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Background for non-US members:
Electrify America is a division/owned by Volkswagen America. As part of the Diesel Emission scandal of several years ago; they agreed/were ordered to spend a reported $2 Billion over several years on promoting Electric Vehicles. Part of that has been to spend several Hundred Million Dollars building a high speed Charging network. They have a Tesla super charger like network for the non-Tesla owners. They have about 400+ stations currently on line and will be expanding more later. The stations consist of 4-12 chargers with a mix of 150/350kWh CCS/50kWh Chademo dispensers. Their overall plan is to have a station about every 70 miles along the Interstate highway system. As part of evaluating charging options prior and after leasing my Ioniq EV I did research on Electrify America as well as others. My opinion and experience of their APP, Web Site, and in person call to customer service were the were a 5 star outfit in all respects.
They have several pricing plans including Pay at the pump with charge card. I opted for the middle package called Pass, which gives app access to the charger and has the credit card on file with Charge $10 whenever balance falls below $5.
Sounds great so far and I was assuming they would be my first choice to refill on monthly trips from Rural America to the Big City. During my first such trip since owning the EV I planned on checking out 3 DC Fast Charge vendors, as well as 3 Level 2 free charges slightly off the beaten path that may come in handy at some future time.
EA Charging station was located in a Walmart Parking lot with lots of options for restroom, fast food, etc around. By the terms of my Pass account I was expecting charge to be the $1 session fee, and $.21/min for up to 75kWh initial charge rate. So I was expecting $3-4 for my planned 10 min evaluation test charge. What I got was charged the 125kWh rate of $.58/min costing around $9 for about 9 Kw in about 12 minutes. It kicked my initial $10 balance below the $5 minimum, so my total credit card charge for this trial was $20. I don't doubt I was informed of the charge rate cost before I started but due to the display being difficult to read in the afternoon sun as well as trying to learn the system operation it didn't register until I completed and reviewed the receipt. The receipt clearly showed the maximum charge rate was 65kWh with most of the charge around 40 kWh well below the 75kWh threshold for next pricing level.
I inquired with Customer Service twice over several days and received a professional read the FAQ script from agents with a excellent attitude. Their standard explanation was during the start up handshake my IONIQ EV "SECRETLY" told the charger it wanted 82kWh, pushing the rate to the 125kWh price. Never mind they never provided the rate they charged for. Customer Service Rep and Supervisor refused to make any concession/adjustment to this transaction; told me plainly several times it was not a system glitch, I would always be charged this rate at their station; and if I didn't like it to talk to Hyundai.
I find it highly unlikely that in the future I would ever have a situation where I would be willing to pay $1/kWh to charge when there are other DC fast chargers nearby for a third of their cost.

What I CAN'T COMPREHEND is what appears to be a otherwise First Class/ 5 star vendor would rather have rows of empty chargers than satisfied repeat customers. Even though my other than pricing for this test charge experience was great; I will mentioned the rating on various rating sources is low due to malfunctioning chargers, card readers, and other technical issues.

I contacted Hyundai Customer Service by email to inquire about maximum/recommended charge rates ; after a week I received a non-response of my Preferred Service Dealer would be the best source to answer my questions. I inquired from my selling dealer salesperson via text, (what I was told is the preferred contact method), and have not received a response in a week.

I wonder if one of the members here that has experience and manuals with charging info can verify documented Maximum DC Fast Charging Level and if Electrify America's claim of 82kWh is true. If it is can it be adjusted via the dealer service interface. Based on what I read the 65kWh max I got sounds a lot more likely as the Max than 82kWh.
 

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Yeah, just use the 50kW EA charging stations. Otherwise you will get ripped off. Cheaper to drive an ICE vehicle than those... Use Plugshare to plan your trips and where to charge.
 

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Wow, what a bunch of a***holes. Either their equipment is not calibrated properly, or they deliberately lied to you. The Ioniq can take a maximum charge rate of 69 kW, but this is peak power. The average is 65 kW. Do you have the equivalent of trading standards in the US like we do in the UK, because I think you have a good case to claim compensation for fraudulent trading.
 

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EA is exploiting the fact that most EV charging logic misreports max charging rate as it was not utilized by anyone. So they figured it is great way to overcharge unaware customers based on this settings that they could not possibly change by themselves. The proper/smart response for Hyundai would be to allow user to set max charge current in the UI settings. There is no other way around it at the moment, just not to use EA chargers > 50kW. Of course it may be just EA fake to claim your car is advertising high charge rates, and they just hardcoded those in their network to specific make/model to overcharge other EV, but VW ones and partner ones.
Quote: "DC Fast pricing is determined by charger location and rate of charge your vehicle communicates to the charger, together with the maximum charging capability of the charger, as well as membership status. Pre-tax pricing displayed on the charger at the time payment is requested represents the per-minute price for the entire charging session. The actual speed of charge may vary."

