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Second winter here, ~20 000kms, I haven't seen any signs of degradation so far. Charge it to 100% every day on 240v and drive it in sports mode almost allthe time. I'm not worried about the battery. Time will tell, but with the 8years/160 000 kms warranty, why shoud I? Lots of my friends also have evs of different makes and it seems so far that battery degradation is a Leaf problem only because it doesn't have a BMS. My brother changed its 2012 leaf for a 2019 bolt because of that.
 

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Discussion Starter #62
There are at least 5% top and bottom buffers on Ioniq EV. Bigger than most EVs. I do not think you have battery degradation, but most likely one or two bad cells. Use Torque or any other app you can to look at the individual cells voltages when fully charged and partially discharged, if you see > .02 Volt discrepancy (.02 V is usually caused by temperature deviation) bring the car to dealership for battery diagnostic and explain what is happening. Just like I said in earlier discussions, normal overall degradation is not the problem. It is very slow and gradual. When you notice abrupt drop in range - most of the time, it is one or few cells that drag the whole battery down. Good thing about Ioniq EV - the battery is serviceable, so it could be addressed very economically.
This is what normal battery cell voltage distribution looks like (Soul EV Spy for Ioniq EV):
View attachment 30876
I think you are right. I may have a couple of bad cells.
 

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Lots of my friends also have evs of different makes and it seems so far that battery degradation is a Leaf problem only because it doesn't have a BMS. My brother changed its 2012 leaf for a 2019 bolt because of that.
Every EV has a BMS, what leaf is missing is a cooling system for the battery.
 

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No, it does not seem like that. Although it is difficult to get something in writing from Hyundai on this, their suggestion is that only the buffer decreases whereas the 100% still keeps the same kWh, until the buffer has become 0%. This is at least in line with the experience of many owners that in the first two or three years the range remains the same. When the 100% would become less kWh, that would have become clear in a decreasing range. The open question is how long it takes until the buffer has become 0, or in other words, until the total capacity has lost 10%.
does torque show the real SoH?
(using the PIDs in your profile?
 

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I have the first gen ionic ev at 50k miles
And my range has gone from 125 on average to 104. In the past 2 months. I'm assuming that changing tires is to blame as I recently swapped to Toyo Extensa tires which online show 3lbs heavier per tire than the oem. Anyone else notice a change when swapping tires or is it just the battery failing
I drive 75 miles to work, 4hr charge to 100% (26 amp) and 75 miles home to my charger 4hr 100% (32 amp clippercreek at both sites)
 

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Weight of the tire doesn't play a role, but the rolling resistance does. From 125 to 104 is a 17% drop and I have trouble with the idea that Toyo would be so appaling bad at rolling resistance compared to your last set.

Are you sure you have had no changes in your driving behavior?
 

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New tires always take a bit of time to break in and lower their rolling resistance. Then there's diameter changes to consider. Even if you buy the exact same tire, a new one has more tread and travels a further distance with every revolution. That means the car is not reporting as much distance covered for any given amount of energy expenditure. This alone can account for 3% difference.
 

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New tires always take a bit of time to break in and lower their rolling resistance. Then there's diameter changes to consider. Even if you buy the exact same tire, a new one has more tread and travels a further distance with every revolution. That means the car is not reporting as much distance covered for any given amount of energy expenditure. This alone can account for 3% difference.
Are you sure Ioniq doesn't compensate for the difference via GPS? The speedometer and the difference isn't linear according to my tests, it seems to have a fixed 4km/h added extra compared to the real speed no matter how fast I drive. For example speedometer 45km/h -> 41km/h real speed, speedometer 105km/h -> 101km/h real speed.
This seems to be consistent with summer and winter tyres.
 

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I'm not sure, but most vehicles use rotational timing to calculate range, speed, and distance. I don't think a vehicle would use GPS to estimate range (and distance covered) because it's very easy to lose a GPS signal whereas rev counting is very reliable.

My motorcycle guesses 6% high across the speed range. That guess would still be affected by the diameter of tire I'm running and subject to changes as the tire wears.
 

