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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

Is there anyway to force the car to use EV mode while you can see there is enough battery. Seems odd that the car decides this itself.
 

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I've given up trying to understand this, if you get up to speed and then coast, and feather the throttle you can get EV to kick in (sometimes, sometimes not, depending on factors I don't pretend to understand). The thing I found is that there are really 3 modes - engine only, engine + battery and battery only. The little magic "EV" light only comes on in the latter mode, though at other times the car IS using the battery in combination with the engine. You can see this if you have the very distracting flow diagram up. So I have learned not to get TOO obsessed with the EV light being on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. My commute is about 15 miles, equally split between bumper to bumper traffic and 70mph motorway. So it would be ideal for me to use the battery exclusively for the first and the engine for the latter (also charging the battery for the way home).

I think Hyundai have missed a trick with not including an EV selector button. Arguably the PHEV will have it - and I would have had the phev had they released it faster.

Nevertheless I love this car.
 

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Thanks for the replies. My commute is about 15 miles, equally split between bumper to bumper traffic and 70mph motorway. So it would be ideal for me to use the battery exclusively for the first and the engine for the latter (also charging the battery for the way home).

I think Hyundai have missed a trick with not including an EV selector button. Arguably the PHEV will have it - and I would have had the phev had they released it faster.

Nevertheless I love this car.
Well I know absolutely nothing about hybrids, I mainly got it because I liked the shape and spec and low lease price of it and the emissions are low so the benefit in kind tax is reduced. But I was kind of naively thinking you'd be able to do that like you did. I had visions of elegantly gliding round town silently on the battery then charging it up on the motorway, but I guess that's not how it works. Having said that I didn't look into it beforehand so can't really complain. I do find when you are stuck in traffic, just edging along, it is often in EV mode, using no petrol which is good, better than the crude engine shut off thing on some cars.
 

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I think Hyundai have missed a trick with not including an EV selector button. Arguably the PHEV will have it - and I would have had the phev had they released it faster.
Regular Hybrids aren't really designed to run in EV mode, the electric motor is simply there to assist with low rev torque and reduce emissions.
Plug-in Hybrids however, are designed to run in the manner you were hoping for.

But like you, I couldn't wait for the plug-in, so opted for the full EV (and I'm still waiting!)
 

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The Ioniq Hybrid probably has a million lines of code running in its onboard computer to decide when to run the engine.

Based on driving a Prius for 12+ years, there's no way the driver can out-think the car and get it to do what he/she wants. The best thing to do is be as gentle on the throttle as possible, which will increase the probability (but not guarantee) that the car will only use the battery if all other conditions are right, and then just relax and enjoy it.

True story--many years ago, when I took my Prius to get a state inspection sticker, part of the process involved an emissions test where the engine idles while a gas probe sniffs the exhaust. Well, the inspector had not been trained on how to handle Prii, for which that part of the test is waived because you CANNOT make the engine idle while the car is sitting still. Oh, there are SOME conditions (again, it's software-controlled) such as having the heater or A/C on full-blast with a mostly depleted battery, that MAY cause the engine to run while the car is not moving. But you can't MAKE it run.

The inspector absolutely insisted that the car had to idle for the test, and he refused to be convinced that it can't be done. I ended up taking the car to a different inspection station where at least someone knew how to handle it.
 

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Regular Hybrids aren't really designed to run in EV mode, the electric motor is simply there to assist with low rev torque and reduce emissions.
Plug-in Hybrids however, are designed to run in the manner you were hoping for.

But like you, I couldn't wait for the plug-in, so opted for the full EV (and I'm still waiting!)
For the Ioniq/Niro with the dual clutch, EV substitutes for first/reverse gear. The engine might be running, perhaps for climate conditioning (or possibly to charge the battery), but the motor provides all the motive power from a stop. For the Prius with a CVT, it can and does take off from a start with engine only.

I'm holding out for the plug-in, at least until I learn more.
 

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I find it rather easy to force the car into electric mode when I want it to.
If you get to know the car, and monitor what it does in normal driving mode, you will learn all the conditions needed to let the car do what you want. On short trips it's difficult, but on longer trips (>20km) or if you do more trips in a short period of time, without letting the engine cool down too much, it is fun and easy to play with forced EV modes to get better fuel economy.
When the car needs warming-up, the ICE is always running, but within a few blocks it's warm enough to switch to EV mode if the battery has enough power. When the car is warm and the battery indicator is near 2/3, it needs little playing with the throttle to switch to EV mode at a constant speed up to 90km/h on local roads. Even at highways with speeds of 110-130 km/h EV mode is possible for short periods of time. Of coarse, it's a small battery, so you will need to run the ICE and charge the battery often.
 

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True story--many years ago, when I took my Prius to get a state inspection sticker, part of the process involved an emissions test where the engine idles while a gas probe sniffs the exhaust. Well, the inspector had not been trained on how to handle Prii, for which that part of the test is waived because you CANNOT make the engine idle while the car is sitting still. Oh, there are SOME conditions (again, it's software-controlled) such as having the heater or A/C on full-blast with a mostly depleted battery, that MAY cause the engine to run while the car is not moving. But you can't MAKE it run.

The inspector absolutely insisted that the car had to idle for the test, and he refused to be convinced that it can't be done. I ended up taking the car to a different inspection station where at least someone knew how to handle it.
Was it more than ten years ago? I haven't seen that method used in at least that long. They just hook up to the computer nowadays. I seem to be able to kick on the ICE in my Prius c at will by holding down on the brake and flooring the accelerator. It sometimes takes a couple of cycles but when the car realizes you're flooring it but it's not going anywhere, it thinks it needs more power and kicks it on.
 

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I toyed with the idea of the Plug-in and eventually decided against it. For two reasons;

- I had an existing vehicle on a contract that end on 28th February and didn't want to mess about waiting for the Plug-In and the EV is range is too short for me.
- The operating inefficiencies of an ICE and conventional braking appall me, Diesels are horrible dirty things. I'm primarily interested in getting a more efficient system through Kinetic Energy recovery.

As a result I'm just going to let the car's systems decide the best way to conserve energy. Had it not been for the launch of the Ionic I would probably have looked at either at the Prius, Auris or Lexus CT200H. Although, I really dislike both the interior and exterior of the new Prius and I had my doubts about its suitability for long motorway cruising.

It seems to me that the Hyundai HEV solution will suit my requirements better. ...time will tell!
 

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DaveAZ,

It may have been right about at the 10-year-ago mark, because it was probably the first inspection after the original new-car two-year sticker expired. Or a year or two later.

In Texas, the type of inspection you get depends on the age of the car (among other things). My 1978 Datsun 280Z just gets a safety inspection because it's more than 25 years old (although it always used to absolutely ace the emissions tests when it got them), the Prius gets safety only, and my two newer cars (2007 and 2014) get the OBD plug treatment. I haven't paid enough attention when I'm at the inspection station to notice if there are still vehicles that get the tailpipe probe test.
 

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This is an old topic, but i write anyway. One trick I actually use is that, if the engine doesn’t shut off when the foot is lifted off the throttle, then a light tap on the brake pedal will turn off the engine right away. And then you can drive in EV mode more often. This also works with Toyota and Lexus hybrids.
 

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This is an old topic, but i write anyway. One trick I actually use is that, if the engine doesn’t shut off when the foot is lifted off the throttle, then a light tap on the brake pedal will turn off the engine right away. And then you can drive in EV mode more often. This also works with Toyota and Lexus hybrids.
Works for me too
 
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