until it works.
Awesome seeing 300+ Miles on a charge with 3% remaining! Hope the trip is still fun!
 

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this is an awesome story. Can you share how you got the Tesla tap to work? There are threads that say to turn the car on and off and or remote start. I have had some issues with my lectron adapter and can’t pinpoint what I should do so I try every option until it works.
Awesome seeing 300+ Miles on a charge with 3% remaining! Hope the trip is still fun!
The trip is definitely still fun and I expect more fun as i make my way to Missoula from Wall. As for the TeslaTap, this was not the usual issue I have read about with Lectron adapters. My 40 amp TeslaTap worked fine and all i ever did was plug the Tesla side into the adapter, wait 30 seconds for the handshake, and then plug it into the car, just like directions say. It worked so well that when I upgraded to the 80 amp I didn't bother to test it out before leaving, which in retrospect was a mistake.

This problem was a mechanical issue. When I would plug it into the port on the car it would not go in all the way and I was afraid if I really forced it too hard I might damage the vehicle. I described what was going on to David, and he explained to me how the mechanical connections are supposed to work and he told me to use needle nose pliers on a particular pin to rotate it slightly to change its alignment slightly (apparently these connectors gave very small tolerance and even a slight misalignment can prevent it from engagement). I did that and it still was not engaging sufficiently to connect. So I messed with the pin some more and also used the pliers to very slightly ream out the plastic around the female side of the pin, and between those two things I was able to get it to engage and I heard the magical "charging started" announcement. Now it works fine. Probably just an issue with the fabrication process but not fatal, and I'm so glad I have this adapter and David to support it when needed (though I don't think I'll need help with it anymore).
 

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The trip is definitely still fun and I expect more fun as i make my way to Missoula from Wall. As for the TeslaTap, this was not the usual issue I have read about with Lectron adapters. My 40 amp TeslaTap worked fine and all i ever did was plug the Tesla side into the adapter, wait 30 seconds for the handshake, and then plug it into the car, just like directions say. It worked so well that when I upgraded to the 80 amp I didn't bother to test it out before leaving, which in retrospect was a mistake.

This problem was a mechanical issue. When I would plug it into the port on the car it would not go in all the way and I was afraid if I really forced it too hard I might damage the vehicle. I described what was going on to David, and he explained to me how the mechanical connections are supposed to work and he told me to use needle nose pliers on a particular pin to rotate it slightly to change its alignment slightly (apparently these connectors gave very small tolerance and even a slight misalignment can prevent it from engagement). I did that and it still was not engaging sufficiently to connect. So I messed with the pin some more and also used the pliers to very slightly ream out the plastic around the female side of the pin, and between those two things I was able to get it to engage and I heard the magical "charging started" announcement. Now it works fine. Probably just an issue with the fabrication process but not fatal, and I'm so glad I have this adapter and David to support it when needed (though I don't think I'll need help with it anymore).
Awesome that it’s working. I wonder if 80amp is going to be the future of level 2 charging. I am still using my 32a ChargePoint that I got for my 2019 ioniq and is working out on the I5. I did have fun getting 9.5kW on a Tesla destination charger.

I really enjoy the “charging started” sound…for now.

side note and extremely off topic - podcast I was listening to was talking about Montana - episode is Planet Money 1554 best by, sell by, use by and they mention Milk being thrown out in 12 days at grocery stores. Random but interesting.
 

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...
The trip from Sioux Falls to Wall SD was a bit of a nail-biter, though having ABRP with an OBD dongle really saved my nails from being decimated. It was listed at 291 miles with no Level 3's or Level 2's along the direct route. ABRP looking at my live data told me I could make it if I went 55 the whole way on a road where the speed limit is 80. Not ideal but doable.
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Wow, this is an epic tale! Thank you for sharing. I really appreciate it.

I just had to fire up ABRP and play around with its options. It's telling me that using a reference consumption of 3.5 miles per kWh at 65 mph, I could get from Sioux Falls to Wall at 50 mph in an AWD I5.

The big takeaway for me is the value of having a good OBD dongle, and yours seems to have saved your bacon.

Reading your May/June posts it appears that you have the OBDlink CX, iPhone running ABRP and RWD I5?
 

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Reading your May/June posts it appears that you have the OBDlink CX, iPhone running ABRP and RWD I5?
All correct - and I used ABRP with "Automatic Settings" toggled on so that it was using live SoC, calibrated reference consumption, live weather and traffic, etc. I like Google Maps better as a Navigator, so I used that for navigation but switched to ABRP every so often to see how I was doing with regard to my consumption and how much charge it was predicting I would have upon arrival, and used that as a guide for whether I could speed up a little. Really valuable tool to have on a trip like this.

I should add that it was a little dicey going 55 with 18 wheelers flying by me at 80+, but I stuck with the program and it worked. That was actually more anxiety-provoking than the charge level....
 

