Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner
21 - 40 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
602 Posts
Looking at your typical journeys you ought to be OK for range but, knowing the way you say you drive and in the colder weather with battery range being a bit less and you having heating on it might be a bit tight. Should you hit a diversion then it really could be a bit nervy, unless you can charge at work which makes a whole new ball game. Although 65% of my trips are <30 miles I am still mightily relieved I have a PHEV, because I do longer trips including to Ashbourne retail park :D.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TKGDee

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Just chipping in. We changed from an Ioniq HEV to BEV just over 12 months ago. Typical mileage 20kpa. Used daily by wife who works just over 30 miles from home, through city then 60mph main road for bulk of the journey. Our experience - BEV feels faster to accelerate than HEV and typical summer economy >5Miles/KwH and still about 4Miles/KwH in the UK winter. Daily usage just over 60 miles - charged every other night - no concerns whatsoever. Just done three summer staycations - distances from home 220, 280 and 215 (mostly 70 mph motorway) miles respectively. Absolutely no issues whatsoever - one stop for a 45 minute break and recharge in each direction each time. Agree infrastucture an issue so plan stops carefully with backups. We looked at the Ioniq 5 for our next car, but struggle to justify the extra cost, so are planning to go Ioniq BEV again next time.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq Electric Premium SE
Joined
·
25 Posts
I often do UK journeys similar to what you have suggested. I drive at “normal“ motorway speeds, as I always used to In petrol and diesel cars. The combination of “fast“motorway, A roads and some urban mileage gives around 5 m / kWh, which is really good. During winter this reduces to around 4.5 m / kWh which is much better than many rival models. Coupled with home charging at night, this equates to little more than 1p per mile. The power and torque, whilst not in Tesla territory is more than adequate and superior to both the plug in and hybrid models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Sounds like you got the 2020 facelift. The 28kWh fills up in 20-25min or so as it's charging twice as fast.
Not just a face lift - 40% bigger battery and 50% greater range. There is no way the old 28KWH would do 270 miles on one stop. Both the old and new Ioniq have similar charging speeds up to 80%, the fact that the old 80% is much less charge seems somewhat irrelevant since more stops are necessary.
 

·
Registered
2020 Premium Electric
Joined
·
117 Posts
I do a fair bit of motorway driving at 100-110km/h and the overall efficiency is still good. I made a couple of highway trips on Monday at those speeds.

79km at 118Wh/km and 92km at 125Wh/km. Can't complain at that to be honest. To put that into persepective, I'm getting 310-320km on a charge at highway speeds (I'll get about 335km in mixed and stop / start driving).

As for performance. It's not a sports car by any means but pulling away from lights or overtaking, the acceleration is instant. It's a fun little car to drive.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
Not just a face lift - 40% bigger battery and 50% greater range. There is no way the old 28KWH would do 270 miles on one stop. Both the old and new Ioniq have similar charging speeds up to 80%, the fact that the old 80% is much less charge seems somewhat irrelevant since more stops are necessary.
HM... well this is very important to grasp. The older 28kWh is WAY faster to charge. It can do the 1000km challenge under 12hours. The newer 38kWh charges way slower and needs many hours more for the 1000km test.

Ok....

Now, how does this matter? Well... for me it was unthinkable getting the 38kWh as is would cost $10000 more while practically removing the fast charging (remember it's colder here). The 28 always charges with 65kW to 77% Soc and still reasonably fast all the way up. The 38 takes forever, approx double the time for the same kWh. The 28 kills the 38 in my use case. If you daily need the extra range and never DC charges the 38 would make sense. the 38 also charges slower at AC as it needs to condition the pack using ingoing power.

