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The above two comments are spot on. Another factor that affects battery degradation is extreme heat (and to a lesser extent cold). So trying to avoid battery temps of 40 Deg C or more or -20 Deg C or less (especially with high loads at those times, will help). The active battery temperature management system on the IONIQ is very effective under normal conditions and covers this off nicely.

Lastly, lithium batteries will degrade over time even without use, there is a sort of slow baseline degradation - it's just part of the chemistry. All the other factors discussed above just add to that. That said, evidence suggests that there is no reason your IONIQ battery shouldn't last 10 years or 200,000 km (or more) with only minor noticeable degradation losses.
 
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Yes, all these factors play their role, it is a complex process. Bjorn Nyland put the emphasis on the number of cycles, I think because in lab tests that is the way of testing.
 

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Yes, all these factors play their role, it is a complex process. Bjorn Nyland put the emphasis on the number of cycles, I think because in lab tests that is the way of testing.
And that car must have had a lot of cycles to get 92,000 km on the clock. I'm betting a lot of it was rapid charging. (Maybe a company rep)
 

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And that car must have had a lot of cycles to get 92,000 km on the clock. I'm betting a lot of it was rapid charging. (Maybe a company rep)
Let's do some maths on this. What is the "average" distance between charges for a high mileage vehicle like that? (It depends on so much). For me, it's probably about 120 km, my daily commute plus a small bit. So lets work with that.

92,000 km / 120 km = about 775 cycles

Average electrical consumption over summer and winter is probably very close to the quoted value of 14 kWh/100 km, which yields the 200 km range for the vehicle.

120 km/200 km = 60%. Average charge is only a 60% cycle.

With this type of use, I don't think that 2,000 or even 2,500 cycles should be a problem. So he's about 775 cycles/2250 cycle = 34% through the life of the battery. Therefore, expected odo reading when battery has "failed" should be around 270,000 km - not bad!

OB
 

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I would suggest to watch for charge rate tapering when battery is almost full. On new Ionic EV it just drops from 6.6kWh to 0kWh at worm temperatures. I saw some "artificial step ladder" in the winter (below freezing point), but it was very short, just a few minutes. For example: my 4 years old Leaf would struggle for over an hour to add last kWh to the battery.

So when you start seeing prolonged tapper at the end of charge cycle - it means your battery capacity decreased below original upper buffer threshold and you are about to start to experience reduction in range.
 

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I've never been able to connect via my OBD port with Torque app, I suspected a dodgy port or something but he showed it's fine, perhaps I'll try with a different phone.
You are using a wireless OBD reader? Some of them really miss the boat so it might not be working at all, or not be compatible with your phone.
 

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Bjorn's degradation is interesting. And 8% degradation on a car that has done 92,000km seems reasonable.
It is the very first time I have seen a number for SOH other than 100%.
But it is all based on guesswork.
The app canIoniq - seems to have failed. It showed 100% SOH. Perhaps because it jammed during the drive.
He guesses 5% efficiency loss on charging, probably just so the input kWh matches the output.
He compares the numbers to the usable capacity a new car should have 28kWh.
A better technique would be to compare the values obtained from that car when it was new.

He did a 1000km driving test in that car and the car performed really well. Hence at 92,000km the Ioniq Electric is still a really good car. That is the more important takeaway than this guess of 8%.
 

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I went ahead and measured my Ioniqs battery capacity. My Ioniq is MY19 and registered at March of 2019, driven for 13500km.
I drove 90km/h for the most part and needed very little HVAC, some of the drive was in city and some 30km was at 100km/h.

What I get from the test was that the 100->60% has a larger capacity than the rest 60%. Obviously I only drove the battery down to 10% and not 0% so can't say how much capacity the last 10% contains. If i extrapolate from the whole trip, capacity is 27kWh and if I use the latter values then 26,7kWh.
The regeneration is included in the values as Ioniq subtracts regeneration from the overall consumption. Any ideas how to take the regeneration into account? I'm thinking it doesn't affect the capacity in my calculations (km times average consumption).
 

