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whereas the 'km indicated' is what is known at forehand as the general WLTP-indication from the car producer; I added the label WLTP now.
"Claimed range (km)" works better for native English language readers. Only your follow-up post got me there.
 

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"Claimed range (km)" works better for native English language readers. Only your follow-up post got me there.
Getting all engineer, I'd probably say "nominal range", but Jan is the guy who brings us all the numbers (for the statistically inclined among us), no need to nitpick :p
 

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And your fuel cost is set by your electric company, not any car manufacturers.
Both actually. Just as a high mpg ICE costs less to run no matter the fuel price. One thing that set the 28 Ioniq EV apart from competitors is how far it would go on a kWh (think miles per gallon or your preferred units). I think it beat Tesla or came close. Distance per dollar upfront cost was a clear winner over Tesla. Range anxiety is why we see EVs with big batteries, especially EVs with worse efficiency. And the bigger the battery, the worse the efficiency as the extra weight forces a full time penalty over lighter EVs.
 

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We really have to interpret these numbers in context. The configuration tested was not the most efficient (The RWD config would probably be a few percent more efficient at least, I don't think we know for certain), and the Ioniq 5 cannot reasonably be compared directly to the OG Ioniq and Kona. The Ioniq 5 is significantly bigger than both (because of either type class, size class, or a combination). Smaller cars are almost always more efficient on average than larger ones, sedans are almost always more efficient on average than SUV/Hatch/Crossover types.

So the best comparison is against it's direct competitors, specifically the ID.4, Mustang Mach-E, and Model Y. Model Y is not on the list, so I'll use numbers I've found online (which are not direct comparisons. Per edmunds the model Y seems to reserve around 5% of it's range after indicated 0, so I'll consider that for comparison purposes:
Ioniq 5 AWD (19" wheels): 14.4 kwh/100km
ID.4 First Edition (Which is RWD only): 14.5 kwh/100km
Mustang Mach-E AWD: 16 kwh/100km
Tesla Model Y Long Range: ~16.8 according to Inside EVs (other sources say 17ish) - 10% = 15.12 kwh/100km

By these numbers, the Ioniq 5 is competitive with if not better than it's most immediate competitors (That Model Y number seems a bit high to me, but tesla's range numbers are also well known to be misleading so idk). The AWD Ioniq 5 is more efficient than the RWD ID.4, which is pretty impressive (also considering it's a much more powerful vehicle).

In other words, the Ioniq 5 is impressively efficient for its segment and price range (The part time AWD system probably has a lot to do with that. Also smaller wheels are known to be more efficient than larger ones on average). Power consumption on the order of 10kwh/100km is unrealistic by the standards of the segment at this time. This will no doubt improve over time (the adoption of solid state batteries, whenever that happens, will almost certainly be revolutionary). It's also worth noting that the I5 achieves it's efficiency with an unimpressive drag coefficient (0.288 vs the Model Y's claimed 0.23) indicating that it's efficiency is principally due to good engineering rather than aerodynamic effects.

In other words: The numbers are actually pretty impressive.
Well said. I'd agree that with all of the variables taken into account (power, weight, drag coefficient), it's looking to be fairly promising.
 

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Getting all engineer, I'd probably say "nominal range", but Jan is the guy who brings us all the numbers (for the statistically inclined among us), no need to nitpick :p
That works too, but nominal range is different from claimed range. WTLP (or EPA in America) is simply a framework for manufacturers to well, manufacture a claimed range. Claimed range put the onus on a manufacturer to be honest and publish a nominal range for most drivers (which they really cannot do for competitive reasons).
 

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That works too, but nominal range is different from claimed range. WTLP (or EPA in America) is simply a framework for manufacturers to well, manufacture a claimed range. Claimed range put the onus on a manufacturer to be honest and publish a nominal range for most drivers (which they really cannot do for competitive reasons).
Fair enough.
 