Technical stuff, but very important to understand before buying a car. As the two are so different even looking similar on the outside.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq EV Premium Plus
Joined
·
496 Posts
the 38 also charges slower at AC as it needs to condition the pack using ingoing power.
Can you elaborate on that, please? The "38" has a 7.2 kW AC charger, the "28" has a 6.6 kW AC charger. Unless the "conditioning" (whatever that is?) consumes 600 W or more, the "38" should AC-charge faster than the "28".
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq Electric Premium SE
Joined
·
25 Posts
My 38 charges at 7.2Kw on my A.C. home Zappi charger - fact.
To put the rapid charging argument into what I would call a real world perspective I.e not a 1000 km challenge. During a recent 220 mile trip from North Lincolnshire to Portsmouth (220 miles) I set off with a full charge from home. I stopped at Baldock services (110 miles) on the A1 where I topped up the charge for precisely 22 mins allowing for a coffee and leg stretch. This then got me to my destination with 27% charge left. I might add that this was with normal driving - not crawling along with the lorries or draughting to gain efficiency
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Can you elaborate on that, please? The "38" has a 7.2 kW AC charger, the "28" has a 6.6 kW AC charger. Unless the "conditioning" (whatever that is?) consumes 600 W or more, the "38" should AC-charge faster than the "28".
I think he is referring to the DCFC issues with the 38 kW units. They charge significantly slower than the 28 kWh from what I have read. I do not have a 38 kWh unit so I am unfamiliar with the issue. I think the 38 kWh models will max out at 45 kWh DCFC charging (frequently over 1 hour for a 90% charge) where the 28 kWh takes up to 65 kWh DCFC and is much quicker. Although the range is shorter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,439 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
wow guys thanks for all the replies! This is great.. i'll do some replies individually..
Acceleration seems to be somewhat better than the HEV version, according to the specs. What I like about electric cars is the instant torque. No hesitation, no revving up, no downshifing, it just launches. And it’s silent, too!
I'm reading this a lot. Which is good! I am in no way expecting it to be a sportscar but I would like it to move no less than my current HEV. I think that is a requirement of safe driving to be honest, especially on higher speed roads.

Yes, Ioniq does very well in snow I must say. It's comfortable to drive and even with loads of snow here it went very well.
Does very well in a lake as well 😝 Well not really a lake but I did take it through a quite flooded road once, the water was coming over the bonnet a bit.. And it just swam through with the agility of a dolphin and no damage or leaks 😁 Have also driven it on icy / snowy roads out in the English countryside, it handled well.. but I also think a certain amount of that is knowing how to drive in those conditions.

V4B seems to be the cheapest price over 3 years, but don't take the maintenance with them as their price is very expensive. Hyundai emailed me a few days after signing and offered it for only £4.09 a month extra, although it may be slightly more for an 8000 mile lease (mine is 5000 miles a year but paying the excess miles still costs slightly less than taking the 8000 mile a year lease. Taking the maintenance does also bump up the excess mileage from 10.8p to 12.6p a mile inc VAT).
This will be my 3rd Ioniq lease and I found out quick how much of a scam their pricing models are. I didn't take maintenance out the first time and regretted it when I had to come up with the money up front for tyres, servicing, fluids etc. I took maintenance out this time via Hyundai and I think its the same price you've been offered. The extra mileage is a joke. Yes, it is cheaper to go over and pay for the additional miles than to take it out on the contract. Makes no sense, but there it is. Worse, this lease, due to covid, I have done half the miles I've been paying for and of course Hyundai won't adjust my lease payments even though I'm returning it with 20k more miles than I'm meant to. Not a mistake I will make again. GAP insurance is the other thing I have been told I must have with a lease car but this is expensive and I have never had to use it. Is that something you pay for?

