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In my group of friends I'm typically the guy to ask about automotive stuff, so I'm a bit embarrassed to ask this question. My only experience in driving in snow and ice in a RWD car was decades ago, living in an area where those conditions were rare, back when there were only RWD cars and 4WD trucks. The car drivers were expected to install chains when things got slimy. I remember even with chains you could find yourself in a situation where the front wheels wouldn't steer you up even a gentle slope and you were basically stuck.

When I moved to areas where there was a real winter, I always had FWD or AWD and never had a problem. During those decades technology has advanced.

So now I'm thinking about an Ioniq 5, seeing that the RWD version gets significantly better range, and also that in the AWD version the front wheels are completely disengaged much of the time. And now we have traction control (TC) and automatic stability control (ASC). So my question is, today, how big an improvement is AWD over RWD with electronic assist? Seems to me that a decent ASC would detect if the steering wheel was turned but the car wasn't changing direction, and add some one-side braking to help. With RWD you only have driving force through the rear wheels, but traction control would allow you to make the most of that, without spinning up the lower-traction wheel - AWD would be better climbing the steeper hills, but would assisted RWD suffice in most cases?

Anyone here with experience with well-assisted RWD in nasty winter conditions? What do you think?
 

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Like you, many years since I had a RWD. The Ioniq 5 has a Snow mode that on the AWD permanently engages the front drive motor. Where I live we seldom get heavy snow. Hopefully owners in Norway and Sweden and other Baltic states will be better able to answer you question.
 

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2022 Ioniq 5 AWD Balance Vision
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In my group of friends I'm typically the guy to ask about automotive stuff, so I'm a bit embarrassed to ask this question. My only experience in driving in snow and ice in a RWD car was decades ago, living in an area where those conditions were rare, back when there were only RWD cars and 4WD trucks. The car drivers were expected to install chains when things got slimy. I remember even with chains you could find yourself in a situation where the front wheels wouldn't steer you up even a gentle slope and you were basically stuck.

When I moved to areas where there was a real winter, I always had FWD or AWD and never had a problem. During those decades technology has advanced.

So now I'm thinking about an Ioniq 5, seeing that the RWD version gets significantly better range, and also that in the AWD version the front wheels are completely disengaged much of the time. And now we have traction control (TC) and automatic stability control (ASC). So my question is, today, how big an improvement is AWD over RWD with electronic assist? Seems to me that a decent ASC would detect if the steering wheel was turned but the car wasn't changing direction, and add some one-side braking to help. With RWD you only have driving force through the rear wheels, but traction control would allow you to make the most of that, without spinning up the lower-traction wheel - AWD would be better climbing the steeper hills, but would assisted RWD suffice in most cases?

Anyone here with experience with well-assisted RWD in nasty winter conditions? What do you think?
I think in your case, you have real severe winters you better go for the AWD.
In real tests the range differs maximum 20km (+/- 12 miles) on higher speed (130kmh/80mph) and only 13km(+/- 8 miles) on low speed (100kmh/62mph).
Snow mode will help you to get permanent 4WD with controlled and reduced acceleration and deceleration.
The RWD version will drive well with winter tyres in such a conditions, but the question is, how severe will the traction control act to prevent spinning or slipping. Sometimes it will end in a complete standstill.
 

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2022 Ioniq 5 AWD Balance Vision
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This test was in Austria at 40 deg C (104 deg F). There were a lot of cars to do a slalom test on a slippery surface, simulating snow and ice. The Ioniq 5 RWD, did it very well and could be easily controlled. The biggest surprise were 2 Tesla 3 LR AWD that failed the test completely, because on the brake test, all the electronics stopped to functioning. After investigating, the cause of this trouble was the high temperature. Both Tesla had to replace their 4 tires because of flat spots due the failing ABS.
 

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2021 Chevy Bolt, reserved Ioniq 5
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This test was in Austria at 40 deg C (104 deg F). There were a lot of cars to do a slalom test on a slippery surface, simulating snow and ice. The Ioniq 5 RWD, did it very well and could be easily controlled. The biggest surprise were 2 Tesla 3 LR AWD that failed the test completely, because on the brake test, all the electronics stopped to functioning. After investigating, the cause of this trouble was the high temperature. Both Tesla had to replace their 4 tires because of flat spots due the failing ABS.
We live in SE Arizona where 40° C (104° F) is not unusual during the summer. I have not heard of any issue with the Tesla ABS brakes due to temperature. At the end of the video, I believe he said the ABS failure was probably due to the computer overheating and turning itself off. Do you agree?

