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Ioniq 38kwh 2020
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Thanks for your input, but again, I'm not comparing it to a sports car.
I'm comparing it to a 14 year old Mondeo family wagon and it didn't even hold a candle to it in what I would call normal driving.
Mondeos were always quite renowned for their keen handling.
In the Ioniq, I do find putting it in regen 3 through the twisty stuff does seem to improve things, the increased engine braking effect does make the handling feel keener. Similar to going through bends in 2nd/3rd gear as you would on a spirited drive.
 
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Yes, I'm thinking the "free wheeling" through the bend probably didn't help compared to having at least the engine on the wheels in the Mondeo.

For what it's worth, I'm not letting the handling prevent me from buying it. If it's still an issue in six months, I'll look at swapping it.
 

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UK spec 2020 1st Edition in Polar White
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You used the phrase that it couldn’t handle corners you can throw the Mondeo around with ease. That is entirely my point, since it’s launch, the Mondeo has had a reputation for being one of the best handling ‘normal’ cars in its class, as does the Focus and Fiesta. They are legacies of Richard Parry-Jones, the now retired chassis genius.

Generally, Mondeos don’t ride on Eco tyres and their suspension, certainly compared to the rigid torsion system on the rear of the Ioniq BEV, is far more sophisticated.

If you want something that’s better (or at least as good as) your Mondeo, buy another Mondeo. If you can accept the compromises driving an Ioniq BEV requires, especially the complete change in your approach to the art of driving, buy one.
 

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Red 2019 Ioniq 38 Premium EV
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I have to say the ID.3 feels very well planted indeed. Thanks to the rear wheel drive, and the far better weight distribution, plus a lot more torque/power in the motor, & multilink rear suspension, you can chuck that round corners remarkably well. Give it some throttle on a bend and there's none of that nose-drifting-wide at all, instead it's really neutral &keeps its line beautifully. But it's no sports car - my son's Mazda MX3 would blow it away round the twisties! But he did really like the almost-endless surge of power when he accelerated it quickly up the motorway! Chp off the old block, but he'll learn... :)

But why would you want to be chucking any of these EVs round corners, unless you have money & energy to waste? A great part of EV driving is about coming to the realisation that resources should be used carefully, as excessive demands place demands in turn on other aspects of life & the environment on this planet. Hoofing a car round the corners simply wastes energy as more scrubbing takes place, wears your tyres out faster, and generates more tyre particulates than really necessary.

Maybe it's part of getting older, and ?possibly? wiser, but I now find great delight in using as little energy & tyres as possible, that way I'm giving the chancellor even less of my money as VAT. etc. Zero VED p.a. is just part of thet delight! While it lasts...
 

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Red 2019 Ioniq 38 Premium EV
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I thought the Ioniq 28 had a worse distribution than that? Was thinking front 40/ rear 60 ish? The 38 has more battery up-front, so is better, no?

edit: after some googling:
2018 Hyundai Ioniq Electric Review – Video - HybridCars.com
says the 28 kWh has 50-50 weight distribution. I could have sworn it was lighter at the front end, leading to some loss-of-grip in winter time!
 

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2019 Ioniq 28kWh
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I could have sworn it was lighter at the front end, leading to some loss-of-grip in winter time!
I have yet to adress the poor traction. I could unscrew the front sway bar links and se if it changes. Probably I dont want to run it that soft in the front but I think it's a ratio between rear and front. making front softer is easier for testing.

Maybe the multilink of the phev fits in the rear.

time will tell I guess
 

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I have to say the ID.3 feels very well planted indeed. Thanks to the rear wheel drive, and the far better weight distribution, plus a lot more torque/power in the motor, & multilink rear suspension, you can chuck that round corners remarkably well. Give it some throttle on a bend and there's none of that nose-drifting-wide at all, instead it's really neutral &keeps its line beautifully. But it's no sports car - my son's Mazda MX3 would blow it away round the twisties! But he did really like the almost-endless surge of power when he accelerated it quickly up the motorway! Chp off the old block, but he'll learn... :)

But why would you want to be chucking any of these EVs round corners, unless you have money & energy to waste? A great part of EV driving is about coming to the realisation that resources should be used carefully, as excessive demands place demands in turn on other aspects of life & the environment on this planet. Hoofing a car round the corners simply wastes energy as more scrubbing takes place, wears your tyres out faster, and generates more tyre particulates than really necessary.

Maybe it's part of getting older, and ?possibly? wiser, but I now find great delight in using as little energy & tyres as possible, that way I'm giving the chancellor even less of my money as VAT. etc. Zero VED p.a. is just part of thet delight! While it lasts...
I think you nail it here. The Ioniq is an extremely comfortable and pleasant drive. It's got enough straight-line zip when you need it. There are plenty of things it's not suited for, but it's peerless for efficiency and sensible driving.
 
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