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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a rough understanding of the PHEV for daily commutes of lower speeds and short distances.

My question stems from longer range at higher speeds. Is there a benefit to buying PHEV for long range driving? I know a conventional hybrid uses the gasoline motor and regen braking to charge the battery for uses that the car will determine it can get away without the ICE engine. Since the PHEV uses a battery that charges through regen braking and a plug. Does the electric motor shut off once the car hits a higher speed? So essentially you are just driving a gasoline car?
 

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this is something we have little information about, until the plugins hit the road in a members hands, in theory the bigger electric motor should mean it will be able to run on electric at more than 75mph of the hybrid

but as with the EV higher speeds = more wind resistance = quicker use of the battery power

none of the Ioniq model are really designed for sustained high speeds if you want to maintain good economy
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
@bluecar1 Thank you for the reply. I think the question doesn't just single out the Ioniq it's actually a general question about all plug in hybrids. I think the best way to ask is to create a mock situation.

Lets say I am driving 119km. I understand the lower speeds will keep me in EV mode from my home to the on ramp for the highway/freeway/motorway. Lets say the EV motor can handle 80km/h before the ICE kicks in. At higher speeds around lets say 110km/h, does the ICE and EV motor work in unison or does the EV motor shut off entirely making the car essentially a ICE car until I exit the highway and the car reaches a speed that the ICE can then shut off and only the EV can run.

My reason for asking such an odd question is my wife and I will need new vehicles and we can get away with the BEV for most uses, though 1 to 2 times a month we travel over 100kms to see family. So we are having trouble deciding if we should have one BEV and one ICE vehicle, or an ICE and PHEV, or PHEV and BEV.
 

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Your assumption is that the PHEV can only drive in EV below 80 km/h. I wonder whether that's true. Your question depends just on that. If the car allows driving in EV up to 110 km/h you will have an advantage. Is there already an owner's manual available for the PHEV?

I think I have read that the PHEV has an EV mode in which the car will never let the ICE kick in. But maybe somebody can confirm that.
 

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Some publications should try long term tests of these since that will go a long way in seeing what consumers will get. Plus those journalists will be more analytical about the entire process compared to the average owner.

Going to be a while before we get any real solid data.
 

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As I work in the power and storage space, the answer of PHEV battery usage is it depends on the Propulsion setup and it depends on the Battery Management System metrics. Some PHEV's are 100% electric drive with a gasoline-powered generator (range extender to charge the battery while driving, such as the BMW i3 REx). Some PHEV's have a parallel electric/ICE drive, which can propel the wheels via all pistons, all electric or blend of pistons and electric, such as the Ioniq PHEV. Overlaying the propulsion set-up is a BMS chip with many parameters which are set by the OEM at the factory following prototype testing phase. BMS determines for example that once the lithium battery charge is depleted to a set level (say, 25% charge remaining), the ICE kicks in to start recharging the battery (on an i3) or to start propelling the car (on an Ioniq). Or alternatively, under extreme load (flooring it, driving continuously at autoroute speed, etc), the Ioniq ICE may kick in to add power (even if the battery is fully charged). Generally speaking, PHEV's drive all electric when driving slowly AND when the charge level is sufficient, otherwise the ICE will be helping out the rest of the time.
 

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I believe in the criterion that the battery should stay charged in the usable part of the battery. But for the criterion of driving slowly, that differs for different models and brands. Some do have an EV mode button to keep it in EV (as long as the charge is sufficient).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Generally speaking, PHEV's drive all electric when driving slowly AND when the charge level is sufficient, otherwise the ICE will be helping out the rest of the time.
Okay, I think this response is as close of an answer to my question as possible so far. Thank you @luca riffer
 

