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Hi all,
I am brand new to this forum and in the process (by Dec) of moving from my BMW 540i to an Ioniq 5 AWD (Ultimate/Tech/Eco). I was spurred on by the savings but also the move to EVs is something our family has wanted to do for a while and the style of the Ioniq 5 swayed me.

My question is regarding charging. My wife is picking up a VW ID.3 this week and I was wondering what the best charger/company/tariff people would recommend supporting both cars. We do not do tons of miles (each of us around 8K miles per year, and a mix of motorway and town/village driving).

We have a public BP Pulse charging station near us (400m), but looking for support on good companies/grants/tariffs worth also looking at.

Many Thanks

TameAutumn
 

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I'm in a similar position but have recently ordered a Hypervolt Home Charger - basically because I liked the look of it & its new, having only been launched this year
ZapMap have made an informative page which shows all the available UK Home Chargers >> https://www.zap-map.com/charge-points/charging-home/

I'm with Octopus Energy who will be fitting a new smart meter next month.
This will enable us to charge @ 5p/Kwh between 00:30 & 04:30
4 hrs x 7Kw x 0.05p = £1.40 = around 80-100 miles range (I hope) :)
 

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Most of your questions will be answered on the "Home charger decision" thread on this forum. Your dealer for both the VW and Hyundai will probably have a preferred charger supplier and may be offering a deal including installation. Hyundai recommend PodPoint. If you have solar panels at home you might want to consider a Zappi.
In our case we have a PodPoint. If you go on the website there should be a list of approved installers. We went with a local electrician from that list. We have had the charger for 18 months with no problems.
There is a .gov web page that lists all currently approved chargers that are eligible for a grant. All approved chargers need to be "smart". This means the charger can be shut down remotely if there is a risk of the supply grid being overloaded.

Several electricity suppliers offer tariffs for EV owners. I believe OVO energy is a popular choice. I will be hunting around after our current 2 year fixed deal ends in January.
 

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Caution: if you are a 2 EV car family, will you have 2 chargers or only 1? If its just 1 the cars will be competing for the charger to take advantage of the cheap night rate with (e.g. GO) and you won't want to get up at 3pm to swap!
If you have 2 chargers each should have a dedicated circuit to the distribution unit of 30A, but you could program each car to take advantage of the cheap rate.
I anticipate that the P45 will add just under 28kWh on Go cheap rate so roughly 90-100 miles.
 

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Some home chargers are capable of sharing a single supply circuit, if that is a requirement.
Agreed, however it gets complicated in the UK. For example we have a main distribution box in our house from which a cable runs into our garage to a smaller distribution box to provide power for lights, sockets, and EV chargers. We have 2 EV chargers, a freezer, tumble dryer and other sockets and lights all all running from one supply cable. If we ran the 2 EV chargers at the same time along with the other minor stuff the circuit would overload.
We could if necessary control when each charger runs via the car app/menus so they don't both run at the same time, but for us its just easier to charge alternate nights.
 

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Caution: if you are a 2 EV car family, will you have 2 chargers or only 1? If its just 1 the cars will be competing for the charger to take advantage of the cheap night rate with (e.g. GO) and you won't want to get up at 3pm to swap!
If you have 2 chargers each should have a dedicated circuit to the distribution unit of 30A, but you could program each car to take advantage of the cheap rate.
I anticipate that the P45 will add just under 28kWh on Go cheap rate so roughly 90-100 miles.
The one thing that limits the amount of power that can be drawn from a domestic supply is the supply fuse inserted before the supply meter. It doesn't matter how many chargers you have as long as the total house current drawn at any one time doesn't exceed the supply fuse rating.
I actually have 2 EV chargers, a PodPoint dumb charger which was installed in 2015 and a "smart" charger that I got for free as I was part of a trial for another manufacturer's new development.
My experience is that I never use the "smart" charger as I find it more convient to use the PodPoint and let the car do all the scheduling etc. After all all the charging electronics are in the car and the wall unit is really just a fancy switch.
 

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The one thing that limits the amount of power that can be drawn from a domestic supply is the supply fuse inserted before the supply meter. It doesn't matter how many chargers you have as long as the total house current drawn at any one time doesn't exceed the supply fuse rating.
Thats only correct up to a point. I agree that the overall total draw cannot exceed the supply fuse, however if any given circuit draw from the distribution unit exceeds the max rating of the breaker/fuse on that circuit it will (could) trip the circuit.
 

