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Discussion Starter #1
My 2017 Ioniq EV with 62,000 miles on the odometer and 26 months of ownership is getting about 3.6 miles/kWh. I am seeing definite battery degradation after about 50,000 miles. It's hard to get more than 100 miles on a full charge now. I live on the coast of Southern California where ambient temperature doesn't fluctuate much. My driving routine has not changed and I used to get about 125 miles per charge when it was new, the variables that would affect individual rates are pretty much constant so I think it's battery degradation.
 

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You should try and get a odb2 adapter, and the app EVnotify. connect it to the dongle, and you will see all the info on the car. including SOH ( state of health ) on the battery,
then you would see if you really have battery degradation or not.

let us know :)
 

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My miles / kWh have not changed much since getting the car in 2017. If anything they have slightly improved - perhaps I'm being more careful. Summer range is 158 miles and winter 145 miles. I have never used a fast DC charger and usually charge using the 7kW home charger or the granny charger - and usually to 100%. My milage is not high, only 19,000 total so far.
 

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From 125miles down to 100miles, that is 20% degradation which is quite a lot.

Could you share a bit more about your charging habit and frequency?
Do you charge it on daily basis?
To 80% or 100%
AC or rapid DC charging?
 

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Battery Degredation involves a reduction in the capacity of the battery, not a reduction in the efficiency at which the car drives.

125 miles from a 28kWh pack would suggest efficiency around 4.5 miles per kWh.

Around 100 miles at 3.6 miles per kWh would suggest a 28kWh capacity pack.

Chances are, degredation isn't the cause of the reduced range. Reduced efficiency is. And the most likely causes of that are weather, speed, driving style and tyres.

TBH 3.6 miles per kWh seems really low for an Ioniq in California. I get better than that from an old Leaf in England, where it's currently 52°F and rainy.
 

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My 2017 Ioniq EV with 62,000 miles on the odometer and 26 months of ownership is getting about 3.6 miles/kWh. I am seeing definite battery degradation after about 50,000 miles. It's hard to get more than 100 miles on a full charge now. I live on the coast of Southern California where ambient temperature doesn't fluctuate much. My driving routine has not changed and I used to get about 125 miles per charge when it was new, the variables that would affect individual rates are pretty much constant so I think it's battery degradation.
Have you changed tires? I'm guessing you must have by 62,000 miles. That is usually a major cause of decreased range. That would also account for decreased miles/kwh. As said prior, a degrading battery should not have much effect on efficiency. My prior car to the Ionic was a Nissan Leaf, which is the king of degredation. I am worried about the fact that the Hyundai battery cooling system seems to be very similar to Nissan's. Almost all other manufactures use liquid cooling (including Hyundai on the new Kona EV).
 

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You should try and get a odb2 adapter, and the app EVnotify. connect it to the dongle, and you will see all the info on the car. including SOH ( state of health ) on the battery,
then you would see if you really have battery degradation or not.

let us know :)
Hi,

I'm a new Ioniq owner. This is the first I have heard of this app. Can you point me to some information on it's use with the Ionic? I had Leafspy for the Leaf, that was awesome.
 

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My miles / kWh have not changed much since getting the car in 2017. If anything they have slightly improved - perhaps I'm being more careful. Summer range is 158 miles and winter 145 miles. I have never used a fast DC charger and usually charge using the 7kW home charger or the granny charger - and usually to 100%. My milage is not high, only 19,000 total so far.
You’ve never used a fast DC charger? Is there evidence that demonstrates the damage caused by fast DC charging (under 80%)? I am new to the EV world, just started my lease on a 2019 Ioniq Electric.
 

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You’ve never used a fast DC charger? Is there evidence that demonstrates the damage caused by fast DC charging (under 80%)? I am new to the EV world, just started my lease on a 2019 Ioniq Electric.
Welcome to the EV world. You'll love it.
The batteries are quite rugged these days, and the Battery Management Systems (BMS) are really good at protecting the battery from misuse. The thing to avoid is deep discharge cycles.The following web page has some good advice. https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries
 

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Welcome to the EV world. You'll love it.
The batteries are quite rugged these days, and the Battery Management Systems (BMS) are really good at protecting the battery from misuse. The thing to avoid is deep discharge cycles.The following web page has some good advice. https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries
So the "red line" of the battery really is detrimental to the battery. That makes sense for the way it's been marked then. I'll try not to go under that line.
 