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Wouldn’t a better battery, hold charge better and more efficiently? That would lower your cost…
I guess I’m not understanding how you view consumption? Isn’t that how much you use it? And your fuel cost is set by your electric company, not any car manufacturers.

lighter and smaller I am fine with, but we are past fixing that on this model.

more confused than before, sorry.
aaah now I see. No battery tech does not matter. It's about aerodynamics, weight and efficiency of the motors.

I'm happy with a lower non SUV car that is only 2WD and with a lower top speed (100mph is more then I need really) and so on. This would make the car use less electricity per mile driven aka less "fuel"-cost. Makes it easier to justify a higher price than buying the normal petrol or diesel car for much less money.

Specially if traveling on superchargers the cost per kWh over here is ridiculous Like $1-$1.50 for the faster ones. So also here it's important for a car that is efficient as in using little energy per mile.

Range I really don't care about as long as it's over 100miles on the highway, I still need to stop every now and then as I got a 7yo girl.

Also Europe is different form USA. Even a used Nissan Leaf from 2012 would end up in the ocean before the battery was depleted pretty much any direction you aim here LOL!!
 

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aaah now I see. No battery tech does not matter. It's about aerodynamics, weight and efficiency of the motors.

I'm happy with a lower non SUV car that is only 2WD and with a lower top speed (100mph is more then I need really) and so on. This would make the car use less electricity per mile driven aka less "fuel"-cost. Makes it easier to justify a higher price than buying the normal petrol or diesel car for much less money.

Specially if traveling on superchargers the cost per kWh over here is ridiculous Like $1-$1.50 for the faster ones. So also here it's important for a car that is efficient as in using little energy per mile.

Range I really don't care about as long as it's over 100miles on the highway, I still need to stop every now and then as I got a 7yo girl.

Also Europe is different form USA. Even a used Nissan Leaf from 2012 would end up in the ocean before the battery was depleted pretty much any direction you aim here LOL!!
This makes much more sense now, thank you for taking the time to explain it more. I was initially thinking you might just be hating on the car, but after understanding your side it makes much more sense. I even agree with you! I will most likely never or only a few times break 90 mph, let alone 100. And I would prefer a nice small hatchback. If we had a better market in the USA for hatchbacks like you do in Europe, I wouldn't even be looking at this car.
 

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Here's another data point... His results were really quite poor, that is rather worrisome. That number doesn't track with other reports, which is pretty strange. I'd be surprised if weather could have that dramatic an effect on efficiency. Consumption more than 2x optimal
 

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Here's another data point... His results were really quite poor, that is rather worrisome. That number doesn't track with other reports, which is pretty strange. I'd be surprised if weather could have that dramatic an effect on efficiency. Consumption more than 2x optimal
Not great, but rolling resistance is substantially increased in the rain and he was going 133 kmh/82 mph. Nice to see that the heat pump was working efficiently at least.
 

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I'd be surprised if weather could have that dramatic an effect on efficiency. Consumption more than 2x optimal
Weather, temperature, and speed DO have a dramatic effect on efficiency for any EV car. For example, increasing speed from 90 to 130 km/h will theoretically roughly double the efficiency number (so, for example, 16 kWh/100km would become 32 kWh/100km) due to the quadratic relation between these variables.
 
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Weather, temperature, and speed DO have a dramatic effect on efficiency for any EV car. For example, increasing speed from 90 to 130 km/h will theoretically roughly double the efficiency number (so, for example, 16 kWh/100km would become 32 kWh/100km) due to the quadratic relation between these variables.
And that was the P45 edition, so it would have lost ~5+% efficiency due to the 20" wheels. But yeah, sorry, I am perhaps a bit more concerned about range than I ought to be. Realistically, I rarely ever exceed perhaps ~70 mph myself, though even that would probably be less than ideal.
 

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And that was the P45 edition, so it would have lost ~5+% efficiency due to the 20" wheels.
I'm thinking the 255 20" tyres (as opposed to 235 on the 19") contribute to a lot more than 5% drop, at least in those conditions (speed, weather).