Looking at your typical journeys you ought to be OK for range but, knowing the way you say you drive and in the colder weather with battery range being a bit less and you having heating on it might be a bit tight. Should you hit a diversion then it really could be a bit nervy, unless you can charge at work which makes a whole new ball game. Although 65% of my trips are <30 miles I am still mightily relieved I have a PHEV, because I do longer trips including to Ashbourne retail park :D.
I don't know what you mean! 😇
I do have one or 2 charging points at work but they are usually taken up so not very feasible. I do think on an 80mile round trip i'd have to be very naughty to use an entire charge. I'm not taking it around the race tracks, I just want to know it will move when I need it to and not leave me on the side of the road with no charge left 😄
If I do go on any longer road trips, there are always charging points at the services that I have been to anyway.

As for performance. It's not a sports car by any means but pulling away from lights or overtaking, the acceleration is instant. It's a fun little car to drive.
That's what I love about my little HEV now! It is a fun little car to drive! I'm so happy to hear I would get more of this nippyness with the EV 😁
 

·
Registered
Red 2019 Ioniq 38 Premium EV
Joined
·
345 Posts
The 38 kWh EV's an excellent car on the A roads. Today did about 100 miles on A34 dual, had plenty of battery so for once I hammered it up the road aiming for genuine 70 mph speed, but occasionally going a bit quicker when needed to avoid traffic blockages. Had no problems overtaking, even up the few steepish hills. It's well able to keep up with the fast stuff!
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq EV Premium Plus
Joined
·
496 Posts
HM... well this is very important to grasp. The older 28kWh is WAY faster to charge. It can do the 1000km challenge under 12hours. The newer 38kWh charges way slower and needs many hours more for the 1000km test.
Bjørn Nyland's 1000 km challenges are an extreme use case that most of us will rarely - if ever - encounter. If you do such long and hurried trips with any regularity, I would neither recommend the 28 nor the 38 kWh Ioniq. You would need something with both faster charging and a bigger battery, perhaps the new Ioniq 5.

The longest car trip I have ever made in my entire life was two years ago when a friend and I drove from Sydney to Brisbane in Australia, a distance of 900 km. We did that over a course of three days, with two overnight stays on the way. The car was petrol powered, but any of the Ioniq EVs would have easily been able to do the same trip. Charging speed wouldn't have been an issue. Just a brief top-up at a fast charger each day, and slow AC charging during the nights.

I'm sure that you're happy with your 28 kWh Ioniq, and that it fits your usage pattern. But please don't judge everyone else's needs by your own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
This lease, due to covid, I have done half the miles I've been paying for and of course Hyundai won't adjust my lease payments even though I'm returning it with 20k more miles than I'm meant to. Not a mistake I will make again. GAP insurance is the other thing I have been told I must have with a lease car but this is expensive and I have never had to use it. Is that something you pay for?
Did you mean returning it with less miles? You said you'd done half the miles you'd pay for.
This is par for the course with all leases; you always pay for more miles but don't get refunded for less.
Gap insurance is a personal choice. I don't think I'll bother this time as I was told the leasing company and insurance company normally settle the amount and the person leasing isn't asked to pay extra. However, if you put down a large deposit it may be worth it as this can be refunded by the gap insurance.

As for the discussions about 28kwh vs 38kwh rapid charging, I really think it's a pointless argument. If you really want to drive huge distances with very short stops then, as someone said, get a car with a bigger battery and faster DC charging. However, for normal people, a 300 mile journey for example, will be achievable by both cars, possibly in a similar time. The 28kwh will need maybe a couple of stops which will be marginally shorter. The 38kwh may need only one stop of longer duration, and that may actually suit some people better, as it allows more time for food or a leg stretch.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
If you do such long and hurried trips with any regularity, I would neither recommend the 28 nor the 38 kWh Ioniq. You would need something with both faster charging and a bigger battery, perhaps the new Ioniq 5.
Yes, Obvious! Still it sort of translates to charging while shopping. If you can do the full 50kW to 85% you gain more than if getting like 35kW at best tapering with higher SoC. This winter a Taxi driver in a 38 needed 45min to go 60-80% SoC at a 50kW DC charger.... I saw it while doing my errands... makes no sense. My car would have gone 0-94% in way less then that.

