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Howdy all, I've got three purchasing choices ahead of me I'd like to make in the next few days to a week. Goal: To keep the car for the next several years or so with minimal issues and lowest operating cost and debt management.

1.2016 Prius two with 41,416 miles at $18,544 minus $5700 in trade

2. 2016 Prius 3 touring with 25k miles at $22k out the door minus $5k in trade, if I decide to trade instead of private sell my old car for about $7500. Got the dealer down to $22k even, which I think is fair price for this car.

3. Black 2018 Hyundai Ioniq SEL (new) $19,416 after trade and all dealer fees included.

Questions:

1. How reliable can I expect either prius to be for the next 7 years? Especially the higher mileage prius linked first. I figured there would be some former prius drivers in here that could chime in.

2. The Ioniq is very appealing because it is new, close to the price of the P3 touring, comes with a 10 year/100k mile warranty, and life time battery replacement.

I've driven the Ioniq and P3 touring, and while the Ioniq is technically superior (which is nice to have), I think I enjoyed the P3 touring better. I need to test drive them both again soon. Plus, I can get 0% interest for 60 months which helps a great deal. But driving the car was weird for me. I drive a c-max and formally a prius, and I'm accustomed to being able to tell how to manage EV mode and keep it there. Like, in the Ioniq, I couldn't figure out how much throttle I could give it before it dropped out of EV mode and into ICE.

Either prius is cheaper in insurance and registration costs. I'm leaning towards the prius because it is cheaper up front and over the next 2-4 years considering insurance, registration and payment with interest. I'm going to another test drive of the P3 and the Ioniq in the next day or two. I should also recalculate costs considering 0% interest over 60 months for the Ioniq.

What do you guys think? Former prius owners especially.
 

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How risk averse are you? The prius has a very proven track record as a high mile reliable vehicle so the relative risk between 41k and 25k miles is about the same - with either one you have no warranty so a direct comaparison with a new Ioniq should include the cost of an extended warranty.

Over seven years the differences are probably small so the question is if you will be happy driving each of these cars in five years? Or will you get tired of driving a car with fewer creature comforts and trade in early?
 

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Fwiw I have had 2 Toyota hybrids an Auris (Toyota Corolla elswere in the world) and a 2016 RAV4. Both were 100% reliable and pleasant to drive. The beauty of the Toyota design is that the planetary gear for the engine and electric motor means that it is very unlikely to go wrong. I moved to the Ioniq because I fancied a PHEV and the Prius PHEV only has 4 seats. I also like the looks of the Ioniq. I'm pleased with it so far and I'm unlikely to keep it longer than the warranty so while it would be a pain if it was unreliable at least it would get sorted. Indications are that reliability will be fine.
 

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Hey I'm an Ioniq owner (electric) but I have no brand loyalty, just whatever is better. From your choices, I'd go with the Prius, especially if you can find one or knock the price down further.
 

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I've had my 2017 Hyundai ionic sel 3 years now, bought off the Hyundai dealership new. I've had no issues or problems in 25,000 trouble free miles
 

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I would go with the newer Prius if those were my options. I love my Ioniq but if I were going hybrid or phev, I would weigh the Prius more heavily as I think Toyota’s hybrid drivetrain is just better. You will never have a driveline issue in a Prius, I can’t say that for sure with the Ioniq hybrids.
 

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I would disagree, the CVT of the Prius is fine for economy as it’s a constantly changing gear, but for towing I would be a bit dubious , The Dual clutch gearbox of the Iconiq is basically a straight gearbox with two clutches so it can change seamlessly between any gears, IMO much stronger,
The first CVT where the old DAF44 in the sixties and these were always going wrong with broken drive belts, then the later cars had a steel belt under tremendous load to drive the car, Ford/Fiat/Nissan/Volvo all threw many millions at the CVT to make it reliable but I have never been convinced it’s as strong as a conventional gearbox albeit computer controlled,
 

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The Prius has a longer history of reliability but I just despise how (floaty) it feels when you drive it, for that reason I'd go with the Ioniq if I were you. You will have confirm what warranty you get if you buy the Ioniq used including confirming it was not used in a manner that voids warranties.

Nitpick: Posts like this should probably be on the General forum and not "New member introduction" forum.
 

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I would disagree, the CVT of the Prius is fine for economy as it’s a constantly changing gear, but for towing I would be a bit dubious , The Dual clutch gearbox of the Iconiq is basically a straight gearbox with two clutches so it can change seamlessly between any gears, IMO much stronger,
The first CVT where the old DAF44 in the sixties and these were always going wrong with broken drive belts, then the later cars had a steel belt under tremendous load to drive the car, Ford/Fiat/Nissan/Volvo all threw many millions at the CVT to make it reliable but I have never been convinced it’s as strong as a conventional gearbox albeit computer controlled,
The Prius CVT is nothing like a conventional CVT. It has no clutches or actuators of any type. Just 2 differential gear sets and 2 electric motor/generators. The variable gear ratio is just managed by the amount of power put into or taken out of the 2 motors. Because of its mechanical simplicity it is extraordinarily reliable and durable.
 

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So why call it a CVT. (constant variable transmission ). My memories of the CVT were all bad and that alone would be enough to discount it,
A conventional mechanical gearbox with twin clutches have be in use since the forties and also proved to be extremely reliable, Albeit the Iconiq is robotised clutch controlled but that has also been proven reliable,
We may have a different opinion but mine is based on my Personal experience Over the years, hence my purchase of the Iconiq,
 

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Common usage of a term, like associating CVT with Prius, doesn't it make it technically correct. While from a driver's perspective, the Prius feels very similar to real CVTs, the underpinnings are very different. And it is more reliable than anything with a clutch which by design is a consumable (though with a long life in typical designs or with good driving techniques), and of which the Ioniq has three. Nothing wrong in principle with dual clutch designs or many other transmission designs, and while from the driver's perspective may be more enjoyable (which accounts for a lot of Ioniq sales), that doesn't make them better than the Prius design for use in personal transportation.
 
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