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Well if anything can be taken from the photo, it's a fact that my battery after 110000 miles is still in a decent state, to a degree at least.
Well, or that your display is still working. Not that we can measure it with the software reserves built into the the display, but I don't expect any noticeable change in function of the the HEV battery under any reasonable car lifespan. Super conservative battery management system. On the Niro forum, a member sold his car with 157,000 miles on it with no noticeable drop in efficiency at that point. Even trying to stress the battery with full charge and discharge cycles (possible with high speed driving and then normal driving in Sport mode), it will be difficult to impact battery life I think.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, or that your display is still working. Not that we can measure it with the software reserves built into the the display, but I don't expect any noticeable change in function of the the HEV battery under any reasonable car lifespan. Super conservative battery management system. On the Niro forum, a member sold his car with 157,000 miles on it with no noticeable drop in efficiency at that point. Even trying to stress the battery with full charge and discharge cycles (possible with high speed driving and then normal driving in Sport mode), it will be difficult to impact battery life I think.
Am I missing something here??
Is there anywhere in the manual that advises SPORT mode to be used for no more that a specific length of time or distance??
It's just that I'm receiving vibes that are telling me iv broke some kind of unwritten rule.🤔🤔
No apologies just yet, at least, not until something has been confirmed 😉😉
 

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I'd be interested to know what the fuel economy was over this journey keeping it in Sport and also the average speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'd be interested to know what the fuel economy was over this journey keeping it in Sport and also the average speed.
It was 14.9 miles that took I'd estimate 28/30 minutes.
I'll be doing the the same journey again on a couple of days so may just take a look a bit deeper.
 

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Am I missing something here??
Is there anywhere in the manual that advises SPORT mode to be used for no more that a specific length of time or distance??
It's just that I'm receiving vibes that are telling me iv broke some kind of unwritten rule.🤔🤔
No apologies just yet, at least, not until something has been confirmed 😉😉
There's zero guidance on the correct or appropriate use of sport mode, and no unwritten rule to break. It's your car, and you are totally free to drive it any which way you wish to, within the boundary of what is safe for you and other road users.

But.... (there's always one of those after all), the question in this instance is: Does using sport mode (which typically uses more fuel) to gain a fully charged traction battery, actually gain you anything in terms of fuel efficiency - meaning that by using more fuel to charge the battery to maximum, did that battery charge result in being able to drive the car at least an equal distance using the stored charge that you used in fuel to get the stored charge.

I would think that is the reason for the response you got, because the only real purpose for the hybrid drive system in the first place is to gain a fuel-efficient advantage over 'normal' cars. Well, environmental benefits too of course, but those tend to revolve around fuel-efficiency too.

Again though, how you drive your own car is your business, and your business alone. For myself, I'd be interested in experimenting to see how the use of sport mode as you used it would impact my fuel consumption, negatively, positively or not at all. Most of us would probably expect a negative impact because the conversion of energy from fuel to battery charge and the subsequent use of that power to drive the car would normally result in efficiency losses rather than gains. But even if so, there's nothing wrong with experimenting!
 

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A good test may be to exhaust the EV range to 0, then drive in sport mode untill it is fully charged to the 29 mile EV range. If it takes less than 29 miles to fully charge it, then it is worth it, does this makes sense?

Driving in sports mode yields around 35 mpg, so if we average this with the EV range we gain we can get the total average mpg.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There's zero guidance on the correct or appropriate use of sport mode, and no unwritten rule to break. It's your car, and you are totally free to drive it any which way you wish to, within the boundary of what is safe for you and other road users.

But.... (there's always one of those after all), the question in this instance is: Does using sport mode (which typically uses more fuel) to gain a fully charged traction battery, actually gain you anything in terms of fuel efficiency - meaning that by using more fuel to charge the battery to maximum, did that battery charge result in being able to drive the car at least an equal distance using the stored charge that you used in fuel to get the stored charge.

I would think that is the reason for the response you got, because the only real purpose for the hybrid drive system in the first place is to gain a fuel-efficient advantage over 'normal' cars. Well, environmental benefits too of course, but those tend to revolve around fuel-efficiency too.

Again though, how you drive your own car is your business, and your business alone. For myself, I'd be interested in experimenting to see how the use of sport mode as you used it would impact my fuel consumption, negatively, positively or not at all. Most of us would probably expect a negative impact because the conversion of energy from fuel to battery charge and the subsequent use of that power to drive the car would normally result in efficiency losses rather than gains. But even if so, there's nothing wrong with experimenting!
Andy, agree 100% with everything you've added.
Id never use sports mode thinking for one moment it may benefit my fuel consumption. Once in a while to get out of possible difficulty. The purpose of the drive in question was merely to see how far I could charge the battery. Possibly a mad moment.
Going on the fact I drive 200 miles daily, in the grand scheme of things it's not going to be that detrimental to my overall figures.
I though, like you are intrigued on what mpg is on that particular journey so I will continue to experiment further.
Obviously results shall appear here in good time.
 

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....Possibly a mad moment....
Personally, I don't think so. My experience of hybrids since I first bought one 12 or 13 years ago is that they are peculiar things from which it is hard to extract the best without trying out how they work, seeing the results of driving styles and use, and developing a learning curve for their performance and behaviours - even quirks.

While the Ioniq is far more like a 'normal' car than the Priuses I had before, I think there is much to gain from a better understanding of how the car works and what is, and isn't, effective in driving techniques.
 

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I've reached 100% SOC several times.
I live 33 km away from a winter ski resort (1000 meters height difference). I am using Sport mode to get there (about 15km of steep bending road) and while descending I reach 100% SOC after about 50% into the descent because of the regenerative braking. After that the engine kicks in to provide engine breaking and I suppose that causes the electric motor to use battery power because the current generated (1 green bar while depressing hard the brake pedal) has nowhere to be stored in. This is what I think, I am not sure of this, but while engine braking is engaged the battery is for sure depleting as I loose battery bar and then the engine stops. After a while again 100% and the engine kicks in.
 

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The OP has a hybrid. Using gasoline in your internal combustion engine to charge your battery is a very inefficient use of the energy contained in the fuel. At best, it is 40% efficient directly coupled to the wheels. Using gas to charge the traction battery and then drive the car with the battery is a fraction of that efficiency. Thus you are getting lower mpg using Sport full time. Which is why I remarked that I hoped doing so was a one time thing.

Something similar is wrong with the description of the PHEV drive above. If you use Sport mode to charge the traction battery, you suffer a similar loss of efficiency. In addition because you did this, you did not recover as much energy from your downhill drive as was possible, also losing efficiency.

I have only once topped off the battery charge in my own hybrid on round trip scenic drive that was 12 miles up, and 12 miles down. At the top, battery was on one click (hybrids use the traction battery to aid the ICE on steep hills). At the bottom, full battery. 25 mph up, 25 mph down on cruise control. Never lost regen, so I may have used some of the buffer battery capacity and had captured more energy than the display could show.

A benefit of a PHEV for certain owners is that they can recover more energy on some hilly roads with extended downhills. The Alex of Alex on Autos video goes over a mountain pass on his daily commute, and the larger battery in PHEVs means he gets better efficiency over similar smaller battery hybrids. But that is a fairly rare situation.
 
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