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I think the wisest thing to do is just wait for a judgement until you can get more specific information about this characteristic of the Ioniq PHEV. Only that can give an answer on the question whether you can drive it in EV at 110 km/h. For now what we have is just speculation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think the wisest thing to do is just wait for a judgement until you can get more specific information about this characteristic of the Ioniq PHEV. Only that can give an answer on the question whether you can drive it in EV at 110 km/h. For now what we have is just speculation.
In an ideal situation I will try my best to hold out to see what the PHEV is all about. But with the recent track record of the Ioniq release that may not be an option as we will need a new vehicle within 12 months. But I think it's realistic to think that the PHEV will have a large enough battery to run 50km on pure EV at lower speeds or up to a speed of 100km/h and when the car is driving highway, I can see the ICE taking control and the EV only kicking in when the car needs some extra HP to pass other vehicles or needs torque to go up hills, etc. As the car being PHEV I don't think the vehicle will charge the battery through the ICE so it should only have 8kWh that it has to use sparingly. I think the ICE and EV motor running in unison for 100km is not plausible.

I could be completely wrong though. Maybe they will introduce something never seen before that allows the EV motor to run in unison with the ICE the entire drive reducing its fuel usage.
 

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I could be completely wrong though. Maybe they will introduce something never seen before that allows the EV motor to run in unison with the ICE the entire drive reducing its fuel usage.
That's not really new. The first generation Prius Plug In (US model) does that. They call it blended mode.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's not really new. The first generation Prius Plug In (US model) does that. They call it blended mode.
Yes, that is correct but does that not only run for 18kms until the battery can no longer provide power for blended mode?
 

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The first generation Prius Plug In is one of the Plug In Hybrids that can only drive in pure EV for relatively slow speeds: up to 85 km/h.
 

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A larger battery can help mpg, but only up to a point. The Ioniq hybrid has a small advantage over the Prius in that the battery is a bit larger. Long distance in a plug in, that even larger battery is a detriment to mileage because of the significant extra weight you are carrying for every single mile (unless you really want to hit fast chargers frequently on a trip to add 25 EV miles). That is why the mpg rating is lower. It is like always carrying an extra passenger.
 

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The first generation Prius Plug In is one of the Plug In Hybrids that can only drive in pure EV for relatively slow speeds: up to 85 km/h.
By the way, this does not hold for the second generation Prius Plug In (the Prius Prime). This is one of the examples of a PHEV that can drive in pure EV on high speeds (there is a button for EV mode to achieve that). See for more details the PriusChat forum, for example here it is explained:


There's EV Mode, HV Mode and EV Auto mode.

The first one is strictly EV and will behave like the Volt
The second tells the car to operate like a hybrid car (so it may conserve the battery for later use)
The 3rd is new and EV Auto will function like the old PiP. This mode will use battery or gas depending on which is more efficient.

So you could consider the Prius Prime as an alternative option. But there is a good chance that the Ioniq PHEV was designed in a similar manner with a button for pure EV driving also on high speeds.
 
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Yes, that is correct but does that not only run for 18kms until the battery can no longer provide power for blended mode?
I understood from PriusChat that this blended mode works all the time, and especially when the speeds vary a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There's EV Mode, HV Mode and EV Auto mode.

The first one is strictly EV and will behave like the Volt
The second tells the car to operate like a hybrid car (so it may conserve the battery for later use)
The 3rd is new and EV Auto will function like the old PiP. This mode will use battery or gas depending on which is more efficient.

So you could consider the Prius Prime as an alternative option. But there is a good chance that the Ioniq PHEV was designed in a similar manner with a button for pure EV driving also on high speeds.

@Jan Treur Thank you, this response answers my question almost to a "T" I understand we need to wait to see what the PHEV will offer hopefully Hyundai can get some information regarding pricing, rebate incentives and battery range out before the end of 2017. My wife and I have considered the Prius, though the body styling and some of the interior styling is just too over the top for us. The tech in it is great but the design is just not for us. Thank you very much for helping answer my questions on PHEV :)
 

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You are welcome!
I almost bought a Prius Prime. I am also not completely in favor of its design, but for me it looks at least a bit better than the design of the new Prius Hybrid 4. I decided not to buy the Prime when I saw the limited cargo space in it, the expected high price in the Netherlands, and I saw the much better specifications and price of the Ioniq EV. I was convinced immediately when I test drove the Ioniq EV for one hour and bought it the same day, which was one of my best decisions ever.
 
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