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Discussion Starter #1
Just bought my first PHEV.

The current townhome I live in is a bit too far from my parking spot for the charger that came with the car to use. Are there PHEV-safe extension cords I can purchase, or do I need to buy a longer charger online? If so, any recommendations?

Thanks.
 

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Yes, it's a level 1. Thanks! You're quite sure it's safe to do so, then?
Yep, in term of current flow, but nothing about rain get into the connection, or some dog chewing the cable, or something like that.
 
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As indicated, as long as the cable is rated to carry a continuous charge load for many hours it will be safe. A few other tips would be to never use it in a coiled state. Always lay it out fully. If coiled it can heat up over a few hours use. Then always check the warmth at the house socket and also the other end at least in the first half-hour and then another hour. If no heat build-up is noticed it will be fine. Also, try to place the joint in cables - and the charger unit itself underneath the car to protect them from adverse weather. And place the cable joint and charger unit on a brick under there to keep it out of standing water.

Care though over some Amazon cables as they are Chinese copies of good ole USA ones.
 

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As indicated, as long as the cable is rated to carry a continuous charge load for many hours it will be safe. A few other tips would be to never use it in a coiled state. Always lay it out fully. If coiled it can heat up over a few hours use. Then always check the warmth at the house socket and also the other end at least in the first half-hour and then another hour. If no heat build-up is noticed it will be fine. Also, try to place the joint in cables - and the charger unit itself underneath the car to protect them from adverse weather. And place the cable joint and charger unit on a brick under there to keep it out of standing water.

Care though over some Amazon cables as they are Chinese copies of good ole USA ones.
Thanks. Guess ill get it at home depot to be safe.
 

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Thanks. Guess ill get it at home depot to be safe.
It is likely that the townhouse outdoor outlet is on a 15 amp circuit but do check with the property supervisors to learn whether or not that outlet is connected to your unit fuse panel. Also, determine what else might be connected to the same circuit such as exterior lights. The reason being that at the maximum draw setting the onboard charger will draw 12 amps which is the maximum allowable on a 15 amp circuit before a fuse somewhere trips. It is possible to dial back the draw in the charging menu to 10 amps or as low as 8 amps.
Do a search online for local charging stations as property management take a dim view of people attempting to draw power without charge. Most are ignorant that you couldn't draw the massive amounts a Tesla would! ?
 
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I bought the thickest extension cord I have ever seen to use with the Hyundai charger. It works perfectly and never gets even remotely warm, which is a very good thing. Not cheap, but IMO it is a requirement.
 

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I bought the thickest extension cord I have ever seen to use with the Hyundai charger. It works perfectly and never gets even remotely warm, which is a very good thing. Not cheap, but IMO it is a requirement.
! use an electrician approved 12 gauge 3- conductor outdoor-rated extension cord with the amperage draw set to the maximum which is I think 12 amps.
What gauge is your cable? It should be written on the outside of your cord.
?
 

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Here in Oz the granny charger is 240v x 10amp max.
We run a extension lead from a standard socket with a standard plug in timer.
On the 10 amp setting the charger is fine but the wall plug of the extension cord gets fairly warm.
Not dangerously as the breaker would trip but I am careful to not chuck anything over the timer so any heat can easily disapate.
The Phev only takes 4.5 hours from flat to recharge so doesn't really run long enough to get super hot plus as mentioned it is breaker and RCD protected.
I always pop the granny charger up on top of the front wheel to protect it from the weather.
 

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If the socket gets warm it's probably due to a bad connection. Check the socket wire connections to ensure the wires are secured to the socket contacts.

It also could be that your home uses an incorrect wire gauge for an electrical socket connection. If the house is old it is pretty usual that lamps and sockets are on the same electrical breakers and with illumination rated wires (less gauge)

It's important to check if you have the correct gauge wire betwheen the principal breaker and the socket... if it's not the wires will get warm.
 

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I ran a 120v Hot Tub off an extension outside in the elements for over a year (GFI circuit), with no problems. The the plugs covered well thought and not in direct sun. Still use the cord today.
 

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If the socket gets warm it's probably due to a bad connection. Check the socket wire connections to ensure the wires are secured to the socket contacts.

It also could be that your home uses an incorrect wire gauge for an electrical socket connection. If the house is old it is pretty usual that lamps and sockets are on the same electrical breakers and with illumination rated wires (less gauge)

It's important to check if you have the correct gauge wire betwheen the principal breaker and the socket... if it's not the wires will get warm.
Yes old house and knowing the shoddy job the previous owner did on everything else there is every chance he used elcheapo wiring.
Only needs to hold together for another 2 months then we are off to our new abode. Have 3ph power and will be running separate circuits so I can eventually run the lighter circuits off a Leaf, probably.
 