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So the "red line" of the battery really is detrimental to the battery. That makes sense for the way it's been marked then. I'll try not to go under that line.
The same study tells us to charge only to 80% real voltage (85% on display) and discharge to 25% real voltage (20% on display). Tesla recommends charging to 90% real voltage daily and that the biggest difference to longevity comes from avoiding the top 5% and bottom 5%. Ioniq charges only to 95% of real voltage so 100% on display is for the most time fine if not optimal for maximum longevity.
 

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The same study tells us to charge only to 80% real voltage (85% on display) and discharge to 25% real voltage (20% on display). Tesla recommends charging to 90% real voltage daily and that the biggest difference to longevity comes from avoiding the top 5% and bottom 5%. Ioniq charges only to 95% of real voltage so 100% on display is for the most time fine if not optimal for maximum longevity.
Yep. Try to imagine the battery charge as a bell curve. Optimum usage is going to be in the centre of the bell curve, and try to avoid the 10-15% at the edges as much as possible. Also, remember that this is over the lifetime of the battery, so occasional deep discharges are not going to have a big, short term effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My miles / kWh have not changed much since getting the car in 2017. If anything they have slightly improved - perhaps I'm being more careful. Summer range is 158 miles and winter 145 miles. I have never used a fast DC charger and usually charge using the 7kW home charger or the granny charger - and usually to 100%. My mileage is not high, only 19,000 total so far.
Like I said, the change wasn't noticeable until about 50,000 miles. I use my vehicle as a regular commute vehicle and most of my mileage is freeway HOV lane driving between 70 and 80 mph by myself with no passengers. With all due respect to what you are saying, there is no way I could get the range you are getting unless I draft behind trucks at usually less than 55 mph. Here in coastal southern California, summer or winter doesn't make much difference in temperature nor range.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
You should try and get a odb2 adapter, and the app EVnotify. connect it to the dongle, and you will see all the info on the car. including SOH ( state of health ) on the battery,
then you would see if you really have battery degradation or not.

let us know :)
Yeah, I should try it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
From 125miles down to 100miles, that is 20% degradation which is quite a lot.

Could you share a bit more about your charging habit and frequency?
Do you charge it on daily basis?
To 80% or 100%
AC or rapid DC charging?
Home level 2 AC charger every night to 100%. Then DC fast charger at on the road as needed to 92%. I would say, 90% home charging and 10% fast charging.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Battery Degredation involves a reduction in the capacity of the battery, not a reduction in the efficiency at which the car drives.

125 miles from a 28kWh pack would suggest efficiency around 4.5 miles per kWh.

Around 100 miles at 3.6 miles per kWh would suggest a 28kWh capacity pack.

Chances are, degredation isn't the cause of the reduced range. Reduced efficiency is. And the most likely causes of that are weather, speed, driving style and tyres.

TBH 3.6 miles per kWh seems really low for an Ioniq in California. I get better than that from an old Leaf in England, where it's currently 52°F and rainy.
Like I said, all variables are pretty constant. That's weather, speed, driving style and tires, etc. This is my commute vehicle so it's mostly on the same road at same speed. I am coastal Southern California, weather is not a factor here. I have not changed my tires. Still covers Washington's head on a quarter test (USA).
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Have you changed tires? I'm guessing you must have by 62,000 miles. That is usually a major cause of decreased range. That would also account for decreased miles/kwh. As said prior, a degrading battery should not have much effect on efficiency. My prior car to the Ionic was a Nissan Leaf, which is the king of degradation. I am worried about the fact that the Hyundai battery cooling system seems to be very similar to Nissan's. Almost all other manufactures use liquid cooling (including Hyundai on the new Kona EV).
Nope. I still have more than 1/4" left on the tread. Tire is not the factor.

By the way, I am asking if anyone is seeing battery degradation on their Ioniq EV and other than the person that has 15,000 miles on their car, everyone else is just asking questions. NE1? NE1?
 
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