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My car was just about dead on past radar warning signs when I first bought it. At about 20,000 miles due presumably to tire wear, it now reads one mph too fast.
 

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My driving habit have not changed. The tires do seem to have much better traction. I just found that my spoiler/trunk is loose possibly creating excess drag
 

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I have a couple of months left on my lease. Have about 70K. I Had made the same commute six days a week. The range was never a factor until the last eight months. Living in Southern California, my winter charges about 125, summer 135-140. Now I have been getting 100/114. At one point, I was thinking about purchasing the vehicle at the end of the lease, but now I have occasionally fast charge just to get home. Not worth keeping. I had made an appointment with the dealer since it had a lifetime warranty on the battery, unfortunately, after speaking with the adviser over the phone, he mentions battery degrading would not be covered. I will look at other vehicle options now for purchase, Kona EV will not be considered knowledge of their battery problems.
 

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I purchased mine out and experiencing same range issues. I'm not sure why the battery dropped off so sharply or how it can be fixed. I would like to know the price of repairing or replacing to get back to 120 range
 

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I based my information from an adviser who mentioned the Ioniq and the Kona had a similar battery system. Indicating I would probably have the same problem in the future. After reading Petteri's response, I went online to compared both vehicles; obviously, I received the wrong information.
 

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I based my information from an adviser who mentioned the Ioniq and the Kona had a similar battery system. Indicating I would probably have the same problem in the future. After reading Petteri's response, I went online to compared both vehicles; obviously, I received the wrong information.
Get yourself an app and OBDII adapter and check your car battery cell voltages. The battery capacity does not drop abruptly due to gradual capacity loss, this is why it is called gradual, over time. Any sudden drop in range is result of one or two cells failing that brings the whole battery down. Any bad cell are easy to spot as their voltage differentiates significantly from the rest of the cells, any cell with > 0.02V drop (yes this small, but means a lot in the Li-Ion state of charge) is potential suspect. I would suggest to check before you charge, so those weak cells are easier to spot due to voltage drop due to lower capacity. Ones you know this you can push dealer to ran a battery diagnostic that will show those bad cells, so they could start working on correcting it instead of making up stories about degradation. The majority of cells are wearing gradually, any unusually weak one points to a defect in the cell and subject to warranty repair.
 

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I'm pretty sure the Kona has a lot less problems due to the watercooling and much higher capacity. That translates to a smaller C-rating when charging and discharging. On top of the previous there is a lot less charging cycles in total.
To be clear, does the 2020 Ioniq EV have liquid battery cooling like the Kona EV does? I read online that it has a BMS, but I'm still unclear whether that means it does liquid cooling. I think it has liquid cooling because when I have DCFC'd before, I have opened the hood and seen the coolant line running while it was charging, so I assumed this was cooling the battery during fast charge.
 

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To be clear, does the 2020 Ioniq EV have liquid battery cooling like the Kona EV does? I read online that it has a BMS, but I'm still unclear whether that means it does liquid cooling. I think it has liquid cooling because when I have DCFC'd before, I have opened the hood and seen the coolant line running while it was charging, so I assumed this was cooling the battery during fast charge.
The facelift 2020 Ioniq has water cooling. All electric cars and Hybrids have a BMS that controls charging and discharging. Classic Ioniq has active aircooling that most of the time does its job but I think that in the hotter regions it is inadequate.
 

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Just checked my battery cell voltages - every single cell is at 4.12V @ 99% Display SOC @ 52F battery (45F ambient) with 130 miles range, I would say even deviation over 0.02V is worse investigating or keep an eye on it. In my case, I took readings in the morning after car was resting overnight, so all cells were at the same temperature. When taking readings after driving you may see small 0.02V deviations - it is because of some cells are closer to battery cover and some are deep inside, so they are at slightly different temperatures that creates small voltage deviations. So after ~1.5 year (2 year since manufacturing) the battery is in perfect health. Quite different vs. Leaf 2015 where cell voltages were all over the place, but with in 0.035V deviations with battery SOH ~95%
 
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