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I have a couple of months left on my lease. Have about 70K. I Had made the same commute six days a week. The range was never a factor until the last eight months. Living in Southern California, my winter charges about 125, summer 135-140. Now I have been getting 100/114. At one point, I was thinking about purchasing the vehicle at the end of the lease, but now I have occasionally fast charge just to get home. Not worth keeping. I had made an appointment with the dealer since it had a lifetime warranty on the battery, unfortunately, after speaking with the adviser over the phone, he mentions battery degrading would not be covered. I will look at other vehicle options now for purchase, Kona EV will not be considered knowledge of their battery problems.
You did high mileage lease?
 

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Just checked my battery cell voltages - every single cell is at 4.12V @ 99% Display SOC @ 52F battery (45F ambient) with 130 miles range, I would say even deviation over 0.02V is worse investigating or keep an eye on it. In my case, I took readings in the morning after car was resting overnight, so all cells were at the same temperature. When taking readings after driving you may see small 0.02V deviations - it is because of some cells are closer to battery cover and some are deep inside, so they are at slightly different temperatures that creates small voltage deviations. So after ~1.5 year (2 year since manufacturing) the battery is in perfect health. Quite different vs. Leaf 2015 where cell voltages were all over the place, but with in 0.035V deviations with battery SOH ~95%
Do you know if you set the charge to 80% if the car balances the cells or does it only do it if you charge it all the way to 100%
 

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Do you know if you set the charge to 80% if the car balances the cells or does it only do it if you charge it all the way to 100%
I would guess that it does not balance, but it will be quite enough to balance the cells every once in a while. Ioniq EV:s battery management system is top notch and rarely even has unbalanced cells.
 

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Normally, li-ion battery balancer kicks in at specific voltage level and would work on background to level the cells. I do not think you need to charge battery to 100% to activate it. Maybe 2020 38kWh version could be a clue about the SOC level recommended by manufacturer, the same most likely true for 28kWh version.
 

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Yes. My car is 5 months old. When I got it it could go 400km and now it is down to 353km The car has done 17000km. I drive it like a granny and never take it below 25% and very really above 90%. I use fast DC chargers about twice a week and the rest of the time trickle charge. A BIT SCARY. I was hoping that the batteries were going to last 8 years.
 

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Hello, I have dismantled 28 kWh pack from wrecked 2018 Ioniq here. Car had only 22000 kms and was driven in Norway, so no real heat damage. Capacity of cells from 4,15 V to 3,30 V is 72,4 Ah. I suppose I could measure it till 3,00 V to get more realistic measurement, but curve is falling like a rock below 3,40 V. Discharged at 20 A, so about 1/4 C. My best guess on usable capacity in working voltage range of this cell in car is 75 Ah. It should have rated nominal of 78 Ah I believe I saw somewhere. So there is surely some degradation even after 20000 kms. You just don't see it.
 

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Hello, I have dismantled 28 kWh pack from wrecked 2018 Ioniq here. Car had only 22000 kms and was driven in Norway, so no real heat damage. Capacity of cells from 4,15 V to 3,30 V is 72,4 Ah. I suppose I could measure it till 3,00 V to get more realistic measurement, but curve is falling like a rock below 3,40 V. Discharged at 20 A, so about 1/4 C. My best guess on usable capacity in working voltage range of this cell in car is 75 Ah. It should have rated nominal of 78 Ah I believe I saw somewhere. So there is surely some degradation even after 20000 kms. You just don't see it.

can you use an app like evnotify to see battery soh?

mine is showing 100% (last line on picture)

 

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I don't even have ioniq, just dismantled battery. So nope. And to be frank, 28 kWhs is pure capacity of those batteries in measured cycle from 4,15 V to 3 V. Nominal capacity is 78 Ahs for double cell. There is no buffer.
 

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Yes. My car is 5 months old. When I got it it could go 400km and now it is down to 353km The car has done 17000km. I drive it like a granny and never take it below 25% and very really above 90%. I use fast DC chargers about twice a week and the rest of the time trickle charge. A BIT SCARY. I was hoping that the batteries were going to last 8 years.
Just comparing range is not a very good way of measuring battery degradation, because the range can vary a great deal with driving conditions. Since you're in Australia, I assume that temperatures have been dropping a bit lately as you're getting closer to winter. That will affect range. During the same five months, my range has actually increased as we're getting closer to summer on the northern hemisphere. But that doesn't mean that the health of my battery is magically improving, just that my car consumes less energy as it's getting warmer outside.

To really determine if there's any degradation, you'll have to measure how many kWh you can actually withdraw from a fully charged battery by driving until it's almost empty.

Bjørn Nyland has a few things to say about how to do it:

Even though he speaks specifically of Teslas, much of what he says applies to any electric car.

While I haven't found anywhere to see the total energy used during a drive in the Ioniq, what you can do is reset the trip meter when your battery is 100% charged. When you're done, and almost empty, read the energy consumption (kWh per 100 km). Multiply by kilometers driven and divide by 100. There you have the energy used in kWh.
 

