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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Don't get into an accident with your Ioniq. Advanced body assembly and materials coupled with a lack of collision repair information from Hyundai could make repairs difficult according to an article by Repairer Driven News:

...Hyundai built the Ioniq hood, tailgate, bumper beams and parts of the suspension out of aluminum, calling it 45 percent lighter than steel for those applications.

The rest of the car has more than 50 percent of advanced-high-strength steel, some of which is probably really ultra-high-strength steel based on where it’s located in diagrams Hyundai Global provided in January and the graphic’s reference to “hot-stamping.”...
...Unfortunately, Hyundai doesn’t reallly share OEM collision repair information with the U.S., though its subsidiary Kia does, according to I-CAR...
Let's hope Hyundai will be forthcoming with repair info so body shops can repair Ioniqs correctly.

 

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And I bet by now insurance companies are doing their research to figure out how much to charge us, it's not going to be nice. Just ake sure to call insurance and get a quote before even signing papers on the Ioniq.

I'm with statefarm and typically they're good, being one of the biggest.
 

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Right or wrong, I dismissed it as a lot about nothing. Repair shops have been repairing Hyundai vehicles for a long time, and I cannot imagine that the Ioniq incorporates a new exotic repair technique. The hybrid system may require special expertise, but no more so than a Prius, Tesla, Volt or Leaf.

BUT .... it is always good to check with the insurance company.
 

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I'm sure the repair shops will figure it out or somehow get their hands on the OEM collision repair information. The painful part is painting aluminum and fixing scratches, etc on it. The material is hard to work with and auto shops needs to get a $40,000 to $60,000 aluminum "clean room" in order to work with the ioniq, doubt most garages have one of these rooms.
 

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The bumper beams and parts of the suspension aren't out in the open to get scratched and you can easily wrap the Ioniq hood and tailgate with clear bra to prevent scratches in those areas. Aluminium paint repairs shouldn't be a problem. More concerned with the garages getting their hands on OEM parts if Hyundai wants to make it hard for them.
 

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You think ioniq is bad wait til the Prius Prime hit the market. The hatch is made of carbon fiber. It's probably unrepairable once rear ended. Then you if the concave rear window didn't break, they gonna have to extract it without breaking it.
 

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You think ioniq is bad wait til the Prius Prime hit the market. The hatch is made of carbon fiber. It's probably unrepairable once rear ended. Then you if the concave rear window didn't break, they gonna have to extract it without breaking it.

carbon fiber hatch? that's not going to help keep the price of the car down on the prime


but there don't look nothing special to repairing the Ioniq, the only real unknown I see is the battery tech and drive electronics test and repair / replacement procedures


but I doubt those will be vastly different to chevy volt / Renault modus / Peugeot ion / Toyota prius etc.


main thing they will be waiting for will be the dimension data for jigs to straighten / check a car after impact and all the wheel / tracking geometry as all


just don't be the first to crash one as you will be the guinea pig for testing the processes and procedures for repair
 

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I still think it's a lot about nothing. Ford trucks are aluminum; I remember when Chevrolet introduced the fiberglass bodied Corvette ... same story. Minor dents and damage .... the entire panel will be replaced; major damage ... the vehicle will be totaled.

I'm more concerned about small dealerships having the skilled technicians to work on complex hybrid systems, and the myriad of electronic sensors, metering device, proximity monitors and display screens. Fortunately, Hyundai has a great warranty, and a good reputation for quality control. Let's just hope that quality extends to the Ioniq.
 

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I'm really not too concerned about body damages anyway. "Don't get into an accident with your Ioniq" lol, I don't think people typically go searching for them. But @Stirfelt just explained my thoughts perfectly. The technical things are what I'm worried about, not body damages.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm an electronic guy and feel comfortable with electronic systems (if I can get the schematics) so I hope that the service manual will be very detailed with electrical and electronic schematics. Honda is very good in that respect. I'm sure the body guys want detailed info too.
 

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Baking the paint.

