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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand that the US Ionic 5 will get 2 years free charging from Electrify America. Unlike most other posters, I don's want the maximum charging rate. I want to extend the life of the battery so plan to use the lowest charging rate that Electrify America provides. I understand this is 50kW with the CHAdeMO connector? I can charge at 50kW for the free 1/2 hr daily and if necessary top it off to 80% using the home charger, for which I would have to pay.

I guess a 50kW charging rate should not hurt a car designed for 350kW charging rate?

So the question is: Can I use the Electrify America CHAdeMO plug with the Ionic 5?

Thanks
 

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I understand that the US Ionic 5 will get 2 years free charging from Electrify America. Unlike most other posters, I don's want the maximum charging rate. I want to extend the life of the battery so plan to use the lowest charging rate that Electrify America provides. I understand this is 50kW with the CHAdeMO connector? I can charge at 50kW for the free 1/2 hr daily and if necessary top it off to 80% using the home charger, for which I would have to pay.

I guess a 50kW charging rate should not hurt a car designed for 350kW charging rate?

So the question is: Can I use the Electrify America CHAdeMO plug with the Ionic 5?

Thanks
No - different standards. Won't physically fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is disappointing. So if one uses the CCS connector, can one limit the charging rate or does the car and Electrify America decide what that is ? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes the location near my house has a level 2 charger. I do not know if it is a J1172. I am sorry I am a complete newbie at this. Thank you for helping.
 

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Yes the location near my house has a level 2 charger. I do not know if it is a J1172. I am sorry I am a complete newbie at this. Thank you for helping.
There’s also an option to limit charging currents in the EV settings menu, both DC and AC, didn’t try it myself while using the 350kW charger.

edit: I just checked, the current limit is for AC only. Apologies.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have you calculated the cost of charging at home? It's a lot more convenient to just plug in at home.
I guess the main cost will be about a thousand dollars to install a 240V circuit in the garage. Plus whatever the charger will cost. I was considering the feasibility of delaying that for a couple of years after spending all the cash buying the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There’s also an option to limit charging currents in the EV settings menu, both DC and AC, didn’t try it myself while using the 350kW charger.
OK. That may work. So if I hook up the car to a CCS station I can limit the power input in a menu in the car? I understand the CCS station can provide up to 359 kW. I am thinking limiting charging power to one tenth of the maximum at 35kW on a daily basis may be gentler on the battery unless one is in a real hurry.
 

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OK. That may work. So if I hook up the car to a CCS station I can limit the power input in a menu in the car? I understand the CCS station can provide up to 359 kW. I am thinking limiting charging power to one tenth of the maximum at 35kW on a daily basis may be gentler on the battery unless one is in a real hurry.
I really would not worry about it that much. There are plenty of EVs out there that have been charging regularly to 100% and using rapid chargers for years.
 
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OK. That may work. So if I hook up the car to a CCS station I can limit the power input in a menu in the car? I understand the CCS station can provide up to 359 kW. I am thinking limiting charging power to one tenth of the maximum at 35kW on a daily basis may be gentler on the battery unless one is in a real hurry.
You may want to consider other people that need to use a decidedly limited resource, as well. If you excessively limit your charging speed, you're going to have to occupy the charging station significantly longer to get your desired charge level. Not suggesting you don't limit if you deem it necessary, but please do take others into account.

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TriPut is correct, if you occupy a 350kW charger going from 20 - 80% at 35kW, you are really going to annoy anyone waiting, and ‘I’m being kind to my battery’ wouldn’t wash.

May one enquire as to the need for this plan of action? Is the 8 year/100k mile (at least here in Europe) battery warranty not a clear enough signal that the battery can cope?
 

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OK. That may work. So if I hook up the car to a CCS station I can limit the power input in a menu in the car? I understand the CCS station can provide up to 359 kW. I am thinking limiting charging power to one tenth of the maximum at 35kW on a daily basis may be gentler on the battery unless one is in a real hurry.
Theoretically, yes, but why even use the 350kW in that case? There should be slower ones that you can use, as the HPC chargers are used by travellers needing quick charging.
 

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You may want to consider other people that need to use a decidedly limited resource, as well. If you excessively limit your charging speed, you're going to have to occupy the charging station significantly longer to get your desired charge level. Not suggesting you don't limit if you deem it necessary, but please do take others into account.

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The OP suggested they would limit the charging session to the free 30 mins they have regardless of charge speed.

This opens up a different philosophical question though. When talking of opening up the Tesla network back in the summer Musk suggested that low charging EVs could get charged an extra charge over and above the regular non-Tesla charge, for you know, being slow. Without any details. I don’t believe the pilot out of the Netherlands implements such a pricing strategy though.

In Canada due to some sort of regulation (that Tesla is trying to get changes) dc chargers charge by the minute. In a way it’s good as it “punishes” those occupying chargers when they’re in the 80%+ range.
 

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I believe in Canada, they aren't able to 'resell' power. So they can charge for parking at the spot -- which doesn't allow them to vary the charge based on the speed of charge.
 

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I guess the main cost will be about a thousand dollars to install a 240V circuit in the garage. Plus whatever the charger will cost. I was considering the feasibility of delaying that for a couple of years after spending all the cash buying the car.
Can you charge with the Level 1 charger that comes with the car? That might be enough to keep you 'topped' up for daily use. If you end up using the car a lot, you can then use a L2 or DC L3
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thank you all. I guess I was a little spooked because I have read that heat is the enemy of batteries and dendritic growth is a major cause of battery degradation. So I was thinking that on a daily basis it is probably better to not fast charge to preserve battery life. I am close to retirement so this may be my last nice car so I would like it to maintain range for 10-15 years at least.

The batteries in iphones and ipads are horrible. They lose capacity in a couple of years and after there years they are almost useless unless the device is plugged in.
 

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Electrify America chargers are not only 350 kW. They have them down to 50 kW, even in CCS format. Check Plugshare.com to see what's near you. I think it may also be possible to get an adapter for CHAdeMO that includes the electronics to translate the communications between protocols. But keep in mind that CHAdeMO is a dead standard walking. No new vehicles support it and it will gradually disappear.

Also, I second the suggestion to try your L1 charging brick to see if that satisfies your needs. It does for quite a lot of people. Also, some L1 bricks are capable of what's called universal input, typically 90-250 VAC, 50-60 Hz. If the one that Hyundai supplies in the US is like that, see if you have any 240 V outlets in your garage. If so, get an adapter for that outlet (and a stout extension cord if needed) and you'll double the output of your brick. Bare-bones L2 charging at almost no cost. Or if the Hyundai brick isn't universal input, you can get one on Amazon for $200 or less.

L2 is admittedly more convenient, but $1000 just for the wiring sounds like a wild, overly-expensive guess. I've already wired for one in my previous house and am about to do it in my current one. If you understand house wiring it's not hard, but if you're not comfortable with it you're better off having it done. It's worth calling an electrician for an estimate. Your situation may not warrant anywhere near that kind of expenditure.

I'd stay with a 14-50 outlet and an EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment or L2 charger) that plugs into it. Those are limited to 40 amp running on a 50 amp circuit (which must be de-rated to 80% for continuous (over 1 hr) use), meaning you can get 240 V x 40 A = 9.6 kW max out of it. That's not as much as the Ioniq 5 will accept, but it's all you'll need and makes it possible to unplug it and take it with you for travel if that helps you. Anything more than a 40 amp EVSE needs to be hard-wired.
 
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