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While I haven't found anywhere to see the total energy used during a drive in the Ioniq, what you can do is reset the trip meter when your battery is 100% charged. When you're done, and almost empty, read the energy consumption (kWh per 100 km). Multiply by kilometers driven and divide by 100. There you have the energy used in kWh.
Alternatively you could measure the kWh's going into the battery slow charging and factor in the percentage remaining at the start of charging. Best with a nearly empty battery and use the same setup each time. This gave me steady value from when I started to drive in 2017. Do note the temperature because this should be about the same when testing.
 

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Yes. My car is 5 months old. When I got it it could go 400km and now it is down to 353km The car has done 17000km. I drive it like a granny and never take it below 25% and very really above 90%. I use fast DC chargers about twice a week and the rest of the time trickle charge. A BIT SCARY. I was hoping that the batteries were going to last 8 years.
Sarah

As noted above, you are heading into your winter season in Australia and this is undoubtedly the reason your range is dropping - not degradation. I've got 75,000 km on my IONIQ and have not noticed any loss in range at all (comparing Apr 2018 to Apr 2019 and Apr 2020). In reality, there must have been some small amount, but it is "hidden" by the buffer. I don't expect to see any loss in range for a long time due to that. Note my summer range is usually in the 230 to 240 km range and my winter range is between 170 and 180 km. That's a +/-35% change. I live in Vancouver, for some that live in places that get really cold, the range loss in the dead of winter is much more pronounced.

I do have an OBDII dongle and EVNotify reports that the SoH parameter monitored by the car it's self, is still at 100% which is a good sign. Btw, 17,000 km in 5 months is some high milage, does your work require you to do a lot of travelling? What sort of daily driving do you do?

Regards

OB
 

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I don't even have ioniq, just dismantled battery. So nope. And to be frank, 28 kWhs is pure capacity of those batteries in measured cycle from 4,15 V to 3 V. Nominal capacity is 78 Ahs for double cell. There is no buffer.
I disagree with this statement for a few simple reasons.

1) As most people know, some degree of loss will occur over time and use. After nearly 2 years and 80,000km, I still had full availability of the 28kWh capacity. I do not believe absolutely 0 losses have occurred.

2) It's been well documented that the battery has a capacity somewhere in the 31kWh range

3) I've observed the battery overcharge due to the pre-conditioning, meaning that it is possible to charge beyond the cutoff point of 28kWh that the on-board charger wants to cut it off at.

Do you have any pictures of the dismantled battery?
 

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Hi.
I just bought a used ioniq electric 2017 model which have gone 60.000km. I decided to do a range and consumption test.

I drove for 233km with a 105wh/km consumption. I fully charged it 100% and down to 3%. So if I do the math, 233*105/0.97=25.2kwh usable energy. Does this mean that I have lost 3kw of energy? The route I drove is a lot of ups and downs hilly terrain, a total of 600m elevation. After I had depleted the battery, I connected the slow charger (2.4kw). I also used a wattmeter to see how much energy was being delivered to the car. A total of 28.55 kwh was pulled from the wall (see the attached picture). I guess some of it is lost as heat. Can it be as much as 3kw lost in the AC to DC conversion?
 

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Hello, 10 % loss is pretty normal when doing slow charging. And I would guess that 2,8 kWh loss of capacity is still pretty good. You have 10 % od degradation.
 

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It would be interesting if someone else could drain down the battery as low as possible and then connect a wattmeter to the slow charger to see how many kwh is pulled from the socket. My result is 28.55kwh from 3% to 100%. That took 12 hours exactly. If there is a 10% loss, it would be 33kwh instead to fully charge. That would take over 13 hours. The manual says 12 hours from 0 to 100 with slow charge.
 

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Yes. My car is 5 months old. When I got it it could go 400km and now it is down to 353km The car has done 17000km. I drive it like a granny and never take it below 25% and very really above 90%. I use fast DC chargers about twice a week and the rest of the time trickle charge. A BIT SCARY. I was hoping that the batteries were going to last 8 years.
is that 400km actual driven range, or the guestimate on the instrument cluster?

also temperature and conditions make a massive difference on range, higher temps = more AC use, lower temps =more heating use, rain / snow = more rolling resistance, biggest of all speed

there is a graph and table for the 28KWh ioniq by @Jan Treur in the EV section, where range has been used against speed and temp i think, not sure if he has one for the 38KWh Ioniq yet
 

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It would be interesting if someone else could drain down the battery as low as possible and then connect a wattmeter to the slow charger to see how many kwh is pulled from the socket. My result is 28.55kwh from 3% to 100%. That took 12 hours exactly. If there is a 10% loss, it would be 33kwh instead to fully charge. That would take over 13 hours. The manual says 12 hours from 0 to 100 with slow charge.
28,55 kWh is how much you pulled from socket, isn't it?
 

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Then it fits. 28,55 - 10 % is 25,7 kWhs. You said you have usable 25,2 kWhs according to your driving test, so it is pretty close.
 
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