I could not find any CSS Fast Charging specs to figure out what is being used to determine this so "important" value. without it it would not be possible to contact Hyundai to push it through.
 

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According to the US manual it can take 100Kw charger and charge in 23 Min to 80% (works out to 58 kWh) and 50KW in 30 mins at 80% (45KWh). I am sure the 68 number seems right to me. The car does not have any fast charge limiters or adjustability that I know of It takes all you can give when hooked to DC. My last EVGo fast charge was attached. 328V and 102A=33.5 KW/Hr and averaged out to $0.61/kWh. Unacceptable costs in my opinion . Welcome to electric car ownership. I love charging at home! it must be VW getting some of their losses back.
 

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Sorry guys, I see no logic in paying More, wasting time charging at some mall/plaza - basically force feeding with junk food. Do you really have so much idle time at your hands to loiter around just to charge stupid car???
If you do not have facility to charge it (home, place of work) don't by EV vehicle.
 

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Sorry guys, I see no logic in paying More, wasting time charging at some mall/plaza - basically force feeding with junk food. Do you really have so much idle time at your hands to loiter around just to charge stupid car???
If you do not have facility to charge it (home, place of work) don't by EV vehicle.
I think the users are referring to 50kWh/100kWh fast charging facility and cost during long distance drive, not really related to charging at home.
 

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Previously discussed here...

 

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Sorry guys, I see no logic in paying More, wasting time charging at some mall/plaza - basically force feeding with junk food. Do you really have so much idle time at your hands to loiter around just to charge stupid car???
If you do not have facility to charge it (home, place of work) don't by EV vehicle.
There are about 7.7 Billion people on this planet. Imagine that each one of us does a variety of things for a variety of reasons. For example, some of us "charge stupid car", others spend their time reading other people's posts and telling them what to buy or not to buy, what to eat or not to eat, how to spend or not spend their time. Introspection is not a good way to understand others. An open mind and good will will work better. Thank you so much for your unsolicited advice! I will make sure to ask you next time I can't figure out for myself what to do.
 

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There are about 7.7 Billion people on this planet. Imagine that each one of us does a variety of things for a variety of reasons. For example, some of us "charge stupid car", others spend their time reading other people's posts and telling them what to buy or not to buy, what to eat or not to eat, how to spend or not spend their time. Introspection is not a good way to understand others. An open mind and good will will work better. Thank you so much for your unsolicited advice! I will make sure to ask you next time I can't figure out for myself what to do.
About the advice of what to eat and what not to eat, don't feed the troll!
 

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I found bunch of free L2 chargers near me at the multi national corporation headquarter office. It is known location, but it is in secluded and remote place, so not much to do for extended time, so nobody ever charge EV there, except may be a few employees during work days. I bought electric scooter and simply scoot back home while my car is charging there and then scoot back when it almost complete. I could have done it with another ICE car and my spouse giving me rides, but it defeats the remote charging as you waste other people time and gas! One day I just walked back home and then back to charger, but it is 3.5 miles each way and some roads are not safe for walking in suburbs where I live. The safest route would be 4.5 miles, a bit of a stretch for 9 miles round trip on foot.

I wanted electric scooter for a while, but did not see any use for me before. Now, it has a purpose: I could go 500 miles on $1, I do not bother anyone and my charging is absolutely free and easy. It is not new trend, many EV owners use scooters as the last mile transport, because of they prefer to park at the places with charger and it is usually a few miles away from the destination, so scooter solves this dilemma. Of course, for this you need very portable scooter like this one: Glion Dolly Foldable Lightweight Adult Electric Scooter w/ Premium Li-Ion Battery

Folks who choose to travel long distance on EV have no choice, but to deal with fast chargers rip off. BTW, Tesla is a bit better in pricing, but twice expensive vs. home and nothing can compare vs. free charging. I would use EV for long distance only if there is free DC chargers on my way.
 

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Most of the DC fast charge (DCFC) charge network appears to be a terrible rip-off of EV drivers. I think most of us would be okay paying a bit more than home charging, but not 10x+! The day after I got my Ioniq EV I drove over to a EA DCFC about 20 miles from my home, just to try it out. Granted, I knew taper was an issue, because I was around 80%. There were four units, and three were out of service, one not even powered up. I took on just over 4 kWhrs of energy in 10 minutes for $4.71! That is total nonsense, where we pay .15 / kWhr locally (so 4 kWhr is about 60 cents at home (nothing for me, because I paid for a lifetime of power with solar panels, not really a savings, just paying ahead with the high price of solar, still fun).

Thank you for reminding me to cancel my $4 monthly payment to EA.