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As indicated, as long as the cable is rated to carry a continuous charge load for many hours it will be safe. A few other tips would be to never use it in a coiled state. Always lay it out fully. If coiled it can heat up over a few hours use. Then always check the warmth at the house socket and also the other end at least in the first half-hour and then another hour. If no heat build-up is noticed it will be fine. Also, try to place the joint in cables - and the charger unit itself underneath the car to protect them from adverse weather. And place the cable joint and charger unit on a brick under there to keep it out of standing water.

Care though over some Amazon cables as they are Chinese copies of good ole USA ones.
Is putting it under the car where the battery normally is safe?
 

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Is putting it under the car where the battery normally is safe?
I wouldn't put it on the ground in case of moisture. That is why I put it on the front wheel off the ground protected from rain. Battery is safe from charger no matter where you put it I would think.
 

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Is putting it under the car where the battery normally is safe
Not sure what you think might be unsafe. Do you worry about the car or the extension socket and the charging unit? The car itself would be unaffected. With an Ioniq BEV the extension cable connections and charger would be underneath the boot area and well away from the sealed battery pack. They would be protected from any wetness there as long as they were also off the ground sat on a brick or two.

In one of my 'granny' locations, my cable extension only reached to about 4 metres short of the car so I also carried a plastic tub and two bricks. One on the floor to sit the socket and charger on. Then the box upturned over them. Then the second brick on top of the box to hold it in place against wind.

It's really about protecting exposed electrical items from damp so any such measures would work. And be perfectly safe as long as the usual checks are made after 15 minutes and then an hour to make sure that heat isn't building up.
 

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Not sure what you think might be unsafe. Do you worry about the car or the extension socket and the charging unit? The car itself would be unaffected. With an Ioniq BEV the extension cable connections and charger would be underneath the boot area and well away from the sealed battery pack. They would be protected from any wetness there as long as they were also off the ground sat on a brick or two.

In one of my 'granny' locations, my cable extension only reached to about 4 metres short of the car so I also carried a plastic tub and two bricks. One on the floor to sit the socket and charger on. Then the box upturned over them. Then the second brick on top of the box to hold it in place against wind.

It's really about protecting exposed electrical items from damp so any such measures would work. And be perfectly safe as long as the usual checks are made after 15 minutes and then an hour to make sure that heat isn't building up.
I have the 'granny cable' control brick taped up inside of an empty plastic windshield washer fluid bottle to protect it from weather and damage from being dragged in and out of the car 2-4 times a day.
I will have to check it with a laser thermometer in the sommer to if it is getting hot.
?
 

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I have the 'granny cable' control brick taped up inside of an empty plastic windshield washer fluid bottle to protect it from weather and damage from being dragged in and out of the car 2-4 times a day.
I will have to check it with a laser thermometer in the sommer to if it is getting hot.
?
Hyundai's trickle charger has a thermal sensor on the wall plug end to shut itself down if that gets too hot, mostly to deal with old/loose/worn sockets that don't make good contact and cause resistive heating at the connection. Inside the box there's only a small amount of electronics and a contactor (fancy relay) that's purpose-built for the level of current it may have to interrupt, so nothing that should generate any significant heat in and of itself. It may even have it's own thermal sensor for a safety shutdown. I wouldn't be worried about it, but if you want to get a measurement for curiosity's sake then have at 'er (and report it here because I'm curious too)...
 
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Hyundai's trickle charger has a thermal sensor on the wall plug end to shut itself down if that gets too hot, mostly to deal with old/loose/worn sockets that don't make good contact and cause resistive heating at the connection. Inside the box there's only a small amount of electronics and a contactor (fancy relay) that's purpose-built for the level of current it may have to interrupt, so nothing that should generate any significant heat in and of itself. It may even have its own thermal sensor for a safety shutdown. I wouldn't be worried about it, but if you want to get a measurement for curiosity's sake then have at 'er (and report it here because I'm curious too)...
Thanks for that KevinT.
When I first got the car there were just two places to charge in Sudbury. So I learned from an electrician what would be safe before purchasing an 80-foot 12 gauge work site type extension cable. I have measured 45*C were it plugs into a dedicated 15 amp socket designed for use with a kettle on the stove faceplate.
How hot is too hot?
I have no need for this arrangement since there are now 11 places to charge spread threw out the city.
It feels like we in the north are at least 10 years behind cities like Oslo Noway when considering infrastructure!
?
 
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