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Discussion Starter #1
Any idea why a public (Engenie) charger that should do 50kw is only getting 20-35kw?

There are only 2 charge bays and I’m only one in use so it’s not split across the 2 or anything.. any ideas?

mom talking about below 80% too.. I know above that it drops
 

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The 38.3 kWh Ioniq charge rate is never above about 43kW and drops to the mid-high 30s at a little over 50% SOC, and drops again at the high 60s SOC, etc., according to the graph here: Charging with a Hyundai Ioniq. (see yellow line). It's slower when cold, too. The graph is borne out by my own experience (subjectively; I have never sat there watching it for a prolonged period; just random samples). It doesn't go any faster on a higher rated charger, either.

But do bear in mind when looking at the graph (in case you compare to the 28kWh battery also shown - 100% SOC on a 28 is equal (in range terms) to 73% SOC in a 38. So, for a range-based comparison, you need to stretch the yellow line out by an extra third or so.
 

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Unfortunately there are many things that govern the actual charge rate that you will get when you plug into a 50kW capable charger. At a very low SOC you MIGHT see as much as 43kW with the 2020 Ioniq - the battery has a low nominal voltage which limits charge rate.

Based on the battery being at 20degC, you should see...

SOC 0 to 50% is around 40kW rising to 43kW as the voltage level in the battery increases.

SOC 53% to 67% is around 35kW rising to 37kW as the voltage level in the battery increases.

SOC 68% to 74% is around 23kW rising to 24kW as the voltage level in the battery increases.

SOC 75% to 85% is around 14kW constant.

There are four fixed steps of charge rate as shown above. Between each level the charge rate tapers rapidly.

If the battery is at a lower or higher temperature these values will decrease.
 

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charged mine last week on 50kwh ccs, had 40% remaining, charged at 41kwh up to 80% then dropped to 21%, unplugged at 86% as finished lunch and ready to carry on with journey!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wow ok that surprises me.. I'd just assumed it would charge at the speed of the charger
Has Hyundai officially said anything about this? I think if more people knew this it would hinder sales?
is this the same with other EV's?
 

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Wow ok that surprises me.. I'd just assumed it would charge at the speed of the charger
Has Hyundai officially said anything about this? I think if more people knew this it would hinder sales?
is this the same with other EV's?
Hyundai state 50 mins from 0% to 80%, with caveates. They do not release the charge curve. This is common for all EV suppliers. Try owning a 2018 Leaf they have really slow charge rates because the battery overheats due to no cooling.

A constant 50kW the Ioniq would charge to 80% in 36 minutes, which is not possible for the 2020 Ioniq.

It is better for the battery that a lower charge rate is used. If you actualy own the car rather than renting it then charging on your home charger at 7kW is best for battery life.
 

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You get best DC charge rates between 0 to 60 % 47kw
Slows even more at 80% but all EVs that look after the battery do this.
See YouTube link
 

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Yeah that is normal, I've only charged on a rapid twice so far. First time was in fairly cold conditions from about 40%, and only got around 27kw.
Recently I tried it in much warmer temps ie 20C but after a pretty warm day and a long drive, from about 18% battery and got low 40s kw.
So trick is to try to arrive at charger as low battery as possible, and at as high temperature as possible.
 

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Ioniq 2020 38kWh
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I have used fast charger for the first time at Lidl 50 kWh, arrived with approx 44%. By the time wife finished shopping battery was up to 80%. It was charging at 38kW at first but dropped to 28 kW at around 70%. Car is great btw but I wish that a) battery had bigger capacity (like Kona) and b) charging speed was higher.
 

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You arn't alone. The highest I have ever seen my one go is 35kW. I think this is to try and make the batteries last longer. Worst of all with AC charging below 50% it only charges at around 5.5kW
 

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Power is volts multiplied by amps, and a 50 kW charger maxes out at 125 amps. At 400 volts that's 50 kW, but the 2020 Ioniq has a lower voltage battery pack than most cars (including the old Ioniq) so you get a lower maximum. Then of course depending on the present state of the battery pack (charge level, temperature, cell balance) the car's Battery Management System (BMS) further limits the charge current to maximize battery life, resulting in an even slower charge.

A 100 kW charging station can output up to 250 amps, so it's capable of delivering more power at lower voltages. The Ioniq does take advantage of this, but only if the batteries are really warm and rather empty. Still, the difference in the 2020 Ioniq isn't all that much (and I think still under 50 kW, although more than a 50 kW station could deliver) so it's probably not worth the extra money unless you're in a serious rush.
 

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Power is volts multiplied by amps, and a 50 kW charger maxes out at 125 amps. At 400 volts that's 50 kW, but the 2020 Ioniq has a lower voltage battery pack than most cars (including the old Ioniq) so you get a lower maximum. Then of course depending on the present state of the battery pack (charge level, temperature, cell balance) the car's Battery Management System (BMS) further limits the charge current to maximize battery life, resulting in an even slower charge.

A 100 kW charging station can output up to 250 amps, so it's capable of delivering more power at lower voltages. The Ioniq does take advantage of this, but only if the batteries are really warm and rather empty. Still, the difference in the 2020 Ioniq isn't all that much (and I think still under 50 kW, although more than a 50 kW station could deliver) so it's probably not worth the extra money unless you're in a serious rush.
Just out of curiosity, do you happen do know how many KV the motor is??
 
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