Reading between the lines in the Hyundai manual provided by Bluecar1, the
problem with repairs seems to be baking the paint on in a body shop. Excess heat KILLS lithium ion cells. Remember certain paints need to be baked for hours. The manual says "refer to Hyundai dealer". Perhaps they have heat shields cooling for the battery. There is an air inlet for the battery in the front of the back seat on the all electric. ( see user manual). Perhaps they attach a cooling fan here while in baking booth. I know dealers want to make as much money out of us as possible, but they also know heir own cars better than everyone else. If you want to see how bad heat is to a lithium ion battery, see Professor Jeff Dahn video on YouTube at 16 mins onwards. The video is called " why do lithium ion batteries fail? and how to improve the situation". Sorry, I don't know how to provide a link.
 

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I don't think the relatively low temperatures in baking stage of the paint booths would represent a issue for the battery pack, if it was I think they would have the open of removing the battery


I think the initial comments re relating the use of high strength steel and aluminium and the issues of replacing and painting, and also the specialist kit required to analyse and repair any potential damage to the drivetrain etc.as at the time there was little information available about the car
 

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Baking The Paint - Part 2.

I have done a bit of research in the nlast couple of weeks, and I now feel even more that the heat PAINT BOOTHS is likely to have real bad effects on Lithium-ion batteries. Body panels are bought in. They may be expensice, but to have to replace a battery because excess heat damage will make body repairs a problem.


One site on paint booth temperatures says:-


Sealants and mastics 150 C/302 F for 20 mins
Primers 180 C/356 F for 30 mins
Base Coat 125 C/260F for 30 - 40 mins
Clear coat 180 C/356F for 30 mins
Quite Zone (cool down)30 - 40C/86 - 104 F.


My own knowledge of batteries over 40 years, and BatteryUniversity.com article BU-808, tells me that Lithium-ion batteries "should not dwell beyond 30 C/86 F".


These baking temperatures are far in excess. It appears that lack of knowledge about battery vehicles being repaired/painted could cost the owner big time - but not for a few months when the battery will not give its normal range, At 5000, 6000, 7000 or 8000 pounds/euros/dollars to replace, it will not be a joke.
 

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The body panels will be taken to bake separately and if the panel is on somewhere that isn't, I'm sure they can use heat lamps opposed to a complete oven.

That being said, I'm sure Hyundai has figured this would be an issue. These are variables that occur all the time so they're not going to let it damage the battery like that. There has to be a method for heat shielding and cooling in circumstances that requires it. There are places where the outside temperature is over 30 degrees celcius, what happens then when you combine it with usage ?!
 

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plan B would be remove the battery pack temporary, they should have the relevant instructions to do it safely if they are an approved repairer,


the actual accident repair centre would have to disconnect or remove the HV battery for any welding or engine work, then they could trailer it to the paint shop in safety
 

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Hi. I have posted my thoughts about "body repairs could be a problem" because I agree with Jay who started the thread.


Looking at the HYUNDAI Ioniq user manual on the forum, page H81 Paragraph 1 - other precautions for electric vehicles, it says - "heat treatments can reduce the performance of the high voltage battery." Refer to HYUNDAI dealer. Presumably a HYUNDAI dealer will know to take this into account. Insulating blocks/blankets? Or more likely, looking at page H5 of the manual showing 3 vents and a fan on the main battery, connecting a duct to the battery and a software option to turn the fan on to keep it cool seems sensible.


Just another problem that could come up during repairs, and here is another. Looking at the Ioniq user manual on page H80, it shows how to tow an Ioniq - and how not to. If a tow truck operator is not knowledgeable enough he may tow the car with the front wheels on the ground. The front wheels will then drive the gearbox and the gearbox will drive the electric motor. The electric motor will then act as a generator and any resulting voltage generated could damage the control box etc etc. And who is paying for that?


Just another possible "Repairs Problem".


I am just trying to agree with Jay's idea of repair problems, particularly for repairers who lack knowledge on these new technologies. Don't get me wrong. I love the new Ioniq and will be buying one when cash becomes available in January after my house sale goes through.
 

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memories of when alternators replaced dynamos back I the 70's all over again


the number of alternator killed by welding without disconnecting batteries :(


hopefully repair shops are a bit more tech savvy these days, and the issues of heat and the battery should be similar to a prius which have been in paint and repair shops for a number of years


I understand where your coming from, but I think most places repairing these should be in the know so minimal risk


biggest risk would be if you bought a Cat C car rebuilt by a back street outfit looking to cut corners to make more profit, they may not have access to the relevant knowledge
 
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