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So I am in Wall SD at the moment, spent the last few days enjoying Badlands National Park. Definitely a place to see on a trip out to this part of the country.
The trip from Jersey to Chicago was uneventful, EA all the way with no issues. Had a hiccup in Chicago because Plan A was to use the Tesla Destination charger at the hotel to charge up overnight but could not get it to work with my new TeslaTap (traded up from the 40 amp to the 80 amp before this trip but failed to test it before I left). Plan B was an EA station nearby so no worries there, but was concerned about the next stop, Souix Falls, because the fastest EVSE there are 50 kW and are mostly at car dealerships and my plan was to use the Destination Charger at my hotel there. However, David from TeslaTap saved the day by troubleshooting with me over the phone during my drive to Souix Falls, and when I arrived there and had time to fiddle around with the TeslaTap, it finally engaged into the charge port properly and works like a charm. Kudos to David for his knowledge and persistence.

The trip from Sioux Falls to Wall SD was a bit of a nail-biter, though having ABRP with an OBD dongle really saved my nails from being decimated. It was listed at 291 miles with no Level 3's or Level 2's along the direct route. ABRP looking at my live data told me I could make it if I went 55 the whole way on a road where the speed limit is 80. Not ideal but doable. To add to the fun, at least 3 times construction put us down to one lane (once for 17 miles) so you can imagine the centipede of cars and trucks behind me. I continually monitored ABRP to see how I was doing and at times even bumped the speed up to 62 until I saw the numbers trending the wrong way and went back to 55. This is where things stood after I backed into the EA stall at Wall Drugs:
View attachment 44415

So all in all it is going well so far. This was my first experience with an OBD dongle and ABRP and I have to say, I'm impressed. I knew we were not going to run out even though it would be close, and that made it an absolutely worthwhile investment.

The car is running great and performing as expected. So nice to have the extra space and superfast charging speed as compared to my Kona....

More to come.
Sir you are the Captain James T Kirk of the USS Ioniq 5 a real Ferdinand Magellan or Amerigo Vespucci I applaud you
 

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Don't forget snacks. In gas car trips, we would have plenty of snacks. Just drove 2500 round trip, Florida/Michigan, cruise set to 75mph, 2.6 miles/kwh, same as Rich5 post. We only needed enough snacks to last to the next charger, mostly Walmart. When possible I would charge up to enough to get me to, two chargers away, in case the next charger was a problem.
 

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I just finished a 1200 mile road trip from SF Bay Area to Portland and back. On the way up, ABRP predicted an average efficiency of 2.5 mi/kwh at 110% of the reference speed (65 mph). I actually did better than that, about 2.8 mi/kwh at about 75 mph.

I would use the EA app since it pretty accurately shows which chargers are unavailable. If it shows 2 or more out (usually 4 per station), than I'd go to a high SOC at the previous station so that you have the option to skip the problem station.
 

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Recently completed a 3.5K miles trip from Miami to Detroit and back in AWD SEL. EA stations worked beautifully... until they didn't on the way back. At 2 stations half of the chargers were broken or disconnected randomly. The other half were in use by slow charging cars, so I had to wait until the owners came back from shopping or restaurants. Charging under pouring rain was not fun either. When dealing with that kind of electric power, wet connectors could really ruin your day. We drove 2 days each way with overnight stops half way in Atlanta. 700 miles with 4 stops per day. Majority of driving was at 75mph with battery usage a hair under 3.0 mi/kW. HDA made driving so much easier. I was absolutely impressed. In addition, cruising with HDA only used rear motor, which turned AWD into RWD. Fine with me on the dry highway.

I did not use ABRP and did not bother connecting the dongle, even though I had one. All I needed to know was % left and how far the next couple of EA chargers were. Before leaving on a trip, I built an Excel spreadsheet with all the needed data, calculated distances using GM, important comments from plugshare, etc. All I had to do was to decide where to stop next and fire up Waze accordingly. Screenshot is below. Based on the X in the "Stop" column it recalculated %/distance from that point on with color coding if I was going over 80%, etc. Basically a lot of time was spent, but I enjoyed building it, so no time wasted. My reasoning is that I need to be able to do trip planning myself and have all information at the fingertips in the convenient format. If something unexpected happens and you run out of range, blaming ABRP will not help.

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I made a fiscally irresponsible decision not to disconnect and reconnect the plug at 29 minutes. It cost me a whopping $15 for electricity mostly while using per minute chargers. Below 80% SOC I5 normally pulled 170kWh and 220 kWh while using 150 kW and 350kW chargers respectively. EA Android app sucks. I remember standing in front of the charger almost at midnight with 8% SOC remaining, with a bunch of kids in the car and bad cell phone reception trying to start the charging. I don't wish anyone that experience.
 
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