I sold my Chevy Bolt realizing not only the charging time inconvenience, but the very high cost of highway DCFC (not a big deal, but DCFC is not "Level 3", which by automotive / electrical standards something else). My traveling car is a Honda Clarity PHEV. I really wanted more BEV time too, so picked up a 2019 Ioniq EV with the end of year lease deal and double veterans day discount here in the US. Only have 150 miles or so on it so far, what a joy to drive "local", it is a wonderful car.

I called EA based on this post, and they said they are aware of the "handshake" issue with Ioniq putting it up to the next tier. But, there is a huge difference between a friendly rep. and how the company treats us. I bet the first VWs will come with some period of free EA, just like Nissan was doing for a while with the LEAF.

Considering the whole concept was to encourage green driving, IMHO the Electrify America company is a pretty disgusting company, charging rates as high or higher than gas (around $2.60/gallon here now).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I called EA based on this post, and they said they are aware of the "handshake" issue with Ioniq putting it up to the next tier. But, there is a huge difference between a friendly rep. and how the company treats us.
WOW! Thanks for the help; that is some level of improvement over a few weeks. I was assured by 2 reps and a CS manager; that there were no technical issues with the IONIQ handshake. "They were charging based on what the IONIQ "SECRETLY" told the charger to provide the fastest level of charge and highest level of Customer Service to me.
 

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So this is clearly inaccurate, but I submitted a request via Hyundai's site asking what the kW acceptance rate is for the 2019 Ioniq BEV, and this is what they said.
Dear [my name]:

Thank you for contacting Hyundai Motor America.

We always appreciate the opportunity to hear from our customers, and we are happy to have you be a part of the hyundai family. We would be happy to provide the information requested.

Per our records, the 2019 Ioniq EV has a max charging capacity of 50kW, which is considered fast charging. Additionally, any 7.4 kW charging station works best for your vehicle.

When contacting us regarding this email, please reference your case number [00000000]. We look forward to assisting you further.

Thank you for contacting Hyundai Motor America and being a valued member of our Hyundai Family.
I followed up asking for technical info. They replied back to look at the owners manual on page H12 or contact my dealership.

As everyone here knows, page H12 specifies that a 50kW takes approx 30min to 80%, and a 100kW approx 23min to 80%. Not super useful, and I assume my dealership won't have much, considering no one has posted anything useful from TechInfo.
 

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I've now gone around with Hyundai support a few times and they keep quoting the manual and saying to ask EA... Hyundai support sucks.
Thank you for contacting Hyundai Motor America.

We always appreciate the opportunity to hear from our customers. We are sorry to hear of your confusion regarding the maximum KW that the 2019 Ioniq EV can accept from a DC fast charger. However, we are happy to provide information regarding this concern.

Utilizing the owner's manual we have determined that your Ioniq EV can accept up to 100 kw using a DC fast charger. Taking approximately 23 minutes to charge to 80%.

We hope this information is helpful to you.
Thank you for contacting Hyundai Motor America. We are sorry for the miscommunication on your inquiry of the maximum kW accepted from a DC fast charger for your 2019 Ioniq EV. However, we appreciate the opportunity to assist you.

We have forwarded your case to the appropriate personnel for additional research. We will contact you when an update to your case is available and look forward to assisting you further. Your patience is appreciated.
Thank you for your patience with Hyundai Motor America. We are pleased to inform you that an update to your case is ready.

Customer satisfaction is one of Hyundai's top priorities. We have completed the research for your inquiry on the maximum kW accepted from a DC charger, for your Ioniq EV. We recommend to contact Electrify America for further assistance.
Thank you for your patience with Hyundai Motor America. We are pleased to inform you that an update to your case is ready.

Customer satisfaction is one of Hyundai's top priorities. We have completed the research for your inquiry on the maximum kW accepted from a DC charger for your Ioniq EV.

Ioniq Electric vehicles have a 28-kWh lithium-ion battery pack that is located beneath the rear seat. It travels 124 miles on a charge. Using a Level 3 DC fast charger, the Ioniq can reach 80 percent of its charge within 23 minutes. A full recharge from a 240-volt charger takes about 4.5 hours.

We recommend to contact Electrify America for further assistance.
 

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"Using a Level 3 DC fast charger, the Ioniq can reach 80 percent of its charge within 23 minutes."

We have DCFC (DC fast charge), Our options are L1, L2, and DCFC.

Level 3 (link to Weber Automotive YouTube video on L3) is something entirely different. I can understand why many EV drivers don't know this (because the L3 term certainly seems intuitive as the next step faster than 220V-240V L2), but if the manufacture does not know that DCFC is not level 3, well that says a lot about the tech person writing the reply.

OTOH, if enough people think that DCFC is L3, well then, maybe it just is :)
 

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Good video, thanks for the link.

That said, I think your last statement is true. DCFC is a synonym for L3 because that is what many sources call it.

Regardless of the terms, it all brings me back to wanting EA to charge by actual acceptance rate.
 
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