The longest car trip I have ever made in my entire life was two years ago when a friend and I drove from Sydney to Brisbane in Australia, a distance of 900 km. We did that over a course of three days, with two overnight stays on the way. The car was petrol powered, but any of the Ioniq EVs would have easily been able to do the same trip. Charging speed wouldn't have been an issue. Just a brief top-up at a fast charger each day, and slow AC charging during the nights.
Agreed for that sort of trip any car would do. The 38 could sort of do it only on AC during nights.

I'm sure that you're happy with your 28 kWh Ioniq, and that it fits your usage pattern. But please don't judge everyone else's needs by your own.
I'm very open with that I only talk of my experiences. And that it's important to realize the differences. It's loads of money going in a car, knowing what it really can do is key for me at least. It's very differend judging vs informing. Back in the days there were even people defending the 41kWh Zoe with only 22kW AC charging as a perfect road trip car as it was soooo enjoyable to stay for 3 hours wathing birds while charging. Ok, fine for some that would be ok but just don't call it fast charging.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
Can you elaborate on that, please? The "38" has a 7.2 kW AC charger, the "28" has a 6.6 kW AC charger. Unless the "conditioning" (whatever that is?) consumes 600 W or more, the "38" should AC-charge faster than the "28".
Search the forums. It's been asked many times wht the car charges so slow even though everything is setup correctly. Having a 7.2kW post getting only like 5kW to the battery. Seems warming the pack uses lot's of power too. Not a problem really if you got a 32A fuse but if limited to 16A it might be a problem?!
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
My 38 charges at 7.2Kw on my A.C. home Zappi charger - fact.
To put the rapid charging argument into what I would call a real world perspective I.e not a 1000 km challenge. During a recent 220 mile trip from North Lincolnshire to Portsmouth (220 miles) I set off with a full charge from home. I stopped at Baldock services (110 miles) on the A1 where I topped up the charge for precisely 22 mins allowing for a coffee and leg stretch. This then got me to my destination with 27% charge left. I might add that this was with normal driving - not crawling along with the lorries or draughting to gain efficiency
Yes, it's obvious you can go 220miles with a 22min stop on a car having an almost 200mile rated range. Point is not that. Point is the older car charges twice as fast on DC.

It's not calling the other useless, it's only informing as it does matter depending on your daily drives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,439 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Did you mean returning it with less miles? You said you'd done half the miles you'd pay for.
Yes and I know that this will normally happen with leases but I had paid for over twice the normal contract mileage so I thought some discretion could have been applied and my contract adjusted as I will not make up those miles now. Nevermind.. know better for next time.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq EV Premium Plus
Joined
·
496 Posts
Search the forums. It's been asked many times wht the car charges so slow even though everything is setup correctly. Having a 7.2kW post getting only like 5kW to the battery. Seems warming the pack uses lot's of power too. Not a problem really if you got a 32A fuse but if limited to 16A it might be a problem?!
I do get 7.2 kW every time, all the time, at AC-chargers that have been set up for it. If you get less, the problem lies somewhere else, not with the car.

Many public chargers have been configured to deliver less, in particular free chargers at shopping malls. If the charger has dual outlets, the power may be shared between the outlets, so that you will never get the full power if both outlets are in use.

Also, some people are using the wrong cable. I know that Hyundai has in some cases delivered 20A cables as an original accessory instead of 32A, which would indeed limit the charging current.

Furthermore, a Danish member at this forum informed us that there's a law in Denmark limiting the current an AC-charger can provide.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq EV Premium Plus
Joined
·
496 Posts
This winter a Taxi driver in a 38 needed 45min to go 60-80% SoC at a 50kW DC charger.... I saw it while doing my errands... makes no sense. My car would have gone 0-94% in way less then that.
On the other hand - your 94% would only translate to 69% in the Ioniq 38!
 
21 - 40 of 43 Posts
Top