Since my last German lessons were in 1974, I only understand a little of what is said. However, I turned on the closed captions with translation to English. (not perfect but combined with the audio I think I got most of it)
 

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We live in SE Arizona where 40° C (104° F) is not unusual during the summer. I have not heard of any issue with the Tesla ABS brakes due to temperature. At the end of the video, I believe he said the ABS failure was probably due to the computer overheating and turning itself off. Do you agree?

Since my last German lessons were in 1974, I only understand a little of what is said. However, I turned on the closed captions with translation to English. (not perfect but combined with the audio I think I got most of it)
Yes that is what the Austrian car experts from that test centrum said. Strange that 2 had the same issue, after intense handling and braking tests on slippery test road. Both did an emergency brake test on slippery road surface. The diagnostic messages on the cars said clearly that nearly all electronics were temporarily out of service :
  • cruise control deactivated
  • ABS deactivated
  • Regenerative braking system deactivated
  • Safety/Comfort Autopilot not available
  • Emergency brake automatic deactivated
  • Hold function not available
  • Traction control deactivated
  • Stability control deactivated

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That must be a serious issue for the teslas. You do not want the abs to fail in an emergency. I can see these systems working a lot during winter, also generating heat then. Probably not a big problem, but nevertheless serious.
 

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Like you, many years since I had a RWD. The Ioniq 5 has a Snow mode that on the AWD permanently engages the front drive motor. Where I live we seldom get heavy snow. Hopefully owners in Norway and Sweden and other Baltic states will be better able to answer you question.
@George56 so front motor is perma on in snow mode. Do you know how the 2 motors are used in all other modes?
 

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I live in Norway and at the end of a gravel road with relatively steepe inclines. All modes will engage awd to a certain degree, mostly 30-70 with normal power. More like 50-50 if needed, and also 100-0 when mostly coasting/low power cruising. You will sometimes feel the clutch(!) or something engage when slips are detected I think, or in bends going upwards. I heard there is a clutch mechanism between the front motor and the gear box/driveshafts.
 

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My understanding is;-

Eco Mode - Rear motor only is used.
Comfort mode - Rear motor mostly, with front motor used as well for pulling away from rest.
Sport mode - Both motors used at all times.
 

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Anyone notice if there is an indication of front drive engagement status on this screen? The details in Chapter 6 do not shed much additional light on when the front motor is engaged, other than to say that it's automatic based on conditions. There is one phrase in broken English that might imply that 4wd is always on in sport mode. Both Eco and Normal make references to "auto changing 2wd/4wd".
 

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My understanding is;-

Eco Mode - Rear motor only is used.
Comfort mode - Rear motor mostly, with front motor used as well for pulling away from rest.
Sport mode - Both motors used at all times.
From reading the manual:

ECO mode is a driving mode vehicles could change the engagement status of the motor according to the situation
required. Auto changing the driving mode(2WD/4WD)helps improve energy efficiency.

Normal mode is a driving with auto changing the driving mode(2WD/4WD) on road condition.

SPORT mode is a driving mode improving driving performance by fixing 4WD system and controlling reduction
gear.

SNOW mode is a driving mode improving driving performance by changing the engagement status of the motor
according to the situation required. Auto changing the driving mode(2WD/4WD) helps improve driving stability.
However also states
When SNOW mode is activated, the driving power is distributed to four wheels automatically, increasing the
stability of the vehicle.
So in SNOW mode it must also auto brake individual wheels to distribute power.
 

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There is a display in the car showing power distribution. The car distributes power as needed in all three basic modes. But in snow mode you have permanent awd. I do own the car, so this is from my own experience, not the manual. Every mode utilizes AWD when needed, and also is pure RWD in low power situations. I have to check again in sport mode, but I am 90% certain that it also is mostly RWD. Of course, it will utilize awd more frequently because more power is added earlier when you accellerate.
 

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In ECO mode
  • permanently RWD
  • slightly reduced power
  • reduced acceleration
in Normal mode
  • On dry road surface until 25km/h AWD and then RWD
  • AWD can be used at higher speed, depending on the road surface.
  • normal acceleration
In Sport mode
  • permanent AWD
  • max power output
  • max acceleration
in Snow mode -
  • permanent AWD
  • reduced power
  • slow acceleration
  • max regeneration level 1
 

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Asian Petrolhead test it several times in all the modes and could not get AWD in eco mode (in dry road conditions) In the normal mode he got AWD until exactly 25km/h and then RWD only. Now you show me AWD in Eco mode below 25km/h , but I see 15 deg C and a wet windscreen (if I am right).
 

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Yes. It was not raining much, and this was a gravel road, but low application of power and no loss of traction I think. Probably no awd above 25 in eco. I do get awd in normal mode above 25 as well, as this is the mode I normally use. But I'll have to double check.
 
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