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Your observation is correct for display SOC - the real battery capacity is over-reported above 50% and under-reported under 50%. So at 100% display - your battery is 95% and at 0% display your battery is 5%. It is causing some discrepancy in % per distance traveled relation. But overall it levels out to closely match original range estimate vs. miles driven when driving conditions are neutral.
 

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My MY2019 car (delivered in November 2018) has done little over 20000km. As new I measured the capasity with a kWh meter, and a week ago did the same thing. No change, both times nearly 32kWh/100%.
Measuring the last time from 20% to 100%.
 

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I did a test this weekend with CanIoniq and my Vgate odb adapter: 99% SoH after 98k km. Anyone else experience with CanIoniq?
 

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Yip, I've got 72,000 km on the clock and 100% SoH. I use CanIoniq and EVNotify (not simultaneously) depending on what I'm looking for. I use EVNotify primarily to link with ABRP.
 
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100% SoH is not really possible. Those apps are just reading the car's fake news. Every laptop and cell phone I've owned shows a drop in capacity after just a few cycles (or when I first think to check).
 

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Before I ditched my 2018 Ioniq, the dealerships OBD reader gave 100% SoH at 70-something thousand KM. Obviously it’s probably lost that magic buffer that everybody likes to remind us about, but honestly, if the “usable” battery is still 100%, then who cares about the buffer loss; it’s expected. And yes, the usable life will start to diminish, but again, usable battery at 100% as of +70,000km
 

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While 100% is good marketing, it is not helpful to owners attempting to determine if their charging patterns are good or bad for battery health and longevity. It is also terribly misleading to anyone trying to value a used car purchase between two cars with apparently identical SoH. I'd rather buy a used EV from someone who wasn't constantly using DCFC. No way to tell - thanks Hyundai!

Here is another example for you: SoH reads 90% but actual battery degradation is 30%. Good luck trying to get warranty service from Hyundai.
 

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100% SoH is not really possible. Those apps are just reading the car's fake news. Every laptop and cell phone I've owned shows a drop in capacity after just a few cycles (or when I first think to check).
The app reports BMS SoC and "Display" SoC, Mine still has all the top and bottom buffer and the car reports a SoH of 100%.

I also don't think that comparing a EV battery to a cell phone is justified. Cell phones are typically replaced every 2 or 3 years. Manufacturers won't waste money providing a battery that's good for 5 yrs (or more) knowing the device is on the scrap heap in 3 years, 98% of the time. So users have come to expect significant degradation, it's also planned obsolescence for the manufacturer. However, there is a big different between a $1,000 phone (that's "free" on contract), and a $30,000 vehicle. No one expects their EV battery to be toast or replaced after 2 or 3 years.

No doubt there is some level of degradation, but I think that Hyundai were very conservative on the IONIQ (especially with the problems Nissan had with the initial Leafs) and there is probably more reserve built in that's being used than we know about. Either way, my car's range is still the same as the day it was bought and that's what counts.
 

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I agree with Hyundai being conservative, hiding all degradation in a hidden buffer. Magic, zero degradation compared to all other EVs! If that buffer was 50%, you would be happy with no loss of range for at least 20 years.
 

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I suppose another way to do it is to do a set trip of about 300km and then a year later do the same trip with the same conditions and compare everything.
 

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I've had my phev for about two years now. I have the same drive to work every day. On mornings when the battery is fully recharged I watch to see how far I get before using the first bar on the charge indicator. This point changes based on the weather but over time I have gotten an idea of the usual distance and the max distance. Maybe not a 300 km trip but its a similar idea.

And on summer weekends I take a longer trip that exceeds the battery range. So I can compare max range in EV mode one year to the next.
 

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And on summer weekends I take a longer trip that exceeds the battery range. So I can compare max range in EV mode one year to the next.
To the extent you make both trips in identical driving conditions, you won't see a difference in range. At least not for many years until degradation has exhausted the hidden buffer.
 
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