Have a look at this other German youtuber who managed this result in the RWD 58kWh model, on seemingly the same day (definitely still raining, but perhaps less wherever he was in Germany), with 11km/h lower average speed.

34316
 

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And that was the P45 edition, so it would have lost ~5+% efficiency due to the 20" wheels. But yeah, sorry, I am perhaps a bit more concerned about range than I ought to be. Realistically, I rarely ever exceed perhaps ~70 mph myself, though even that would probably be less than ideal.
If range is a serious issue at high speeds for you, I think you’d be better off waiting for the Ioniq 6 in 2022. It will have much lower drag coefficient, but uses the same batteries & engines. Should be much better at higher speeds.

Kia EV6 might also be an option but while undoubtedly better than I5 at speed it won’t be as slippery as the I6.
 

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If range is a serious issue at high speeds for you, I think you’d be better off waiting for the Ioniq 6 in 2022. It will have much lower drag coefficient, but uses the same batteries & engines. Should be much better at higher speeds.

Kia EV6 might also be an option but while undoubtedly better than I5 at speed it won’t be as slippery as the I6.
I'm probably just taking one datapoint too seriously. But I guess we'll see when we have more numbers. I'd be curious to see what efficiency looks like in better weather and/or at more realistic speeds. I drive a Mazda3 right now, the switch to an EV will (whenever that happens) probably take some getting used to in any case. If the I5 can realistically manage ~200+ miles on the highway (assuming 19" wheels, depending on availability on different configs) it would probably be be enough for me (I have one particular route I drive occasionally in mind where there are currently no charging stations, though there's supposed to be one planned for this year)
 

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If the I5 can realistically manage ~200+ miles on the highway (assuming 19" wheels, depending on availability on different configs) it would probably be be enough for me
FWIW, the Korean Ioniq 5 catalog lists highway ranges of 202 to 226 miles for the 72.6 kWh pack, and North America gets a 77 kWh one eh?

Have a look at this other German youtuber who managed this result in the RWD 58kWh model, on seemingly the same day (definitely still raining, but perhaps less wherever he was in Germany), with 11km/h lower average speed.
I noticed that the display shows 22.5 kWh/100km, which is about 4.4 km/kWh... which is pretty close to the Korean highway efficiency spec for 2WD LR. I guess they optimised for cruising at ~100 kph.
 

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Apologies if this is already addressed, but does anyone know whether mileage figures are recorded separately for sport, comfort and eco modes? Just watched a video review that said Ioniq 5 in eco mode only uses rear drive wheels, so would like to see the range in each mode.
 

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Apologies if this is already addressed, but does anyone know whether mileage figures are recorded separately for sport, comfort and eco modes? Just watched a video review that said Ioniq 5 in eco mode only uses rear drive wheels, so would like to see the range in each mode.
I don't think there will be official figures for each because it would get even more confusing, as in an AWD model i believe Sport engages both motors full time, and will likely increase consumption significantly even whilst cruising, whereas on the RWD model it obviously can't engage a motor than doesn't exist, and with no gearing i'd imagine it has very little effect to consumption whilst cruising, but probably does in a stop/start scenario.
 

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I don't think there will be official figures for each because it would get even more confusing, as in an AWD model i believe Sport engages both motors full time, and will likely increase consumption significantly even whilst cruising, whereas on the RWD model it obviously can't engage a motor than doesn't exist, and with no gearing i'd imagine it has very little effect to consumption whilst cruising, but probably does in a stop/start scenario.
So are official figures for AWD (& other versions for that matter) take in eco mode? Or even eco+ mode?
 

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So are official figures for AWD (& other versions for that matter) take in eco mode? Or even eco+ mode?
i don’t know if it has been stated anywhere, but I think given the three modes are called Eco, Normal and Sport in the videos I’ve seen, I would hope the official figures come from Normal mode.
 
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