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yeah this is reassuring for future long time holders of this car.
While it may be reassuring to some extent, it is also zero information about the real longevity of the car with a hidden buffer. Out of sight, out of mind is Hyundai's strategy. One has to wonder why. I think it is just marketing - a bit subtle perhaps to increase customer satisfaction and retention. But no questions have been answered about Hyundai's battery performance versus other makers.
 

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While it may be reassuring to some extent, it is also zero information about the real longevity of the car with a hidden buffer. Out of sight, out of mind is Hyundai's strategy. One has to wonder why. I think it is just marketing - a bit subtle perhaps to increase customer satisfaction and retention. But no questions have been answered about Hyundai's battery performance versus other makers.

only time will tell, i will be keeping mine for atleast 8 years and any problems i will be definitely reporting it here.
 

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Depending on the size of the buffer (some have calculated it as small as 5%), you may not see any drop in range until well over 100,000 miles.
 

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Do you have any idea about how the battery is warming up if the car is in no use? We bought a New Ioniq and it will stay under the sun for about two months (we applied for gov subsidy and it takes a while).Summer is just starting with above 30 C degs (hopefully less Than 40 C degs). I appreciate any answer. Thanks.

The above two comments are spot on. Another factor that affects battery degradation is extreme heat (and to a lesser extent cold). So trying to avoid battery temps of 40 Deg C or more or -20 Deg C or less (especially with high loads at those times, will help). The active battery temperature management system on the IONIQ is very effective under normal conditions and covers this off nicely.

Lastly, lithium batteries will degrade over time even without use, there is a sort of slow baseline degradation - it's just part of the chemistry. All the other factors discussed above just add to that. That said, evidence suggests that there is no reason your IONIQ battery shouldn't last 10 years or 200,000 km (or more) with only minor noticeable degradation losses.
 

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IONIQ Electric, SE (w/ CCP) 2018.
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Do you have any idea about how the battery is warming up if the car is in no use? We bought a New Ioniq and it will stay under the sun for about two months (we applied for gov subsidy and it takes a while).Summer is just starting with above 30 C degs (hopefully less Than 40 C degs). I appreciate any answer. Thanks.
I can't speak directly to the 38 kWh IONIQ, but I can tell you that the 28 kWh IONIQ classic battery, will take on ambient temps quit quickly when left alone - usually within an hour or two, unless you had it much (+/- 10 Deg C) warmer or cooler than ambient. If you will not be driving your vehicle and it will be left for an extended period in summer heat of about 30 Deg C, then I'd recommend trying to maintain a battery SoC of between 50% and 70%. Under those conditions, I do not believe that you will incur any additional degradation over if your were using the vehicle normally. From what I've read, the battery doesn't like temps over 40 Deg C, so 30 Deg C should be fine.
 

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As far as high temperature battery degradation is concerned, I'll probably have some of the best data to report on the 38 Ioniq, since the location that I live is very hot. Even in my garage during the summer, the temperature is usually > 100 F from afternoon on to the night. To help this, I always try to park with battery < 60% SoC.
 

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I have a 2020 38kw Ioniq.
and have had a startling depreciation in my battery range. This is going by what the screen tells me. As I don't often charge my car to 100%. When I did yesterday I got rather a shock. When new at 100% my display said I could go 400km now it tells me 272km !!! the car is 6 months old and has done 21000km. I thought at first that the heater was on but it wasn't.
 

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The screen tells you an estimate based on recent driving. It's just a guess (that's why it's often called GOM or guess-o-meter), and doesn't indicate any absolute value based on battery health. E.g. if you do some highway driving, it will display less than slow urban driving. GOM of 270 km sounds quite normal to me.
 

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I have a 2020 38kw Ioniq.
and have had a startling depreciation in my battery range. This is going by what the screen tells me. As I don't often charge my car to 100%. When I did yesterday I got rather a shock. When new at 100% my display said I could go 400km now it tells me 272km !!! the car is 6 months old and has done 21000km. I thought at first that the heater was on but it wasn't.
Don't judge by the screen. As another user said, it was only an estimation based on recent driving. If you want to see the actual state of your battery, you have to bring it to an official car sevice. Most likely it is 100%. In the unlikely case if there is an issue, you still have the guarantee.
 

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@sarahbower1 272km = ~170 miles. That's about what I was seeing on my GOM during the winter here (UK). It has gone up to ~200 miles in warmer weather. I doubt it would go that far, though, if I hit the motorway and drive at 70mph (110km/h) constantly.

And, yes, to confirm, the GOM calculates based on state of charge plus average power use over recent driving - and that will depend on driving style and speeds (which in turn depends on types of road) PLUS ambient temperature. Expect it to go up after a spell of more gentle driving and/or higher temperatures - but I honestly wouldn't expect you to see 400km (=250 miles).
 

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The degradation on my Ioniq EV 2016 after about 78000km seem to be 3.7%

The way to calculate it was to charge the battery to 100%, and then drive it to 0% while periodically recording the CED and CEC values using the Torque. Then it is easy to see the relation between the percentage shown by the car, and the actual energy that went from and to the battery.

From the numbers it can be seen that the degradation started after passing about 20%, where about 15% less of the energy was stored in the battery compare to the SoC >20%. Also it unfortunately seems that BMS does not know or does not account for this degradation when calculating the range. So you might see your original range as if the car was new, while it is actually not there. The exact numbers where:

Percentages: Real energy/Calculated from % energy:
100%-78% 1.0
78%-56% 1.02
56%-36% 0.95
36%-19% 1.0
19%-2% 0.85
2%-0% 0.71

and the outside temperature was between 14 and 20 degrees C
 
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