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Be wary of smart chargers. I'm sure the government will find a way in the future of using them to maybe a higher rate of vat or some other means of recouping some of there fuel duty losses
 

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There's no reason to spend a lot on a charger. Your car is the charger TBH. It has to convert your AC current into DC.
All you need is an 240V plug and a cord that has a J1772 connection.

I got something like this, and it works perfectly.

You're still only going to get 30A and 7kw/h no matter how advanced the "charger" is.
 

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.....You're still only going to get 30A and 7kw/h no matter how advanced the "charger" is.
I read that the Ioniq 5 can accept up to 11kW through its J1772 port, so 240V and a 60-amp breaker (48A max charge rate) would be optimal.
 

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11kW will be what it charges at on a 3-phase supply. Not many UK homes have this, and it's expensive to retrofit. If charging 2 EVs at the same time, current draw will be high as mentioned (my Ioniq 38 draws 31.5A on my 7kW EVSE), and the house fuses may be 60A, or 100A, or maybe ?80A? and you can't tell from just looking at the fuse holder. Lots of discussion about all this stuff in Speakev.com, also discussion about 3-phase, Earth rods & safety, EVSE appearance, cable lengths, etc. This kind of question is often discussed over there, and there are very knowledgeable experts there.
 

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While 11 kW sounds attractive, you need to consider several factors. Bigger is not always better.

First are you on a program that has demand charges. If so, this may take you into a much higher rate.

Second do you need or think you will need this level of current in the future.

Third, can you service box handle this level of current (48Amps) safely. If you have to upgrade you service box that can be very expensive. In the US I have seen cost of over $2,000. I have no idea what the cost would be in the UK.

Fourth is more of a caution. Be sure the connections used are of high quality. Do not use a plug in for this high of a current. The heat generation can be very high is the connection is not great. I have a 40 amp circuit with a 32 amp EVSE, but I have programmed the EVSE to only 24 amps to reduce the heating.
 

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I'm in a similar position but have recently ordered a Hypervolt Home Charger - basically because I liked the look of it & its new, having only been launched this year
ZapMap have made an informative page which shows all the available UK Home Chargers >> https://www.zap-map.com/charge-points/charging-home/

I'm with Octopus Energy who will be fitting a new smart meter next month.
This will enable us to charge @ 5p/Kwh between 00:30 & 04:30
4 hrs x 7Kw x 0.05p = £1.40 = around 80-100 miles range (I hope) :)
Hi @Restyler , just as an FYI, when you get your smart meter and move to Octopus Go, if you contact them and ask them to move on to Octopus Go Faster it will change the the off peak time to 8.30pm to 1.30am at 5.5p/kWh. You get the extra hour of off peak at only 0.5p more which makes most sense, and because the off peak time is while you're still awake you can run high power appliances like washing machines and tumble dryers making it even cheaper!
 

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Thats only correct up to a point. I agree that the overall total draw cannot exceed the supply fuse, however if any given circuit draw from the distribution unit exceeds the max rating of the breaker/fuse on that circuit it will (could) trip the circuit.
Sure that would be the case if you had both chargers on the same circuit and hence breaker. Note also that domestic breakers trip at 3 - 5 times the current rating to prevent large inrush currents causing trips. My installation has a separate 32 amp circuit with breaker for each circuit to each respective 7kWh EVSE so I could in theory draw 64 amps from the supply plus current from all the other domestic equipment. My main electrical fuse is rated 60/80 amps (not sure why its a range). So because I only use one EVSE at a time I don't feel I have a problem.
UK Power Networks who own the supply fuse will upgrade the fuse rating, assuming supply cable is capable, if required but note the electricity meter also has to be capable of handling the extra load as well.
 

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Sure that would be the case if you had both chargers on the same circuit and hence breaker.
That's my situation, i have a 30A line into my garage and both chargers are on this circuit. In you case the constraint is, as you say, the supply fuse.
 

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I had a tethered Podpoint charger installed a couple of weeks ago and cost £529 after the Government OZEV grant of £350 which Podpoint sorted out for me, I didn't see the need to pay extra for one that you could do loads of different things as the Bluelink app does all that via the car
 
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